Why does Noynoy Aquino have a negative attitude?

Oh my God! I just had the biggest epiphany. Noynoy Aquino is the candidate who has the most negative mental attitude among the rest of the presidential candidates! And his negative outlook towards the whole election process is being fuelled by his own team of supporters.

Just think about it. From Day One, they have been bandying the word “evil” and branding everyone who is running against Noynoy as such.

Evil Gloria

First, Noynoy Aquino and his camp blame all of the ills of the Philippines on one person, and that is President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo. Never mind that a lot of factors contribute to the woes of the country today, like the incompetence of past presidents (which includes former President Cory Aquino), natural disasters, overpopulation, and global financial crises; not to mention corruption in the public sector and the average Filipino’s general lack of cooperation.

If we compare figures during the time of Noynoy’s late mother’s reign, the Philippine economy right now is not really doing that bad despite the global financial crisis that hit a lot of major countries in late 2008. Here is an entry from Wikepedia (feel free to debunk these claims):

The current administration under President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo has been marked by radical and risky moves pushing toward faster and more rapid economic growth. In recent years, Arroyo’s stance towards economic improvement since 2004 has seen the Philippines re-emerge as one of the growing economies in Southeast Asia. In 2004, the Philippine economy grew by 6.1%, beating most analysts and even the government’s estimates. In 2005, the Philippine peso posted an appreciation rate of 6%–the fastest in the Asian region for that year. However, the advent of high oil prices dampened the government’s growth estimates for that same year as growth only amounted to 5.1%. The Philippines is still faced with the challenge of generating income internally, as it has the third-highest rate of remittances from overseas in the world. During 2006, the economy posted a 5.4% growth, dampened by two typhoons which wreaked havoc on the agricultural sector. The government plans to bolster infrastructure spending in 2007 tenfold, and is targeting an accelerated growth of the economy by 7% in 2007, 8% in 2008, and 9% in 2009 well as improved domestic improvement. President Arroyo had visioned that by 2020 the Philippines would be a First World country.

Compare that with the short entry describing the economy during former president Cory Aquino’s term as President:

By the time of the People Power revolution, the economy had declined, falling severely below the growth of other nations in Southeast Asia. A severe recession in 1984-85 saw the economy shrink by more than 10%, and perceptions of political instability during the Aquino administration further damped economic activity.

The perception of political instability during the Aquino administration had dampened economic activity. It looks more and more like this statement can be also used to describe things to come under a Noynoy Aquino presidency.

Gloria Arroyo’s last State of the Nation Address (SONA) highlighted the following:

1. We have a strong economy and a strong fiscal position to withstand global shocks.

2. We built new modern infrastructure and completed unfinished ones.

3. The economy is more fair to the poor than ever before.

4. We are building a sound base for the next generation.

5. International authorities have taken notice that we are safer from environmental degradation and man-made disasters.

I don’t really agree with item number four as far as Filipino attitudes go but as far as I can tell, no one has really debunked her statements to be untrue except for item number five. Typhoon Ondoy proved that much of the country including Metro Manila is not that safe from man-made disasters. But can we really blame all this on Gloria Arroyo? She has only been president since 2001. Much of the country’s infrastructure that imperil us today was already there even before she came into office. Therefore, it does not come across as very smart for Noynoy and his camp to be blaming all of the current problems on Gloria Arroyo’s administration. If we have to do any finger pointing, we need more fingers to do that because we should be including former presidents, Joseph Estrada, Fidel Ramos, Cory Aquino, and Ferdinand Marcos and the rest of the past presidents that ruled us since the granting of our independence by the Americans.

Noynoy Aquino and his camp are also hindering much needed changes that will enable the country to move forward. They are against charter change and switching to a parliamentary system. This is because they see these changes as parts of an overall effort perpetrated by President Gloria Arroyo to hold on to power. Noynoy Aquino and his supporters have a negative mental attitude indeed.

Evil Manny

Senator Manny Villar is the strongest opponent of Noynoy Aquino in the coming elections. Noynoy Aquino supporters assume that if you are not voting for Noynoy, then you are definitely voting for Villar, or by voting for someone else like Gordon or Gibo who they perceive to be not winnable, you are contributing to the likelihood of a Villar win in May. This makes you, the voter, evil too.

Noynoy Aquino and his supporters also keep referring to Villar’s wealth as ill-gotten. Never mind that no one has yet filed any charges or proven these allegations. Regardless of how Villar acquired his wealth, he has never indulged in the sort of negative campaigning that Noynoy and his camp engage in. Noynoy and his supporters also focus on blaming Manny’s vigorous advertising for the sudden surge in his popularity. But this is funny because the millions of pesos that Manny spends on his campaign is actually stimulating the economy. If you don’t believe me, here is an excerpt from a column in the business section of the Manila Bulletin written by Bernardo M. Villegas in April 2009:

Another reason why I think that the Philippine GDP will grow at 4% or more in 2009 is the additional stimulus that will come from the billions of pesos that the candidates for the May 2010 elections, which spending can be expected to start during this coming Holy Week and will gather steam by Christmas 2009. Considering the lead time needed for campaigning in this country, the bulk of the expenditures will actually be in 2009. Already one could notice all the pictures of potential candidates in the Metro Manila area appearing in posters containing their hearty congratulations to the students of high schools and universities graduating in March 2009. My own personal calculation of all the spending of presidential, senatorial, House of Representatives, and local officials is about 80 billion pesos.

Don’t get me wrong, I definitely don’t agree with Villar’s unfair advantage with campaign advertising, but can you blame the guy? It’s the stupid rule that allows him to do what he does and it is his money that he is stupidly spending. So, why then is Noynoy and his camp glibly branding him as evil too? It sounds like Noynoy and his camp are engaging in negative campaigning, if you ask me.

Evil Gibo

Gilbert ‘Gibo’ C. Teodoro, Jr is the former Secretary of the Department of National Defense – Republic of the Philippines. It says so on his Facebook fan page. Because he used to report to President Gloria Arroyo, he is evil too according to Noynoy and his supporters. Despite all the mud thrown at Gibo by Noynoy and his crew, Gibo’s main campaign theme is positive. This is only highlighted by the fact that a lot of Noynoy Aquino supporters try and wreak havoc on his Facebook fan page but are never banned — unless, of course, they use foul language or behave rudely.

Evil Gordon

Senator Richard “Dick” Gordon is evil according to Noynoy Aquino supporters. Ask them why and they will tell you it’s because of his “shenanigans” during the FVR years. Ask them to expound on those “shenanigans” and they will immediately shy away. Gordon is evil according to Noynoy Aquino supporters because he is just a “tuta” of Gloria Arroyo. Ask them how so and they will not be able to cite specifics. Gordon supporters are evil according to Noynoy Aquino supporters because if you vote for Gordon, you will just pave the way for a Manny Villar win. Noynoy Aquino and his camp have nothing against Gordon but that doesn’t stop Noynoy Aquino supporters from engaging in negative campaigning against him.

Noynoy and his negative attitude

Noynoy Aquino supporters engage in a negative campaign that pervades local publications and the Net. Some Noynoy supporters even came up with a fake email that supposedly came from Winnie Monsod which expresses support for Noynoy. This was vehemently denied by Winnie Monsod herself. If you want further proof that Noynoy Aquino has a negative mental attitude that rubs off on his supporters, just check out what he said about the possible failure of elections. He doesn’t trust the system, much more considering that it is the country’s first time to use an automated system. You can’t even see any excitement in his eyes despite it being a very historic election for our country. He fears for a “failure of elections” even though there is no precedent in using this kind of system in the past.

Noynoy doesn’t believe that “Yes, the Filipino can!” There is no enthusiasm in his campaign. The best he could come up with is “Hindi ako magnanakaw.” This slogan presumes that everyone else is going to cheat and steal — everyone except him, of course. I’ve never heard him use encouraging words to the Filipino people to go out and vote for the country. It’s just always about him and his fears for a failure of elections or being cheated out of the win he feels he is entitled to.

Noynoy Aquino also thinks that it is not worth going to presidential debates because he says that there is no value in doing so (perhaps because he sees Filipinos as too dumb to appreciate such intellectual exercises). To quote Noynoy as reported on the Daily Tribune on the 12th of March of this year:

“I’ll be honest with you, who do you think really listens to those debates? It’s not our target market,” he told reporters who covered LP’s campaign sorties in Surigao City and Zamboanga City, pointing out that a program like a three-hour debate would eat up one day for review of notes.

The above statement from Noynoy clearly shows that he doesn’t believe the average Filipino is even worth his time. By saying that it is not their target market, he exhibited complete disregard for the educated voters who want to hear what he has to say about a lot of issues.

When Jesus Christ was still here on earth, he never had such negative mental attitude like Noynoy Aquino. He always campaigned with positivism. He even encouraged Judas to do what he had to do because he knew that in the end he will be exalted.

Perhaps Noynoy Aquino needs to read some self-help books by Dale Carnegie. He would really benefit from the book “How to Win Friends and Influence People.”

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127 Responses to Why does Noynoy Aquino have a negative attitude?

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  2. J.B. says:

    To me, Noynoy is only a poor communicator.

    Senators, Congressmen and local officials know or capable of knowing how much their peers are earning from infrastructure contracts.

    They would ask a contractor dealing with others, “How much so and so is getting?”. Noynoy doesn’t seem to express how much he know under the tables.

    Villar will surely recoup his campaign expenses as far as those people involved in this trade is concerned.

    • ilda says:

      Hi JB

      Ultimately, the people deserve the president they elect. Whether they choose someone like Noynoy who is a poor communicator as you said or Villar who you think will try and recoup the money he spent on advertising after being elected.

      If they choose to elect Noynoy without even asking him to lift his game, then they will eventually realise later on that he is incompetent. If they elect Villar because they got razzle-dazzled by Willie Villarame and his campaign advertising, then they shouldn’t be surprised at the way he will try and dodge queries about important issues by using the same tactics.

      Cheers!

      • J.B. says:

        Rightly so.

        I am not really sure what to feel whether I would laugh, cry, or agonize when I saw posters somewhere in Davao of local liberal stalwarts under Noynoy promoting “Kung walang corrupt, walang mahirap” when these local execs are known as perennial raiders of local govt coffers.

    • glenn says:

      There’s a big difference between a poor communicator and a mental retarded.
      Poor communicators can be understand by his peers while a mental retarded only Joshua (Aquino-Salvador) can understand them.

      • J.B. says:

        That’s in reference to his incapacity to express how dirt the system is from the inside.

      • Melinda says:

        How low can you go? What has the little boy Joshua ever done to you?
        And the writer of this post has a positive attitude, I presume?

      • ilda says:

        @Melinda

        And the writer of this post has a positive attitude, I presume?

        My attitude is much better than Noynoy’s. You can call it being positive but I prefer to be called a realist :)

  3. benign0 says:

    Here’s Noynoy being “positive”:

    :D

  4. thenonhacker says:

    You know what?
    Noynoy is the poster boy of insecurities.

  5. thenonhacker says:

    UP NEXT: Noynoy’s plan for the Philippines to success: Campaign that our neighboring South-East Asian countries are evil.

  6. ChinoF says:

    Again… don’t you just love a guy who hates to lose? :P

    Everything is evil if he doesn’t win. LOL

    Next thing he’ll think of after “hindi ako magnanakaw….” – “hindi ako pessimist” :P

    • ilda says:

      What is so far-fetched is Noynoy supporters like Abe Margallo who compare him to Obama. Obama practiced positive campaigning all the way to the end. That’s not something we see now with Noynoy who is always crying foul.

      Noynoy = Obama ?!? Gimme a break!!!

  7. Kaya Natin?!? says:

    In contrast to Gibo’s pages which do not ban or censor all the profanities posted there by the boisterous Noynoy fans, Noynoy supporters and all of Noynoy’s facebook fan pages, Noynoy discussion groups, and forums controlled by pro-Noynoy moderators ALWAYS ban those who post arguments that expose Noynoy’s unsuitability. These are not even insults. They are factual expositions that reveal Noynoy’s inadequacies. In fact, sometimes, there are no new facts in these arguments, only well-explained and logically-presented scenarios that show why Noynoy is just not the right choice.

    In any case, all such posts are deleted and whoever posted them are usually subjected to banning or excessive moderation.

    In fact, on facebook, people who end up discussing or debating with known Noynoy supporters on their own profiles find themselves unfriended. There are so many numerous reports that expose Ateneo theology teacher and Kaya Natin founder HARVEY KEH as being notorious for such acts.

    The real problem with people such as Keh is his position as an academic and “intellectual” (being in the teaching staff of Ateneo), yet simply because he has absolutely no way of properly rebutting any of the views expressed against Noynoy, he resorts to dictatorial behavior.

    Noynoy and his supporters are not representatives of real democracy. Instead, their real advocacy is REPRESSION and TOTALITARIANISM because every time they are unable to rebut the arguments against Noynoy (usually about his incompetence, inabilities, lackluster performance, and especially Hacienda Luisita), they always delete the posts/comments they don’t like and ban or unfriend those who posted such comments.

    There simply are no logical reasons for supporting Noynoy, so the only way for Noynoy supporters including Harvey Keh to remain supportive of Noynoy in the face of his obvious setbacks is to delete anything that can dampen their belief in him.

    Just look at this behavior. On electronic forums, forum participants who oppose Noynoy are DELETED. How would that translate in real life OUTSIDE of electronic forums?

    Answer: disappearances, salvagings, summary execution. muffled press. muffled opinions.

    Noynoy’s supporters are NOT DEMOCRATIC! Harvey Keh is NOT democratic.

    • Victor says:

      Being negative is Noynoy Aquino’s best campaign. That way the focus is transferred away from him. They should device all sorts of ways so that the focus will not be Noynoy. If he becomes the focus, people will be disappointed that there’s nothing really to see there.

      I’m happy that Villar backed out of the Tandem debate as well. Even ABS-CBN thinks that there’s nothing amazing about Aquino. Without Gibo and Villar to be targets of Aquino’s Mud, Aquino is left in an awkward position of defending his self against his self. He has to prove to his supporters that he has a concrete plan for the country. He cannot go on and on for hours about Gloria. He owes it to his “blind supporters.” ABSCBN knows that an Aquino Mar show alone will be boring and doesn’t have any substance. But if that tandem debate prospered and Aquino faces off with ERAP, I think ERAP will win the debate by a mile. . . anytimeErap doesn’t pretend to be Smart by being arrogant. Besides ERAP is street smart. He has been there.

      • ilda says:

        Hi Victor

        Noynoy supporters are usually intolerant of other people’s point of view. They would rather not hear what others have to say. I wouldn’t be surprised if they don’t even bother reading articles like mine. They can be sensitive and onion-skinned. They also hide serious character flaws using the victim mentality tactics.

        I once read somewhere that when Noynoy attended one debate, he lost his cool because he claimed that the moderator was pro-Villar and were asking questions that were unfavourable to him. This is obviously the reason why Noynoy and his supporters do not want to enter into debates anymore. To me it’s so simple, just answer the questions. There’s nothing to fear if you have nothing to hide or if you know what you are talking about.

        Welcome to AP :)

      • abcdef says:

        alam mo ba kung ano reason kung bakit napikon si pikonoy? nag-change lang ng order ng pagsagot. dati villar to aquino ang arrangement then naging aquino to villar. ang babaw noh? para yun lang nag-inarte na. pinakita lang niya na hindi siya handa lagi.

      • ilda says:

        Gees, that was really classy.

      • Anonylol says:

        “Noynoy supporters are usually intolerant of other people’s point of view. They would rather not hear what others have to say. I wouldn’t be surprised if they don’t even bother reading articles like mine. They can be sensitive and onion-skinned. They also hide serious character flaws using the victim mentality tactics.”

        In other words the typical Filipino.

        The implications are kind of depressing.

      • ilda says:

        Well, you’re right. That’s why Noynoy will win the election. There are plenty of Filipinos with their kind of mentality… sigh…for once I hope I’m wrong and someone else wins :(

    • ilda says:

      Hi Kaya Natin?!?

      Thanks for your comment, I really appreciate it.

      I went to the Noynoy Aquino Facebook fan page once and there was something eerily so surreal about the page. The fan page is so neat and tidy. There weren’t any discussions or debates going on, just full of “likes” and praises. This is because issues against Noynoy are not tolerated. The atmosphere gave me the feeling that it was being run by robots who automatically purge comments unfavourable to Noynoy.

      If what you’re saying is true about Harvey Keh, that’s very disappointing. That’s so Nazi like behaviour. Unfortunately, there are a lot of esteemed members of the Philippine society who think of themselves as angels just because they are supporting Noynoy. They need to get a grip on reality.

      Good luck to the Filipino people!

    • kori says:

      HARVEY KEH. Poser of the century. Self-righteous ass.

      My six-year despise for him is founded on his being arrogant. He handled our NSTP program feeling like he was a king. Like, WHY?!?!?!? Oh and criticism against him in Ateneo is also kind of strong, so you’re not alone.

      And now I learn he does that. That goes against Theology, against every freaking Atenean value that I learned: MAGIS, CURA PERSONALIS. Is he erroneously doing that Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam? St. Ignatius wouldn’t be too happy with him. Nor Fr. Ben.

      Gosh if Noy gets elected, the whole world, civil society organizations (w/c I ironically belong to, I think I’m even alone supporting Gibo), will be embarrassed.. with the likes of Harvey Keh running the show. So these people have to rethink their choice now and decide on someone who is truly for change and openness.

      • ilda says:

        HARVEY KEH probably has a rock star syndrome as well.

        When someone has a rock star syndrome, they start to think that they are amazing when in reality, they suck. This disease causes the person to be extremely c o c ky and full of themselves and can prevent a person from hearing their flaws, preventing them from getting any better. If rock star syndrome is left untreated, it may become permanent.

        Welcome to AP Kori :)

      • ChinoF says:

        For the mistakes of one, the rest of the group gets some flack too. That’s how it is abroad. Just because one Filipino speaks and raises his voice on the cellphone DURING SERVICES in a Singaporean church, the Singaporeans might think other Filipinos are like this as well. The rest of the Filipinos there are certainly embarrassed. Guess we should discipline our fellows who are like that loudmouth Filipino. I mean, do you really have to shout into your cellphone to be heard? Probably Keh is like that for us Ateneans, hehehe.

      • BongV says:

        kori:

        Atenista pala tong si Noynoy.

        E Atenista rin naman si Gordon a. Naglaw pa talaga sa UP.

        Bottom line, I don’t care if Gordon graduated from a diploma mill – he has an impressive record of public service compared to Noynoy’s uninspired performance.

        one atenista “value” that i junked – “man for others”.

        nakakasawa na, reminds me of – “ang naniniwala sa sabi-sabi, walang bait sa sarili”. hay naku – andami kong pinakinggan about being “man for others” – noon nagkapasubuan na, mabilis pa sa alas kwatro ang mga lintyak. :D

        kaya, i replaced “man for others” with “ako muna” – after i have taken care of myself, then i take care of you – para bang sa eroplano, specially when its crashing – put your gas mask on, first. then, you help others.

        the logic being, how can you help others when you cannot even help yourself – you cannot give away, what you don’t have.

      • ilda says:

        Marami yatang nakapasa sa Ateneo na hinde naman dapat :)

        I find it hypocritical the way some Filipinos try to project an image of self-sacrifice. A lot of them eventually implode because they are just forced to do something they don’t really want to do. I’m afraid that might happen to Noynoy one day.

    • wel says:

      …and so is the CULT leader… LOL

    • wel says:

      oops! mistake… natuwa lang ako dun sa last line ng comment ni “Kaya Natin ‘To” and tried to add a line… without realizing that my comment will not connect to the last reply made by ilda… SOWEE POW!

      sometimes i tend to become stupid…but not that STUPID to vote for noynoy…

      anyways, my line should have appeared like this:

      …Nonoy’s supporters are NOT DEMOCRATIC, Harvey Keh is NOT DEMOCRATIC…. and so is the CULT leader…LOL

      hindi kaya sila under spell or something? LOL

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  9. Dino says:

    This article is evidently ill-informed.

    Noynoy has always been there in the debates. He always say that Filipinos can do it. Where is this person coming from?

    It’s natural to be afraid of being cheated especially if you have an incumbent president who will do everything to remain in power and who already cheated her way out in the past (remember Hello Garci?). To call people negative and cynical just by airing out a real concern that must be raised anyway in order to make the people more vigilant is just plain stupid.

    And just because an impostor of Winnie Monsod created an article doesn’t mean that it’s Noynoy who is negative. In fact, have you guys read the article? It might not be Winnie Monsod who wrote it, but the article has interesting insights…. See more

    Finally, Cory Aquino’s administration might not have been perfect. But she did a spectacular job nonetheless. No one could have done a better job, in my opinion. She faced a huge earthquake in the North, the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo which destroyed 80,000 hectares of land and destroyed the commerce of 3 provinces, the US bases left the country which changed our place in the international market and international relations, she had 9 coups, and the Marcos allies who were really out there to destabilize her government and were doing so as if it’s their ultimate vocation in life. And yet, despite the odds and the difficulties that we were facing, we still had a positive growth. This was DESPITE THE LACK OF CONFIDENCE TO THE PHILIPPINES especially after we suffered a negative growth in 1984-1985 under the Marcos regime.

    Clearly Cory wasn’t perfect. But no one could have doe what she was able to do. We moved forward as a nation, away from the pitfalls of a civil war and tyranny. She also managed to restore our democracy.

    Check these articles out, articles that are way credible than this highly baseless article that we are reading:

    This one was written by Dr. Villacorta, Professor Emeritus of DLSU and former Deputy Secretary General of ASEAN:

    http://noypi-ako.com/noynoy-aquino-is-the-most-competent-and-credible-candidate-to-be-the-next-president-of-the-philippines/

    This one is from Professor Emeritus of DLSU Dr. Isagani Cruz, who also Chairs the selection for National Artists of NCAA. He was also former Undersecretary of Education. He was impressed with Noynoy’s educational agenda:

    http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=554757

    Thousands of testimonials are available on-line. Just give him a chance and you will see.

    If you have a facebook account, you will see that economists are also for Noynoy as they were impressed by his economic agenda:

    And oh, economists also are impressed with Noynoy’s economic agenda.
    Here’s the link:

    http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=370258321992&id=100000232533452&ref=mf

    Cheers. May pag-asa pa ang bayan.

    • ChinoF says:

      I dunno, buddy. You sure he’s been at all debates when it’s been more said on the news that he’s evading them? It’s your word against all these reports. Also, the campaign of Noynoy against corruption has the style that says everybody except him is corrupt. Isn’t that a negative way of doing things? It’s like he’s attacking others, “They’re all corrupt, I’m not,” which for me is a really farfetched claim. But saying everyone else is corrupt sure is negative.

      On economists (I assume they’re also local economists only), I wonder how many are really for Noynoy’s agenda. Is it all of them, or just a number? As for those who like him, probably they do because he’ll uphold or even strengthen the protectionism that keeps big business rich and the ordinary people poor and wanting to leave the country. There will certainly be economists who are against Noynoy though, and I would like to hear from them.

    • ilda says:

      Hi Dino

      Thanks for your comments. Noynoy supporters are always welcome at Anti-Pinoy :)

      I tend to agree with some people’s view that Noynoy was being an alarmist when he kept talking about the failure of elections. I think he was being negative. First of all, why only now would he question the security of the automated machines? He should have thought of reviewing the source code of the machines months ago. I don’t really see his enthusiasm for such a historic move from a manual counting of votes to using automated machines. This should be an exciting time for every voter and candidate because we do not have to wait weeks or months for the result anymore unlike the previous elections.

      The reason why Noynoy appears negative is because he and his supporters are always crying foul. I don’t really understand why since your camp is claiming that he is already leading the polls. First, you were complaining that Manny Villar is overspending on his advertising that’s why he is gaining in the polls. If you really had confidence in your supporters, you wouldn’t find Villar a threat or even think that Villar’s advertising will lure your voters into voting for Manny. Next, there was this debate where Noynoy lost his cool because he was claiming that the moderator was pro-Villar. What is there to fear about the questions? Just answer the questions. Then Noynoy said that he does not care for debates anymore because he thinks it’s just a waste of time and it’s not for his target audience. Now, this latest negativism is the fear of failure of elections. For me, the fear is unfounded especially since the Comelec is already assuring him that it can’t happen nationwide and if manual counting is needed in those areas, then, they will use it. C’mon, don’t you think that he really does appear negative? Of course he does. I don’t see Noynoy as leader material for the country.

      On the late President Cory Aquino, I don’t think you can claim that she did a spectacular job. In my opinion, her administration was very unstable. She was inexperienced. She did not gain the respect of her detractors. This is evident in the fact that everyone thinks that they can do a better job than her. Where is the evidence that the Philippine economy gained positively during her time? Are you saying Wikepedia is wrong :D ? If she was effective the way you say she was, why is the Philippines still the way it is today? The Marcoses where just replaced by the Conjuancos and the Lopezes if you ask me. Here’s my take on the whole Aquino legacy as written in my blog Edsa Revolutions, Noynoy Aquino and the Big Conspiracy:

      In his book Asian Values, Western Dreams Greg Sheridan talks about how Cory was considered heroic in achieving democracy but ineffectual as president. Even the noted intellectual, Frank Jose, who ran a magazine called Solidaridad, considered “Mrs Aquino’s presidency a dreadful disappointment”. He disagrees with the majority’s view that Cory restored democracy and says that it is all bullshit – “We have empty institutions. The essence of democracy is in the stomach. The taxi driver in Washington can eat the same sort of meat as the president. That’s not the case here”.

      Why is the country still the way it is today?

      The real problem started when the Marcos collaborators were not even put on trial. Just look around the Philippine political setting right now. You will still see the likes of Juan Ponce Enrile who was a one-time Marcos collaborator. He is head of the Senate. By defecting to the opposition in 1986, he had secured immunity from being taken to account for his former master’s atrocities. Imelda Marcos herself is still received warmly at various elite social functions. There exist in our society a lack of moral judgement and moral commitment. Since we fail to condemn those who do our society wrong, we jump into bed with the demons of impunity, corruption, and lack of accountability. If the most heinous crimes go unpunished what is there to arrest the equally-widespread incompetence that characterizes our public officials’ tenures? If the Aquino camp were so sure that former president Marcos and his allies were responsible for Ninoy Aquino’s death, how come none of them were ever put on trial? Even the former president and one time criminal Joseph “Erap” Estrada is now free to run again as a presidential candidate. He is even getting a marginal lead in the polls. Where is the justice there?

      Even children of former politicians have joined the Philippine political gold-rush without shame. This includes Bong Bong Marcos, Jinggoy Estrada, Mikey Arroyo, Mar Roxas and most noted of all Noynoy Aquino, the strongest contender for the prized seat once occupied by his mother. The incumbent president, Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo is also the daughter of former president Diosdado Macapagal. Philippine politics so it seems, is just a recreational sport for a few dozen families from the landed oligarchy; a ball which is passed on from one family to the next.

      You mentioned that the U.S. military left the Philippines during Cory’s time and you made it sound like she had nothing to do with it. Last I heard she was very instrumental in kicking the Americans out. She was also instrumental in framing the 1987 Constitution which is hampering the growth of our nation due to its protectionist clause.

      She was lucky she had Dick Gordon in Olongapo when the U.S. military pulled out and when Mt Pinatubo erupted. Now, there is a man who is capable of being the next president. You gotta give credit where credit is due. If Cory had only listened to Dick Gordon about the constitution and the retention of the U.S. bases, things would have been fine for her.

      As to Winnie Monsod’s imposter, I don’t understand why Noynoy’s camp allowed that email to circulate. I guess if the material is favourable to your side, it’s ok to let it spread around.

      Cheers!

      • Rob' Ramos says:

        Actually, Cory campaigned for the retention of the US Bases. She even led a rally to the Senate, Nuns and Priests and all, to force it to extend the lease on Clark and Subic.

        As for the article… very much what I had in mind. Although I was thinking more along the lines of… stronger language, like how the Noynoy camp is preaching Politics of Hate.

        I was on the “other side” of the Liberal Party Civil War and I had firsthand experience of how Noynoy and his friends treat dissent. After they railroaded the decision for the LP to remove its support from Gloria – I was there; and this not one week after going to Malacañang to tell her they’re behind her. And, yes, I know what I’m talking about, Noynoy Cultists, because I was their media officer – we in the youth wing came out with a strong position paper asking the Party President to immediately convene our National Executive Council and resolve the issue before it splits the Party. The LP President then was Frank Drilon.

        Another person who could have called for our NECO and immediately resolved the issue was the Party Secretary General. At the time, this was Noynoy Aquino. Instead of convincing his buddy Frank to let the Party leaders decide, he comes out with a pages-long memorandum justifying their action of 8 July 2005.

        As for us in the youth wing who refused to kowtow to them… Well. Our Mindanao Congress, which was to be held a week or two after July 8, almost got torpedoed because their people started calling our delegates to tell them it was cancelled. We only found out Drilon’s people were doing this because the delegates, now confused, called us, so did the Foundation sponsoring our activity. Needless to say, we were shocked. Or maybe not, since we knew this was going to happen.

        Why’d they do this? Because they were trumpeting over media how the LP had a “unified” stand vs. Gloria, and here were three of the youth wing’s leaders (who were also staff of the LP NHQ at the time), all going to the Mindanao Congress; surely people will ask us, right? At ano sasabihin namin sa mga leader namin sa Mindanao kundi yung talaga nangyari sa Club Filipino nung July 8?

        You can’t imagine the amount of suppression and oppression we who dissented with the “Party line” got. Isa lang naman demand namin before Lito Atienza did his March 2 thing and formally split the LP: that Drilon, or Noynoy, convenes our NECO and resolve the issue once and for all. No courts, no press releases. Just the full leadership of the Liberal Party discussing the 8 July 2005 “stand” and resolving it, like how we handled the tricky issue of who to support in 2004.

        And what did they do? Nothing. Delayed and delayed, while all the while trumpeting over the media that, “there’s no split; we are against Gloria.”

        Drilon led and orchestrated much of the suppression of the truth regarding the LP’s “stand” that dreary July 8. But Noynoy had the chance to be a man, to be the man worthy of his father’s legacy, by doing the right thing and respecting the LP’s internal processes and its core principles… but he chose not to. He even went out of his way to convince other people of the rightness of what he and his fellows did to the LP in 8 July 2005, instead of just letting the democratic processes of the Party decide who was right or wrong that day, or whether what THEY did was right or wrong.

        That’s the kind of President Noynoy supporters want to elect.

        Which is why I’m not surprised at the way they handle criticism and debate, this Politics of Hate they preach, the extreme intolerance to other views. I can understand partisanship, even passionately so, but the way many of his supporters do it?

        They win, I fear we’ll go the way of Weimar Germany. Thank God I have a new passport.

      • ilda says:

        Hi Rob Ramos

        Wow! Explosive stuff! I feel like publishing this as an article :)

        I have made repeated search on how Cory Aquino handled the US bases and I could not find anything that said she rallied very hard for the retention of the US bases.

        If she was in favor of the retention, I guess her campaign for the retention of the bases was not as noisy as Dick Gordon’s. What I actually found was that she only let her cabinet members raise their hand to indicate whether they were in favor or not. Again, this is a classic demonstration of her incapacity to persuade people to do the right thing for in the end, it’s always the self-righteous bunch in her party who won.

        Thanks for confirming what we already suspect about the Liberal Party. It must have been devastating for you to witness and experience first hand how politicians like Frank Drilon manipulate the truth. Considering you were still young then, I can imagine the disillusionment you must have felt. Filipinos should know all about this.

        As for Noynoy, even without knowing all the details you mentioned above, rational people can pretty much tell that he does not have a mind of his own. He just sorts of go with the flow. The mere fact that he accepted the clamor for him to run as president immediately after his mother’s death says a lot about his inability to grasp the seriousness of the situation he and the country is in.

        I read some of your blogs. I think you are my twin, except you write much better of course :) You should be an Anti-Pinoy blogger.

    • Monique Dela Cruz says:

      Hello Dino

      Regarding Noynoy and his attendance to debates… I have not seen him much. I often watch debates to see how GORDON will change the minds of Filipinos. I have not seen much of Noynoy during those debates except for one which was aired on ANC with Ted Failon as the moderator.

      On Noynoy’s achievements and capabilities… You know, pictures have been spreading about Noynoy caught sleeping. I do not mind if he sleeps and how often and lengthy his sleeps are but I am concerned about how much he has contributed to this country while he was awake. I am a big fan of democracy… and we owe that to Ninoy, Cory, and of course to the millions of Filipinos who fought for it. Ninoy and Cory are already at peace. The millions of Filipinos are still here… and it is no longer democracy that they just need… it is PROGRESS. I doubt Noynoy’s capacity because his track record of governance is close to empty. He is lucky and blessed to have heroes as parents but he has to create his own self before he could mold us Filipinos to be better. He has 3 more years in the senate if he does not make it to be president this 2010. He still has to prove he is his own man and by then, I will believe the promises. Do we really want change? Do we really want to be progressive?

      I encourage you to visit http://www.senate.gov.ph and review your candidate.

      Best regards,
      Monique

      • ilda says:

        Tama ka dyan Monique.

        Noynoy said he does not want to engage in debates any more so I don’t know why some Noynoy supporters are now saying it is Villar who is backing out of it. They are good at twisting facts.

  10. mahirap says:

    walang corrupt = walang mahirap.
    walang mahirap = walang noynoy.

    yan rin lang ginagatungan nya eh…

  11. justice league says:

    Ilda,

    “Aquino Leads a March in Support of U.S. Base Pact ”

    http://www.nytimes.com/1991/09/11/world/aquino-leads-a-march-in-support-of-us-base-pact.html?pagewanted=1

    And she did that against the concerns of many in her own Cabinet. Her Health Secretary (Bengzon) even wanted to resign after she led the demonstration. So even with a so called “self-righteous bunch” in her party, she definitely did what she wanted in that case.

    Happy Easter.

    • ilda says:

      Hi Justice League

      It’s nice to see you here more often and thanks for the link. You’re definitely good at digging up info :)

      Well, I read the article and it just confirmed my impression of her as an ineffectual stateswoman.

      I do not understand for the life of me why she had to resort to rallying up a crowd just for this issue instead of using convincing arguments in congress.

      To quote the article: “Mrs. Aquino said today that the senators needed to be reminded of “people power.” Her supporters responded with chants of “Cory! Cory!”

      Hello??? Every time she was facing a tough battle, her solution was “people power”.

      And I think we will see more of that happening from Noynoy Aquino.

  12. justice league says:

    Ilda,

    I do not understand for the life of me why she had to resort to rallying up a crowd just for this issue instead of using convincing arguments in congress.

    “Six people were wounded after the march when a bomb concealed in a delivery truck exploded outside the Senate while Mrs. Aquino was inside meeting with legislative leaders over the base agreement. The motive for the bombing was not known.”

    She tried all she could.

    Even the military leaders were saber rattling in favor of the American bases.

    But President Cory Aquino respected the Senate’s “internal processes and its core principles”.

    Bottomline is that a large number of Senate members could not be convinced for the bases retention and I don’t think anyone could have convinced them so, without somehow impairing the Senate’s “internal processes and its core principles”.

    Not that I would necessarily approve but maybe if Pres. Cory Aquino exhibited the trait that Sen. Noynoy is being accused of; the American bases would still be here.

    • Artemio says:

      Justice League,

      I don’t think anyone could have convinced them [...]

      This is an assumption. The reality of it is that either Cory was merely ineffective in justifying the retention of US bases OR the Senate merely reflected the popular sentiment of the rest of pinoy society OR both. This is why having an ineffective leader coupled with pinoy popular sentiment could prove to be unprogressive. Once again we are faced with an almost similar situation–an ineffective leader in the person of Noynoy coupled with the sway of popular sentiment working in tandem just like the ole’ days.

      A good leader is one who sways popular sentiments and is able to change them instead of being the one swayed by them.

      What happens if GMA is gone? Would Noynoy and Co. suggest another bogeyman to blame so people, with the help of the media of course, would continue to support him?

      • ilda says:

        Thanks Artemio

        You are right of course about the popular sentiment thing. I seem to recall a lot of grown-ups talking about the need to be independent from the Americans at that time.

        South Korea and Japan both have US military bases but they still managed to develop and grow as a nation without losing their identity. In fact, their national identities are still so strong today

        Cheers! :)

    • ilda says:

      @Justice League

      Six people were injured because of the rally. My goodness. See what I’m saying here?

      She didn’t try hard enough to convince the senators inside a building, as in, in an enclosed, secure area where they could have debated about it.

      What I’m trying to say is, even BongV can come up with convincing arguments without resorting to using people power.

      I don’t really agree that Noynoy will not resort to such tactics because I saw him being interviewed on TV and he said that if there is a failure of elections, we will see another people power.

      Happy Easter too!

  13. justice league says:

    Artemio,

    The reality of it is that either Cory was merely ineffective in justifying the retention of US bases OR the Senate merely reflected the popular sentiment of the rest of pinoy society OR both.

    What the heck!

    How the heck is it that your “reality” is actually reality when you don’t even know which of which is which or even if its both?

    A good leader is one who sways popular sentiments and is able to change them instead of being the one swayed by them.

    Then be my guest and congratulate those Senate members who voted against retention because they definitely did not let the popular sentiment sway their vote.

    Ilda,

    Thanks Artemio You are right of course about the popular sentiment thing. I seem to recall a lot of grown-ups talking about the need to be independent from the Americans at that time.

    “Opinion polls have indicated that a majority of the Filipino people support the continued presence of U.S. forces in the country, largely because of the enormous importance of the base to the nation’s fragile economy.”

    http://articles.latimes.com/1991-09-16/news/mn-1690_1_subic-bay-naval-base

    Six people were injured because of the rally. My goodness. See what I’m saying here? She didn’t try hard enough to convince the senators inside a building, as in, in an enclosed, secure area where they could have debated about it.

    No I don’t see.

    Six people were injured because a bomb was planted outside the enclosed and secure area where she tried to convince the Senate members. And the demonstration was pro retention so those injured were for retention of the bases.

    What I’m trying to say is, even BongV can come up with convincing arguments without resorting to using people power.

    I say you’re the one now dragging another AP author into this.

    Those Senate members had closed minds already.

    Even Sen. Enrile who obviously know how important the American forces were to our security voted against retention.

    Pres. Cory Aquino tried what she could but the Senate could not be swayed.

    Opinion polls showed that the Filipino people were in favor of retention but the Senate could not be swayed.

    Pres. Cory Aquino called on people power to show the Senate that the opinion polls clearly reflected the sentiments of the people but the Senate could not be swayed. Their minds were closed!

    • ilda says:

      Justice League

      There wouldn’t be a rally in the first place if Cory did not organise it. Obviously, the people who planted the bomb must have known that there were going to be a lot of people in that venue and wanted to maximise the number of hurt or injured.

      I still think that she kept using people power unnecessarily without thinking of the consequences. She even regretted using it with Erap.

      • Artemio says:

        On one hand, Cory was pushing for a referendum, but went further by rallying the people against the Senate. Also, the problem with removing the bases (sooner) is the number of jobs that would be lost because of this. There were no concrete alternatives or safety nets yet in place for these people.

        But on the other hand, the sentimental outlook or euphoria at the time was that the Philippines “became truly democratic” (or was liberated from a dictatorial form of gov’t), hence, like a teenager who just turned 18, the Philippines now had a chance for real independence–i.e. to “forge its own destiny” without the oppressive forces of any dictatorial or foreign power.

        The Senate were elected by the people through a democratic process with the expectation that they would look after the people’s best interest. Now, among the jobs that thrive on US presence in the PI is prostitution. This is a sore spot for a country who proudly claims to be the Catholic/Christian country in Asia with a conservative culture. US presence appears to have a corrosive effect on our moral fiber. Also, the US neither affirmed nor denied the presence of nuclear weapons in any of their bases. Moreover, there was a sense that Pinoy society would not learn to be truly independent as long as it continues to rely on US presence for its economy. It is likely that, while removing US bases may be harmful at first, the Senate sees that it would ultimately serve the people’s best interest in the long run. The Senate saw to it, rightly or wrongly, that the common good, over the long term, takes precedence over any immediate benefits such presence might have.

        If the Senate’s decision was perceived to have absolutely zero merit to it or was merely arbitrary, then Pinoys would have been less ambivalent about supporting Cory.

      • ilda says:

        Interesting insights Artemio.

        Again, it boils down to our insecurity and the Filipino sense of misguided pride. What seemed like a good idea then resulted in a lot of suffering for a lot of people. It is so baffling to think that they wanted the US military out as soon as possible without even thinking of the repercussions. Filipinos have never been good at planning ever since. The famous bahala na attitude was at play.

        I wonder why the women in South Korea and Japan do not take advantage of the US military presence to sell their flesh. Our repressive culture tends to breed bad behaviour rather than good behaviour.

    • Artemio says:

      Justice League:

      What the heck!

      How the heck is it that your “reality” is actually reality when you don’t even know which of which is which or even if its both?

      No problem at my end knowing “which is which.” My statement was for your own personal edification. Unless you’re logically challenged, you wouldn’t miss the dilemma clearly laid out for you.

      Then be my guest and congratulate those Senate members who voted against retention because they definitely did not let the popular sentiment sway their vote.

      Nope. You might want to go out more often. Having just been freed from a dictatorship through a turn of events that many consider to be miraculous, people felt empowered to such an extent that their sense of independence and nationhood were reinforced–They believe that if they can make miracles like Edsa 1 happen, they can become self-sufficient with little or no need for US bases purported to be keeping nuclear arsenals somewhere within its walls and unnecessarily inviting tension between the PI & its Asian neighbors. A people acting as one voice seem to make us transcend natural boundaries–it was euphoric–that was the sentiment during those times, otherwise, the majority would have [eventually] supported Cory’s street protest and overpowered the Senate’s position were it considered popularly unacceptable.

      “Opinion polls have indicated that a majority of the Filipino people support the continued presence of U.S. forces in the country, largely because of the enormous importance of the base to the nation’s fragile economy.”

      http://articles.latimes.com/1991-09-16/news/mn-1690_1_subic-bay-naval-base

      Jeez, another of those “opinion polls” as if they were very reliable. Nice googling though.

  14. brianitus says:

    Hi.

    Nice post.

    I am evil. LOL.

  15. justice league says:

    Ilda,

    There wouldn’t be a rally in the first place if Cory did not organise it.

    That issue is not contested.

    Like I stated, she wanted to show the Senate that the opinion polls clearly reflected the sentiments of the people. And the Filipino people were for retention.

    Artemio,

    On one hand, Cory was pushing for a referendum,

    She knew the people were in favor of the U.S. bases and the opinion polls showed it.

    but went further by rallying the people against the Senate.

    Against? That’s an interesting choice of word.

    I’d say she rallied the people to show the senate the people were for retention.

    My statement was for your own personal edification.

    Well thanks for the concern.

    You might want to go out more often.

    Thanks for the advice but I get enough sunshine on my own.

    Having just been freed from a dictatorship through a turn of events that many consider to be miraculous, people felt empowered to such an extent that their sense of independence and nationhood were reinforced–They believe that if they can make miracles like Edsa 1 happen, they can become self-sufficient with little or no need for US bases purported to be keeping nuclear arsenals somewhere within its walls and unnecessarily inviting tension between the PI & its Asian neighbors. A people acting as one voice seem to make us transcend natural boundaries–it was euphoric–that was the sentiment during those times, otherwise, the majority would have [eventually] supported Cory’s street protest and overpowered the Senate’s position were it considered popularly unacceptable.

    But on the other hand, the sentimental outlook or euphoria at the time was that the Philippines “became truly democratic” (or was liberated from a dictatorial form of gov’t), hence, like a teenager who just turned 18, the Philippines now had a chance for real independence–i.e. to “forge its own destiny” without the oppressive forces of any dictatorial or foreign power.

    Sheesh. You make it read as if the Senate vote was immediately after EDSA I.

    The fact is that the vote was taken some 5 years afterwards. In the span of that time, the Philippines suffered a devastating Earthquake, the eruption of a long dormant volcano (which even drove the Americans to abandon one of their large overseas airbase), numerous attempted coups (for which Pres. Aquino had to ask American help against the rebel forces), ….

    I say you stretched that euphoria too thin.

    Jeez, another of those “opinion polls” as if they were very reliable. Nice googling though.

    You should try it.

    Maybe you can find reliable sources that will back up your claims like “the Senate merely reflected the POPULAR sentiment of the rest of pinoy society”.

    It is likely that, while removing US bases may be harmful at first, the Senate sees that it would ultimately serve the people’s best interest in the long run. The Senate saw to it, rightly or wrongly, that the common good, over the long term, takes precedence over any immediate benefits such presence might have.

    Oh heck!

    If you think the Senate thought that way; why the heck in the first place are you blaming Pres. Aquino for the decision of the Senate?

    Unless you’re logically challenged, you wouldn’t miss the dilemma clearly laid out for you.

    You should worry about your own logic.

    You’re blaming Pres. Cory Aquino for being ineffectual in swaying the Senate decision that the Senate made because (as you claim) the Senate believed their decision was for the “people’s best interest in the long run” and “the common good, over the long term”.

    Like I said; Their minds were closed.

    And you just proved that their minds were closed for (as you claim) the people’s best interest and the common good.

    • ilda says:

      Hi Justice

      Like I stated, she wanted to show the Senate that the opinion polls clearly reflected the sentiments of the people. And the Filipino people were for retention.

      If I had been in her shoes, I would have just collected signatures or petitions from Filipinos who were in favour of the retention. It would have been simpler, safer and fussy free.

      The problem with the late president Cory was that she got addicted to using people power. Perhaps it was euphoric being in the centre of it but it put a lot of people’s lives at risk and not to mention the disruption in businesses.

  16. Wikipedia says:

    I would just like to comment about citing Wikipedia as a source.

    FYI, Wikipedia is a FFA site wherein almost anyone can edit the information held within it.

    It’s a valuable tool and yes, can be informative- but please do not just take everything you see within it as fact..

    There’s a reason why most schools won’t accept Wikipedia as a source for research and school papers.

    • ilda says:

      Hi Wikipedia

      I am quite aware of that. That is why in my article I actually stated “Feel free to debunk these claims”.

      Anyway, the actual quote from Wikipedia was not the point of the whole article. The quote was merely to emphasize that the economy is not doing that bad under the Arroyo administration. Likewise, the fact that no one has contested the claims confirms that the data is not incorrect.

      Welcome to AP :)

  17. justice league says:

    Ilda,

    If I had been in her shoes, I would have just collected signatures or petitions from Filipinos who were in favour of the retention. It would have been simpler, safer and fussy free.

    How long would that process take?

    How many signatures would you have planned to collect?

    Do you think the Senate would have been swayed by the petition given that (based on Artemio) the Senate decided on what they thought to be the “people’s best interest in the long run” and “the common good, over the long term”?

    How about “sell their flesh”, what impact would the petition have on the Senate vote given that you agreed with Artemio that the issue of prostitution was part in deciding the “people’s best interest in the long run” and “the common good, over the long term”?

    • ilda says:

      Justice,

      Well, based on the info you provided yourself, the Senate did not get swayed by the rally or people power either. This therefore confirms Artemio’s claims.

      Considering Cory had a lot of supporters, it would have been easy to collect a petition with their help. It’s still the simplest and safest. Organizing rallies is just a sign of desperation like a mob mentality.

      What’s so odd is that given the number of people injured in that incident, Cory still did not learn from what happened but instead, kept organizing more rallies in later years.

      There are other democratic ways of demonstrating dissatisfaction without resorting to such tactics. One of them is voting for the right people into office to begin with.

  18. guilbautedsookie says:

    Maybe what he means by good is that he is a “good” boy doing all these things for Filipinos. Sad to say, I am not swayed. I worked hard to get what I have and for him to promise the poor to lift them from poverty is a huge joke. They all promised that and it has never happened. How about us in the middle class? Aren’t we worth equal attention too?

    • ilda says:

      Noynoy said that nobody listens to debates. I guess nobody told him that people who belong to the middle class do listen. When he said “It’s not our target market”, it meant the thinking class is not his target market. He knows that the population of the thinking class is negligible.

    • brianitus says:

      http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/business/06/13/09/rp-middle-class-shrinking-even-crisis

      Pasali din ha.

      Um, the middle class is shrinking, daw. So, bakit ka nila papansinin? Andun daw ang botante eh. The way I see it, the middle class is “fragmented” on who they want to go for.

      Tingin ko lang, in terms of getting a good ROI on campaign funds, why waste it on a smaller “thinking” segment when you can get a larger crowd emotionally charged enough to vote for you? The problem na nga lang nya is how long can he hold on to the emotionally charged mob. We’ll find out in May 2010

      Cheers!

  19. justice league says:

    Hi Ilda,

    Well, based on the info you provided yourself, the Senate did not get swayed by the rally or people power either. This therefore confirms Artemio’s claims.

    Artemio made a lot of claims. Some of which contradict each other. So which of his claims did I confirm?

    His claims include that removing the US bases may be harmful at first, but the Senate sees that it would ultimately serve the people’s best interest in the long run and that the Senate saw to it, rightly or wrongly, that the common good, over the long term, takes precedence over any immediate benefits such presence might have.

    He also claimed that Pres. Cory Aquino was merely ineffective in justifying the retention of US bases to the Senate.

    Given Artemio’s claims about the Senate; Pres. Aquino was on an impossible mission and failing therefore was not her fault.

    Artemio also claimed that the Senate merely reflected the popular sentiment of the rest of pinoy society.

    I disagreed with that. I “googled” and presented proof from other sources that backs up my claim.

    He hasn’t presented any.

    Considering Cory had a lot of supporters, it would have been easy to collect a petition with their help. It’s still the simplest and safest.

    And that petition would have amounted to what against a Senate that Artemio envisioned to have decided to vote the way it did?

    Let’s just say the Senate would have taken cognizance of that petition. Surely the Senate would have had each and every signature verified. You claimed that “Cory” had a lot of supporters to collect the petition. So how many supporters does the Senate have to verify the signatures on the petition?

    Which of these Senate “supporters” will conduct the verification? The Senate “supporters” who are in favor of the bases retention or those who are against it?

    Organizing rallies is just a sign of desperation like a mob mentality.

    Thank Goodness you didn’t write the Constitution.

    What’s so odd is that given the number of people injured in that incident, Cory still did not learn from what happened but instead, kept organizing more rallies in later years.

    Most unfortunate. But those bombings are likely the work of terrorists. That’s what they do. They terrorize! There are times when one must be prudent. There are times when the terror must be faced.

    There are other democratic ways of demonstrating dissatisfaction without resorting to such tactics. One of them is voting for the right people into office to begin with.

    What is the right one for one might not be the right one for the other.

    But with elections every 3 years for local positions and half of the Senate and 6 years for the President and Vice-President; aside from signing petitions, that’s really quite a long time for you to demonstrate your dissatisfaction.

    And please do remember that the power of recall does not extend over the legislative branch, the VP and the President and that the power of the ballot does not cover all officials that one might wish to demonstrate dissatisfaction to.

    Happy Easter.

    • ilda says:

      Justice,

      Let’s start again, shall we?

      These are my beliefs:

      1. Cory did not have to use people power because she could have used strong arguments in front of the Senators instead.

      2. Cory could have just collected petitions from everyone to prove that majority wanted the retention of the bases (if it really was true that majority wanted it).

      3. Since Cory resorted to people power, this meant that she was ineffective as a stateswoman.

      Since I was still young then, I can only go by what I recall was the popular sentiment which was the boot out the US military. I had uncles and teachers who kept convincing the students that we needed our independence.

      Now, one of my fave commenters, Artemio said that:

      1. Booting out the US military was the popular sentiment then.
      2. Cory was on an impossible mission because of item number one.

      Therefore, based on my recollections and Artemio’s assertions, people power or no people power, the Senators have already made up their minds.

      Again, Cory should have realised this and should have not called for people to come out of the street and risk their lives.

    • Artemio says:

      @Justice League

      Well, based on the info you provided yourself, the Senate did not get swayed by the rally or people power either. This therefore confirms Artemio’s claims.

      Why would they? Are they sure that mob out there represent the whole country? This is the problem with Cory’s approach. She reduced it to a battle of wills instead of addressing the reasons (in or of the Senate) behind why the bases should or should not be retained.

      Artemio made a lot of claims. Some of which contradict each other.

      Who’s contradicting who? To be fair to both sides (Senate and Cory,) I was trying to lay out both their sides of the issue, so of course, since these sides are opposed, you should expect them to form a picture in which they “contradict” each other.

      So which of his claims did I confirm?

      His claims include that removing the US bases may be harmful at first, but the Senate sees that it would ultimately serve the people’s best interest in the long run and that the Senate saw to it, rightly or wrongly, that the common good, over the long term, takes precedence over any immediate benefits such presence might have.

      Simple really. It’s like diet. You lose a few for a longer term gain. You struggling with this concept?

      He also claimed that Pres. Cory Aquino was merely ineffective in justifying the retention of US bases to the Senate.

      Given Artemio’s claims about the Senate; Pres. Aquino was on an impossible mission and failing therefore was not her fault.

      No, it was not impossible. This is your assumption. Cory should have addressed and provided alternative solutions to the concerns raised in the Senate–which is what effective Presidents do, and not merely reduce it to a battle of wills.

      Artemio also claimed that the Senate merely reflected the popular sentiment of the rest of pinoy society.

      I disagreed with that. I “googled” and presented proof from other sources that backs up my claim.

      Sheesh Mr Justice League, if polls (which are only what your link was able to provide) constitute the final word on facts, then we should just be conducting polls and not bother with going through with the actual elections.

      He hasn’t presented any.

      You’re talking like an outsider far removed from the society whose sentiments you are trying to interpret (Which is why I suggested that you go out more often and immerse yourself in the crowd.)

      Now just mentioning these few examples, tell me whether these concerns (or considerations) of the Senate do not necessarily reflect those of the people during that period.
      - The US is perceived to have supported Marcos during his dictatorship. It did not even fair well with Filipinos that the Reagans and Marcoses were too cozy with each other.
      - With the rest of the ASEAN, we are trying to make ours a nuclear free zone, but what was their popular response then? — “We would neither confirm nor deny the presence of nuclear weapons in the US bases.” This is not an answer that sits well among the Filipinos. Jeez, until now it is not even easy to convince the rest of the population to go nuclear as an alternative energy source, given their fear of an esoteric technology.
      -Then there are some: http://www.yonip.com/main/articles/september_16.html

      Guess what? People may even be forced to agree on the retention of US bases perhaps due to [economic] circumstances, but when we actually talk about real sentiments, given a choice or if at all possible, they’d rather be completely independent.

      Just an aside, but sadly, it begins to appear that Cory would rather satisfy with short term solutions as this would have presented a nicer picture within her own term of office.

  20. justice league says:

    Ilda,

    Let’s start again, shall we?

    Very well.

    These are my beliefs: 1. Cory did not have to use people power because she could have used strong arguments in front of the Senators instead.

    Part of Artemio’s assertion was the issue of prostitution and that the US neither affirmed nor denied the presence of nuclear weapons in any of their bases and was keeping nuclear arsenals somewhere within its walls and unnecessarily inviting tension between the PI & its Asian neighbors.

    Since you always like to claim on what you’d do if you were in her shoes; you can go ahead now and give us your strong arguments that she should have used on the Senate to convince it based on the issues above.

    2. Cory could have just collected petitions from everyone to prove that majority wanted the retention of the bases (if it really was true that majority wanted it).

    OK. Now I’m the one who’s going to request to start again.

    And that petition would have amounted to what against a Senate that Artemio envisioned to have decided to vote the way it did?

    Let’s just say the Senate would have taken cognizance of that petition. Surely the Senate would have had each and every signature verified. You claimed that “Cory” had a lot of supporters to collect the petition. So how many supporters does the Senate have to verify the signatures on the petition?

    Which of these Senate “supporters” will conduct the verification? The Senate “supporters” who are in favor of the bases retention or those who are against it?

    Since I was still young then, I can only go by what I recall was the popular sentiment which was the boot out the US military. I had uncles and teachers who kept convincing the students that we needed our independence.

    What you are recalling is not supported by independent proof. Normally I would let that what you recall go by but I presented proof that contradicts the “popular sentiment” that you recall. How many uncles and teachers are you talking about here? Will they even come up to a thousand?

    Maybe you should try “googling” also.

    Now, one of my fave commenters, Artemio said that: 1. Booting out the US military was the popular sentiment then.

    Which again like you; he has not supported with independent proof.

    2. Cory was on an impossible mission because of item number one.

    I believe that one was mine; which was based however on Artemio’s statements.

    … the Senators have already made up their minds.

    And how the heck is that different from what I’ve been saying that “Their minds were closed.”?

    Again, Cory should have realised this and should have not called for people to come out of the street and risk their lives.

    Martin Luther King Jr., Ghandi, ……….. even Sen. Richard Gordon believed in calling for rallies/demonstrations.

    And you really should stop exploiting the injuries and the risking of lives already.

    Everybody already knows that even if all the rallies that “Cory” called for ended peacefully or even if the rally she organized was able to sway the vote of the Senate into accepting the treaty; it won’t make a difference as to what you view organizing a rally is.

    You said it yourself that “Organizing rallies is just a sign of desperation like a mob mentality.” so no matter if the rally was peaceful or even peaceful and successful; it doesn’t matter as to how you view a rally. So stop exploiting any untoward incidents in rallies already.

    • ilda says:

      JL,

      It is so easy to justify the retention of the bases, just ask the Senators the following:

      1. What was their basis for saying they were hiding nuclear weapons inside the US bases?
      2. Tell the Senators that part of the new lease agreement would be to conduct mandatory inspections of the US bases.
      3. Ask the Senators if they have any alternative jobs for the people who will lose their jobs after they pull-out.
      4. Ask the Senators why they thought we could never achieve real independence if the US military didn’t pull-out. How can they prove we will achieve economic independence after they leave? Were we dependent so much on their rent? The US military was only in the country leasing out space, they were not running the Philippine government, were they meddling? Where’s the evidence? I believe we can achieve independence even if they were still in the country. Just look at South Korea and Japan.

      Failing to convince the Senators to retain the US military bases was Cory’s fault because she was the President at that time and there’s such a thing as command responsibility. It was her responsibility to convince everyone. She failed to do it and suffered the consequences.

      Having said that, I can actually believe that the popular sentiment then was to boot out the US military because I don’t think that the estimated 100k people who joined Cory to rally is enough indication to say that the popular sentiment then was to retain it.

      The petition would have been better because it is safer. People power should not be used again if you ask me. Filipinos just need to vote their President, their senators, their congressmen and their mayors wisely. If they do, they don’t ever have to use people power to remove anyone out of office again and they don’t ever have to use it to as a tactic to convince anyone about anything. Things have improved elsewhere since Martin Luther King Jr and Ghandi. Every time there are mobs or large number of people gathering around outside the streets, there’s always a risk of someone getting hurt so I simply cannot stop emphasizing it enough.

  21. justice league says:

    Ilda,

    1. What was their basis for saying they were hiding nuclear weapons inside the US bases?

    According to one of your FAVE commenters, Artemio, the US neither affirmed nor denied the presence of nuclear weapons in any of their bases. And that obviously was enough basis for the Senate to vote the way they did on the treaty on that issue

    3. Ask the Senators if they have any alternative jobs for the people who will lose their jobs after they pull-out.

    Well based on your fave commenter Artemio; “the problem with removing the bases (sooner) is the number of jobs that would be lost because of this. There were no concrete alternatives or safety nets yet in place for these people.”

    Yet the Senate voted the way it did as according to your fave commenter Artemio; “It is likely that, while removing US bases may be harmful at first, the Senate sees that it would ultimately serve the people’s best interest in the long run.”

    So simply, the Senate didn’t care whether there were any alternative jobs or not for the people who will lose their jobs after they pull-out and the Senate would have still voted to reject the treaty.

    4. Ask the Senators why they thought we could never achieve real independence if the US military didn’t pull-out. How can they prove we will achieve economic independence after they leave? Were we dependent so much on their rent? The US military was only in the country leasing out space, they were not running the Philippine government, were they meddling? Where’s the evidence?

    Plain and simple. WHATEVER your uncles and teachers were telling the students to convince them that we needed our independence will be a good enough answer by the Senate to you!

    2. Tell the Senators that part of the new lease agreement would be to conduct mandatory inspections of the US bases.

    Now you are in a bind on this one.

    The treaty has already been made. The issue before the Senate on the vote was to either accept or reject the treaty.

    If these mandatory inspections of the U.S. bases are not included in the treaty; then you are lying to the Senate.

    Can you please show everyone proof that there are indeed these mandatory inspections of the U.S. bases in the treaty. I’m sure everyone is interested in seeing your evidence on this.

    Failing to convince the Senators to retain the US military bases was Cory’s fault because she was the President at that time and there’s such a thing as command responsibility. It was her responsibility to convince everyone. She failed to do it and suffered the consequences.

    According to you, the popular sentiment of the people was to boot out the US military as your uncles and teachers kept convincing the students that we needed our independence and that the Senators have already made up their minds.

    Yet it is still the fault of Pres. Aquino that she was unable to convince Senators WHO HAVE ALREADY MADE UP THEIR MINDS?

    Sheesh!

    Having said that, I can actually believe that the popular sentiment then was to boot out the US military because I don’t think that the estimated 100k people who joined Cory to rally is enough indication to say that the popular sentiment then was to retain it.

    That is backed by several polls that show the Filipinos were in favor of retention. I have shown you proof. And you and your fave commenter haven’t shown anything!

    Filipinos just need to vote their President, their senators, their congressmen and their mayors wisely. If they do, they don’t ever have to use people power to remove anyone out of office again and they don’t ever have to use it to as a tactic to convince anyone about anything. Things have improved elsewhere since Martin Luther King Jr and Ghandi.

    Can you please give me at least 3 democratic countries where people don’t ever have to use rallies/demonstrations as a tactic to convince anyone about anything?

    Every time there are mobs or large number of people gathering around outside the streets, there’s always a risk of someone getting hurt so I simply cannot stop emphasizing it enough.

    NO MORE PARADES!!!

    I enjoyed Easter. Hope you enjoyed it too.

    • ilda says:

      JL

      The lease was up for renewal at that time Mr League and this means they could have definitely asked the Americans to sign new terms and conditions. One of the conditions could have been my proposal for a mandatory inspection of the US military facilities. They just didn’t have enough muscle and capacity to come up with this kind of simple solution. I don’t understand why problems always have to be solved by one big drastic move like your favourite people power solution. It’s all or nothing all the time.

      When someone neither confirms nor denies the presence of anything, then all you end up with is merely speculation. You cannot base your decisions on speculation alone. Tsismis ang labas nuon! The Senators should have demanded for an inspection if they weren’t satisfied.

      Medyo malabo yung sagot mo sa proposal ko na ito:

      4. Ask the Senators why they thought we could never achieve real independence if the US military didn’t pull-out. How can they prove we will achieve economic independence after they leave? Were we dependent so much on their rent? The US military was only in the country leasing out space, they were not running the Philippine government, were they meddling? Where’s the evidence?

      Ano ba naman itong sagot mo:

      Plain and simple. WHATEVER your uncles and teachers were telling the students to convince them that we needed our independence will be a good enough answer by the Senate to you!

      I wasn’t talking about my uncles and teachers who were against the US bases. I was talking about the Senators. Ultimately, it was the Senators who had the power to vote for or against it. My arguments were for the Senators. Hinde pala ganun katalino ang mga Senators natin? Pwede rin maging senators and uncles and teachers ko! You asked me to come up with arguments but when I did, you didn’t even acknowledge them to be valid.

      Parades are different from people power revolutions/rallies because the latter is obviously politically motivated while the other one is merely celebratory. When it’s politically motivated, there is a good likelihood that there will be attacks from those who oppose such moves, not that parades are any safer. Basta when there is a large gathering, people should attend it at their own risk. Irresponsible na lang yung katulad ni Cory who always wanted to organise one and encouraged people to come out despite the risks.

      While my arguments might make sense to the ordinary citizen, it won’t make sense to you because:

      1. You are a Cory fanatic.
      2. You are a people power fanatic.

      And really, it is just too difficult to argue over something that happened decades ago. The fact of the matter is, the immediate pull-out of the US military was devastating for the people and the economy; Cory failed in her capacity as a leader; and the senators also failed to look out for the interest of the people.

      Good day!

  22. justice league says:

    lda,

    You asked me to come up with arguments but when I did, you didn’t even acknowledge them to be valid.

    You presented 4 issues. I answered all 4 issues with valid arguments. I used your fave commenter Aretmio’s statement on 2 issues. I used your own statements on 1 and I questioned the validity of the remaining one as I required proof from you that what you planned to tell the Senate was actually included in the finished treaty.

    What kind of acknowledgement do you want?

    The lease was up for renewal at that time Mr League and this means they could have definitely asked the Americans to sign new terms and conditions. One of the conditions could have been my proposal for a mandatory inspection of the US military facilities.

    So in other words the initial argument that you presented wasn’t really included in the treaty.

    So now your argument is that it should have been part of the treaty.

    One of the conditions could have been my proposal for a mandatory inspection of the US military facilities. They just didn’t have enough muscle and capacity to come up with this kind of simple solution.

    If that is your contention; then can you please show at least 3 countries that had enough muscle and capacity to wangle that kind of concession from the Americans?

    Are you going to be presenting proof now or is your answer going to based again on personal accounts only?

    When someone neither confirms nor denies the presence of anything, then all you end up with is merely speculation. You cannot base your decisions on speculation alone. Tsismis ang labas nuon!

    You can bring that up with your fave commenter Artemio when he comes back because he was the one that brought up that issue as to how the Senate voted

    Senators should have demanded for an inspection if they weren’t satisfied.

    Then that problem is with the Senate and not with the Executive.

    Medyo malabo yung sagot mo sa proposal ko na ito: …. Ano ba naman itong sagot mo: ….

    That is a valid answer.

    Either you can’t find the valid answer or you don’t want to find it.

    I wasn’t talking about my uncles and teachers who were against the US bases. I was talking about the Senators. Ultimately, it was the Senators who had the power to vote for or against it. My arguments were for the Senators. Hinde pala ganun katalino ang mga Senators natin?

    What the heck?

    Didn’t you read your fave commenter Artemio’s issue that “the problem with removing the bases (sooner) is the number of jobs that would be lost because of this. There were no concrete alternatives or safety nets yet in place for these people.”

    Yet the Senate still voted the way it did and you’re still asking how bright or not those Senators were?

    Pwede rin maging senators and uncles and teachers ko!

    Offhand I’d say yes. Maybe you should read the requirements to run for the Senate in the Constitution.

    But if you have such low regard for your relatives and the teachers who taught you; then what does that make you?

    Like I said, there is a valid answer when I used what you personally recall as an answer to your own argument.

    And that is that; your uncles and your teachers actually came up with valid arguments to convince the students that we needed our independence. (Are you still going to bring up how bright or not bright our Senators were when they rejected the treaty?)

    Heck, they were your uncles and your teachers. So you were a definitely a student like the rest of the students. You obviously heard what your uncles and teachers had to say. You tell us what you heard.

    But I can cut what you personally recall in several other ways and you will bleed each and everytime.

    If your uncles and teachers gave out crappy arguments to convince the students and the students didn’t know better and were convinced; then the students were dumb and stupid. If you were convinced with their crappy arguments; then what does that make you?

    If however you and the other students weren’t convinced with their crappy arguments, why is it that you claim that the popular sentiment was to boot out the US military? What did you people do when you people knew that the arguments presented to you were crappy?

    If however all the other students were convinced with their crappy arguments but you weren’t; what did you do when you knew that the arguments presented to you were crappy? Did you leave your other fellow students to be fooled by the crappy arguments of your teachers?

    (Btw, don’t bother trying to spin this as some sort of “Filipino is damned if he does this and damned if he does the opposite”. I left a positive outcome wherein your uncle and your teachers actually came out with valid arguments.)

    Parades are different from people power revolutions/rallies because the latter is obviously politically motivated while the other one is merely celebratory. When it’s politically motivated, there is a good likelihood that there will be attacks from those who oppose such moves, not that parades are any safer. Basta when there is a large gathering, people should attend it at their own risk. Irresponsible na lang yung katulad ni Cory who always wanted to organise one and encouraged people to come out despite the risks.

    Now Sen. Richard Gordon himself led rallies in support of the bases retention. He also knew the risks for those he called out.

    Yet when now ex-Pres. Estrada ordered him evicted then as SBMA chairman; what did he do?

    He organized his own people power. Guess how many got injured when then President Estrada sent in the police and commandos?

    Every rally that he attends to for his campaign is politically motivated, with a chance of those opposed to attack.

    So, according to your basis; Sen. Richard Gordon is IRRESPONSIBLE!

    I dare you Ilda, TO TELL THE ANTIPINOY COMMUNITY NOT TO VOTE FOR SEN. GORDON BECAUSE ACCORDING TO YOUR BASIS; HE IS IRRESPONSIBLE!

    While my arguments might make sense to the ordinary citizen, it won’t make sense to you because: 1. You are a Cory fanatic. 2. You are a people power fanatic.

    Maybe I am, maybe I’m not.

    One of your Grand Preachers in Antipinoy.com likes to say “And failing to find an equally objective counter-argument, we tend to shrink back to the comfy world of credentialism; i.e. using the messengers’ credentials (or in this case, perceived lack of credentials) as the basis for a validation or, in this case, invalidation of his/her expressed views.”

    I hurl his words now at you.

    But definitely; I don’t need to be a “Cory” fanatic to defend her against your blame on the Senate rejection of the American Bases treaty.

    Goodnight Pres. Ilda.

    • ilda says:

      Hi Justice

      How’s your day been? It looks like it’s just you and me now buddy :)

      Well, I probably would make a good president If I do say so myself. It’s just like running a household, really. You just gotta hire the right helpers and have the guts to get rid of inefficient ones once you notice that they are not doing their jobs right. And not to mention, you gotta have the right thinking skills so people around you won’t try to manipulate you.

      It doesn’t matter if Cory, Gordon or Gloria used people power in the past. It still does not make it “cool” to use it to solve issues. So what if Gordon used it before? I know he’s not perfect. I don’t have to agree with everything he does or say to think that he is a better candidate than Noynoy. I know he gets things done because you can see the results. Hopefully, he won’t use it again. I’d be very disappointed if he does.

      At the end of the day, it really does not matter what tactic one uses as long as it works and as long as it is legal. It applies to anyone. It even applies to Noynoy with his sympathy game and with Villar and his advertising. But if something is repeatedly done but produces the same old tired results, one just has to let that tactic go and keep it locked away. We have to allow ourselves to mature as a nation and stop using people power already. Why do we bother with elections if we’ll just end up on the streets anyway to get rid of whoever president we want booted out?

      Cory kept using people power right up until she was too sick to do it. I think that was insane. She didn’t learn from her experience during the rally for the US military bases and she didn’t learn from her mistake with Erap. She even used it again with Gloria. You have to conclude she was irrational most of the time. She was just lucky that majority of her supporters thought the same way too (or didn’t use their heads) that’s why she was popular.

      As to the other points you mentioned, they have become too obscure already to discuss again. My points were that the Senators then were not for the retention of the bases and that Cory was inefficient. You can’t get any clearer than that.

  23. justice league says:

    Ilda,

    How’s your day been?

    Quite fine. Thanks for asking.

    It looks like it’s just you and me now buddy

    Yeah. It’s been that way for days now.

    At least it wasn’t my fave commenter that upped and left.

    Well, I probably would make a good president If I do say so myself. It’s just like running a household, really. You just gotta hire the right helpers and have the guts to get rid of inefficient ones once you notice that they are not doing their jobs right. And not to mention, you gotta have the right thinking skills so people around you won’t try to manipulate you.

    Well do remember that the Senate is a different household so how does your plan work there?

    It doesn’t matter if Cory, Gordon or Gloria used people power in the past. It still does not make it “cool” to use it to solve issues. So what if Gordon used it before? I know he’s not perfect. I don’t have to agree with everything he does or say to think that he is a better candidate than Noynoy. I know he gets things done because you can see the results.

    Then you should go for Nicanor Perlas. He brings results too.

    Since you’re against a gathering of large group of people with political motivation with good likelihood that there will be attacks from those who oppose such moves; PERLAS IS YOUR MAN.

    The only thing going against him is “political motivation”.

    (I hate to do that to Mr. Perlas but since I’m telling you to vote for him; that should make Perlas and I even. Unfortunately, I won’t vote for him; can’t get pass his abortion thingy.)

    Hopefully, he won’t use it again. I’d be very disappointed if he does.

    Then get your handkerchief ready with lots of tissue paper to boot.

    Like I previously said, every rally that Sen. Gordon attends to for his campaign is politically motivated, with a chance of those opposed to attack.

    Why do we bother with elections if we’ll just end up on the streets anyway to get rid of whoever president we want booted out?

    Lady, you keep equating “People Power” with booting someone or something out.

    The “People Power” Pres. Aquino called for before the Senate vote wasn’t for booting out any Senate member nor getting rid of the Senate.

    She didn’t learn from her experience during the rally for the US military bases and she didn’t learn from her mistake with Erap.

    Do point that out again the next time Sen. Gordon attends another one of his political rallies.

    As to the other points you mentioned, they have become too obscure already to discuss again.

    I do understand. All that blood loss sure can’t be good for your memory.

    My points were that the Senators then were not for the retention of the bases

    I totally agree. And not a Pres. Ilda nor a Pres. Gordon would have made a difference.

    and that Cory was inefficient.

    Well, your argument above with regards to the Senators negates that one.

    Words of advice. Bandage your wounds and drink your Iron Supplement. I’d hate it if you’d lose your avatar face.

    Well I enjoyed our discussion. Hope you enjoyed it too.

    Bye Ilda.

    • ilda says:

      Oh, well. I can understand why you are bailing out Justice. It is hard to defend the actions a lot of our politicians. Especially since these politicians were elected by the Filipino people themselves.

      The politicians and the electorates make a lot of baffling decisions all the time :)

      BTW, Artemio responded to one of your comments above.

  24. justice league says:

    Artemio,

    Why would they? Are they sure that mob out there represent the whole country?

    How sure were they that it didn’t?

    This is the problem with Cory’s approach. She reduced it to a battle of wills instead of addressing the reasons (in or of the Senate) behind why the bases should or should not be retained.

    No, it was not impossible. This is your assumption. Cory should have addressed and provided alternative solutions to the concerns raised in the Senate–which is what effective Presidents do, and not merely reduce it to a battle of wills.

    Then Pres. Artemio, let’s see how you address the reasons. I’m sure everybody is interested in finding out how effective you would have been. And please do address everything you brought up already.

    Who’s contradicting who? To be fair to both sides (Senate and Cory,) I was trying to lay out both their sides of the issue, so of course, since these sides are opposed, you should expect them to form a picture in which they “contradict” each other.

    So you did that on purpose.

    Very well, so finally which is which then?

    Sheesh Mr Justice League, if polls constitute the final word on facts, then we should just be conducting polls and not bother with going through with the actual elections.

    That is so eerily similar to what Speaker De Venecia said some days before the elections till he sank in Estrada votes. (Btw, I voted for neither of them) Surveys provide a good outlook. Too bad the referendum didn’t happen then.

    Which is why I suggested that you go out more often and immerse yourself in the crowd.

    Then I’d probably get less sunshine.

    Now just mentioning these few examples, tell me whether these concerns (or considerations) of the Senate do not necessarily reflect those of the people during that period. The US is perceived to have supported Marcos during his dictatorship …, we are trying to make ours a nuclear free zone …, Guess what? People may even be forced to agree on the retention of US bases perhaps due to [economic] circumstances, but when we actually talk about real sentiments

    Well guess what? That’s no different from asking an OFW if he/she’s worried about his/her parents, spouse, children in his/her absence and then still answer that he/she’s still going abroad.

    Your concerns may or may not reflect those of the people during that period but the bottomline is that majority were for retention.

    http://www.yonip.com/main/articles/september_16.html

    Do you realize that the link you provided was on an article that placed the blame of the debacle of the treaty on the American side particularly Richard Armitage?

    If you believe that article, then why are you still blaming Pres. Aquino?

    Just an aside, but sadly, it begins to appear that Cory would rather satisfy with short term solutions as this would have presented a nicer picture within her own term of office.

    Your fan Ilda thinks that we can “achieve economic independence and independence even if they were still in the country. Just look at South Korea and Japan.”

    Pres. Aquino may have thought the same thing so things would not have stopped with short term solutions. If you want more specifics on that; then you can ask Ilda about it.

    Ilda,

    Well thanks for the heads up.

    Oh, well. I can understand why you are bailing out Justice.

    WTH.

    I thought you had enough already.

    Very well. Let’s continue.

    Besides, we get to see really how good your fave commenter Pres. Artemio is.

    But then maybe he should have just stayed “upped and left”.

    • ilda says:

      Justice League,

      There’s not much to argue about anymore actually. We have already established the following:

      1. Cory was for the extension of the lease of the US military bases. She used a rally/people power instead of sound arguments to try and convince the Senate to vote yes to the extension of the lease.

      2. The Senators voted against the extension.

      3. The popular sentiment then was:

      According to Artemio: No to the extension of the US military bases

      According to Justice League: Yes to the extension of the US military bases.

      I tend to agree with Artemio because of my own personal recollection of what people then thought was the right thing to do and also since the Senators voted against it, it is so obvious that it was the popular sentiment. I really don’t think we can keep debating about this because the mere fact that it wasn’t extended should tell you that it was a popular sentiment.

      4. Both Cory and the Senators had no idea or immediate solution for the problems or consequences after the US military pulled out, i.e., unemployment, abandoned facilities, etc.

      5. Cory was an ineffective president. Full Stop

    • Artemio says:

      @Justice League,

      Why would they? Are they sure that mob out there represent the whole country? How sure were they that it didn’t?

      This is precisely my point—why the Senate should not be swayed by rallying mobs out there. There were also those rallying for the ouster of US bases.

      Then Pres. Artemio, let’s see how you address the reasons. I’m sure everybody is interested in finding out how effective you would have been. And please do address everything you brought up already.

      It may not be just one but a combination of many different solutions. One thing for sure is that, first, I would not have emboldened the US or Richard Armitage to take a hard stance by staging rallies against the Senate while negotiations are still in progress or still could be made. She could have, at least superficially, presented a united front with the Senate, (although she wants to impress the US of her commitment as an ally.) You can’t blame the treaty for being persistently lopsided in favor of the US, given the boost of confidence Cory and mob had given them—this was simply a dumb move on her part. Mob rule seems to be her trademark and solution of choice. Not only is she, here, ineffective but adversely defective or counter-effective. If the US were so not emboldened, they would likely be pushed more into a position where they would have to make concessions or compromises. This could have led to a more “congenial” dialogue.

      Because I would consider the Senate’s underlying reasons, I also would have limited their presence to conventional weapons by asking the US to either leave their nukes outside Philippine territorial waters, given the US can simply carry them in, and launch them from, nuclear submarines (which can run over lengthy periods of time without refueling. These subs carry Polaris ICBMs and launch them from underwater) or in aircraft carriers and other types of ships that could carry nukes; or, as a last resort, simply sign a pact of non-disclosure or confidentiality keeping nuke presence hidden from our ASEAN neighbors (who may be our potential future invaders anyway). We have no assurance even today that there aren’t any nukes within the Philippines and its waters.

      Cory wasn’t even helpful in that, since Ninoy, they were suspected or perceived to be quite sympathetic towards communists.

      These are just off-the-cuff answers, but actually, the more one thinks about it, and thinking especially outside-the-box, there’d be more alternatives than could actually meet the eye. But then again, we are talking about simple-minded Prexies like Cory.

      So you did that on purpose.
      Very well, so finally which is which then?

      Did what on purpose? Trying to present both sides fairly?—Of course.

      That is so eerily similar to what Speaker De Venecia said some days before the elections till he sank in Estrada votes. (Btw, I voted for neither of them) Surveys provide a good outlook. Too bad the referendum didn’t happen then.

      So what now? Is that supposed to make my statement any less true? If surveys also indicate the extent of information pollers have to work with, or the reasons behind their choices, then we can surmise what the true public sentiments are, based on those polls alone. The bottom line is that, being either misled or forced to agree on something, whether it be in polls or in other areas of life do not automatically reflect the true sentiments of the public—I was expressing a simple psychological fact. The Senate may be closer to the true sentiments of the people. They went through lengthy consultations and deliberation (part of due process) and did not arrive at its decision arbitrarily. What you interpret as popular support for the retention of the US bases does not tell us much about what people would have opted for were they not voting under the impression that their ouster would result in either economic loss or loss of military support or a weakening of our national security. It’s practically like being forced to choose under duress.

      Then I’d probably get less sunshine.

      Very well. Suit yourself then.

      Well guess what? That’s no different from asking an OFW if he/she’s worried about his/her parents, spouse, children in his/her absence and then still answer that he/she’s still going abroad.

      Exactly my point—People make choices contrary to their true sentiments or preferences.

      Your concerns may or may not reflect those of the people during that period but the bottomline is that majority were for retention.

      Bottom line, again, is that poll results are neither reliable nor final, and may in fact conceal the compromises or concessions people have to make against their true sentiments.

      Do you realize that the link you provided was on an article that placed the blame of the debacle of the treaty on the American side particularly Richard Armitage?

      There are other factors mentioned aside from Richard Armitage that contributed to the ouster which you seem to conveniently gloss over. Why you seem led into thinking that blame should be placed on just one factor is beyond me, but this does not excuse Cory for being [also] ineffective.

      If you believe that article, then why are you still blaming Pres. Aquino?

      Just like I said, there were other factors aside from Richard Armitage mentioned in the article, some of which she could have taken into consideration. She could have, at least, appeared sympathetic towards the Senate’s (or people’s) underlying reasons. That would have been a more diplomatic rather than confrontational approach.

      Also, were she not as sympathetic towards certain communists like Joma Sison, whom she released scot-free from prison now residing somewhere in Utrecht, Netherlands, she could have also capitalized on their threat. Her administration had experienced several coups, perhaps even more so than today’s GMA’s admin, which indicates that she is far from having any real command or unanimous support from various constituencies. (Ineffective indeed—typical of a clueless figure head.)

      Your fan Ilda thinks that we can “achieve economic independence and independence even if they were still in the country. Just look at South Korea and Japan.”

      Well, I’m her fan too :)

      I submit that we have cultural & more complex issues (may require its own thread perhaps,) which our politics is simply a by-product of, which prevents us from being economically independent.

      But then maybe he should have just stayed “upped and left”.

      I’m avoiding the temptation of suggesting that to you. Where’s the fun in that?

  25. benign0 says:

    @ Ilda and Artemio,

    From my point of view, there seems to be only three points you two so articulately make:

    (1) Cory Aquino failed as a statesman in the challenge of persuading and influencing her Government and the Filipino people of the merits of renewing a lease agreement with the U.S. for the continued operation of military facilities in the Philippines;

    (2) While Gordon as mayor of Olongapo City may have resorted to rallying his constituents to get his message heard by the right ears, Cory Aquino as president having to resort to rallying in the street with a small mob just to get a message across was, to say the least, quite quaintly pathetic; and,

    (3) A street mob, no matter what its size, does not constitute sound evidence of a general public acceptance of an idea or cause that can translate to an action sanctioned by the state. You will always need due process and institutional channels (such as in plebiscites, elections, and the votes of duly-elected representatives in a legislative assembly such as Congress) to officially represent the public will.

    Indeed;

    It’s simple, really™ — though not for the small-minded.

    - ;)

  26. justice league says:

    Ilda,

    She used a rally/people power instead of sound arguments to try and convince the Senate to vote yes to the extension of the lease.

    As President Ilda, you haven’t proven what sound arguments would have worked.

    I tend to agree with Artemio because of my own personal recollection of what people then thought was the right thing to do

    I already asked you if your uncles and your teachers which you base personal recollection on would amount to even a thousand; and you couldn’t even answer it.

    and also since the Senators voted against it, it is so obvious that it was the popular sentiment.

    Second envelope.

    Both Cory and the Senators had no idea or immediate solution for the problems or consequences after the US military pulled out, i.e., unemployment, abandoned facilities, etc.

    Apparently she had. http://articles.latimes.com/1992-01-20/business/fi-394_1_philippines-base-aquino

    5. Cory was an ineffective president.

    Not on this issue. You haven’t proven that you’d do better.

    Full Stop

    Then start walking to the gas station.

    Benigno,

    Cory Aquino failed as a statesman in the challenge of persuading and influencing her Government and the Filipino people of the merits of renewing a lease agreement with the U.S. for the continued operation of military facilities in the Philippines;

    She didn’t have to persuade the Filipino People because it was pro-retention.

    You obviously want to show us how YOU as a statesman would have succeeded in the challenge of persuading and influencing your Government and the Filipino people of the merits of renewing a lease agreement with the U.S. for the continued operation of military facilities in the Philippines.

    So go ahead and show us.

    You will always need due process and institutional channels (such as in plebiscites, elections, and the votes of duly-elected representatives in a legislative assembly such as Congress) to officially represent the public will.

    She wanted a referendum on that but that was disallowed.

    • ilda says:

      Hello Justice

      I don’t think your information is accurate because it was Richard Gordon who lobbied for the conversion of the bases to a business hub:

      To address the problems beforehand, Gordon led the citizens of Olongapo to mobilize and lobby for the inclusion of a free port concept into the national legislation for the conversion of the U.S. bases. The effort was successful, with the inclusion of the establishment of the Subic Bay Freeport Zone (also known as the Subic Special Economic Zone) in Section 12 of Republic Act No. 7227, otherwise known as the Bases Conversion and Development Act, which was approved in March 13, 1992. Section 13 of the same legislation also provided for the establishment of the Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority (SBMA)

      Cory Aquino was an ineffective president not just with the issue on the US military bases but overall.

      Whether or not my arguments would have been recognized by the Senators was not the point. The point was, I would not organize a rally like Cory.

      Don’t concentrate on the trivial stuff. I mentioned my uncles and teachers just to cite an example of what the buzz word then was. I hope you can accept that since the Senators voted against the retention of the bases, it meant that the popular sentiment was to boot them out. Try not to insist that it wasn’t. Just because Tita Cory led a rally does not mean everyone wanted what she wanted. History is already a good indication that majority of Filipinos didn’t want the presence of the US military.

  27. justice league says:

    Artemio,

    Do you even realize the predicament you are in?

    That as President Artemio, you are going to have to sway/convince/persuade a Senate that wants to serve the people’s best interest in the long run and the common good over the long term.

    And as an advocate for the Senate, you are going to have to reject any concessions from a Pres. Artemio that is going to be deemed as less than serving the people’s best interest in the long run and the common good over the long term.

    One thing for sure is that, first, I would not have emboldened the US or Richard Armitage to take a hard stance by staging rallies against the Senate while negotiations are still in progress or still could be made.

    You make it read as if the treaty wasn’t finished already. The Senate was either to concur or reject. Several Senators have already voiced their sentiments so the executive did what it felt they had to do.

    The U.S. administration have already said that they would not re-negotiate the treaty.

    I also would have limited their presence to conventional weapons by asking the US to either leave their nukes outside Philippine territorial waters, given the US can simply carry them in, and launch them from, nuclear submarines (which can run over lengthy periods of time without refueling. These subs carry Polaris ICBMs and launch them from underwater) or in aircraft carriers and other types of ships that could carry nukes; or, as a last resort, simply sign a pact of non-disclosure or confidentiality keeping nuke presence hidden from our ASEAN neighbors (who may be our potential future invaders anyway).

    Your linked article already gives a glimpse that it was tried. “There will, however, always be Filipino officials who will act as lobbyists for the United States. In this case, there were senators and officials in the Aquino government who initiated back-channeling talks with the US. In doing so, they were ready to violate the 1986 Constitution, particularly its prohibition against nuclear weapons, and even proposed strategies that would undermine this.

    (Though the words might be colored by one opposed to the treaty.)

    So your kind of strategy has been tried and you would have fared no better than what Pres. Aquino had.

    These are just off-the-cuff answers

    Quite obvious.

    Did what on purpose? Trying to present both sides fairly?—Of course.

    You painted the Executive as merely ineffective while claiming that Senate wants to serve the people’s best interest in the long run and the common good over the long term. So how fair is that?

    What you interpret as popular support for the retention of the US bases does not tell us much about what people would have opted for were they not voting under the impression that their ouster would result in either economic loss or loss of military support or a weakening of our national security. It’s practically like being forced to choose under duress.

    At least I have something to base my interpretation on while you have shown nothing.

    Why you seem led into thinking that blame should be placed on just one factor is beyond me, but this does not excuse Cory for being [also] ineffective.

    But you haven’t proven that you could do better than “Cory”.

    And as I stated above; you will be the President and the Senate at the same time in presenting your arguments.

    Unless you can beat yourself, you really should have just stayed “upped and left”.

    Ilda,

    I don’t think your information is accurate because it was Richard Gordon who lobbied for the conversion of the bases to a business hub:

    It’s possible they both shared that sentiment and plan. They did see eye to eye on retention of the bases.

    You can’t even accept that since the Senators voted against the retention of the bases, it meant that the popular sentiment was to boot them out. Why are you even insisting that it’s not

    The surveys belie that.

    If you don’t care much for the surveys; then why are you bothering making your own interpretation of the Presidential ones like when you said “63% Ayaw kay Noy – Correct!”

    The point was, I would not organize a rally like Cory.

    The proper statement would be you “would not organize a rally like Cory or even “Gordon”. Everyone already knows that you think “Organizing rallies is just a sign of desperation like a mob mentality”.

    History is already a good indication that majority of Filipinos didn’t want the presence of the US military. How can you argue with that?

    Lady, you’re the one who should get out more often. The U.S. Military are here in the Philippines! History isn’t on your side. Haven’t you heard of “Balikatan”?

    • ilda says:

      Huh?!? So, you’re saying that there was a survey that said majority wanted the retention of the US military bases? Why then did Cory feel the need for a rally to demonstrate popular sentiment? That’s just weird.

      Mr Justice, we are not talking about “Balikatan”. Please do no try to insert that into the conversation. We are talking about the popular sentiment in 1991 not 2010.

      And try not to associate Gordon so much with people power because Cory’s number of attendance in rallies simply outweighs anyone else’s. And I already told you that I don’t have to agree with everything Gordon did or does in order to believe in him. I don’t even agree with his Kindle idea but that doesn’t mean he is going to be an ineffective leader. I just simply look at the results.

  28. justice league says:

    Ilda,

    Huh?!? So, you’re saying that there was a survey that said majority wanted the retention of the US military bases?

    Yes!

    Surveys done by SWS up to Dec. 1991 showed that majority of the Filipinos favored retention of the U.S. bases.

    (Some surveys mouthed off by the Americans had pro-retention at a high of 80+% but those could be questionable so I’m sticking with SWS)

    Had a referendum been conducted as late as Dec. 1991 (since the Senate vote occurred in September 1991), pro-retention would have won.

    Why then did Cory feel the need for a rally to demonstrate popular sentiment?

    Because Senate rejection of the treaty was NOT the popular sentiment. Talks between the Executive department and the Senate have already been conducted and the Senate was still going to reject the treaty which was not the popular sentiment of the Filipinos.

    we are not talking about “Balikatan”. Please do no try to insert that into the conversation. We are talking about the popular sentiment in 1991 not 2010.

    It’s more like since 1999 with the VFA but very well. The popular sentiment in 1991 was still pro-retention.

    That’s just weird.

    Something you could have told the Senate of 1991.

    And try not to associate Gordon so much with people power because Cory’s number of attendance in rallies simply outweighs anyone else’s.

    And still you won’t organize a rally like “Gordon” since everyone already knows that you think “Organizing rallies is just a sign of desperation like a mob mentality”.

    I just simply look at the results.

    So like I told you before; go for Perlas!

    • BongV says:

      I just simply look at the results.

      So like I told you before; go for Perlas!

      The difference between a great consultant and a proven public executive is that while the consultant has brilliant ideas that are adopted by other executives, the proven public executive has brilliant ideas that he himself was able to implement.

       In the field of investments, this is akin to stock equity investments versus <i>actual</i>investments on the ground – in this case the proven consultant/NGO executive versus the proven public executive. Given this is a race for a national public executive position, Gordon is more seasoned than Perlas in the public executive arena – as am sure Perlas can whip Gordon in the NGO executive arena – as Senator, Gordon is in a better position than Perlas to deal with his former colleagues in the Senate. At the local level, having been a former local chief executive himself, Gordon more than knows the ropes of the local government.

       And personally, my deal breaker is the removal of the protectionist clause – Art 12, Sec 10 and Sec 11 – an issue Perlas is silent about, as I wrote a previous blog.

      So, yes, I might say Perlas is brilliant – BUT, Gordon outscores Perlas (in my book) due to Gordon’s more wholistic public service record and proven political will. Moreover, Gordon isn’t a dull blade either and has quite an extensive resume.

      Thus, GO GORDON.

    • ilda says:

      Mr Justice,

      Whatever the reason, survey or no survey, it still doesn’t justify the actions of a President of the Republic calling for a rally!

      The Senators were voted by the Filipino people. I guess it was tough luck that the Senators ended up not listening to their views.

      Let me repeat what I said:

      And try not to associate Gordon so much with people power because Cory’s number of attendance in rallies simply outweighs anyone else’s. And I already told you that I don’t have to agree with everything Gordon did or does in order to believe in him. I don’t even agree with his Kindle idea but that doesn’t mean he is going to be an ineffective leader. I just simply look at the results.

      Since you like former president Cory as a leader so much and take pains to defend her tactics in the past, I have good news for you: Noynoy will be the same kind of leader if he wins the election. This should make you happy.

  29. justice league says:

    Ilda,

    Whatever the reason, survey or no survey, it still doesn’t justify the actions of a President of the Republic calling for a rally!

    I sensed a reddish glow on your cheeks on that one. We probably should do this more often.

    Anyway, what Pres. Aquino did it for is way better than the reasons Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi is doing his.

    Berlusconi was tapped by the justice system which revealed damning information against him.

    He rallied supporters in the streets of Italy denouncing the opposition, the prosecution and even the magistrates.

    The opposition even had to wail how the world has turned upside down as it is now the administration government that is taking to the streets to rally against them!

    I guess it was tough luck that the Senators ended up not listening to their views.

    Well now at least you know the popular sentiment then.

    Since you like former president Cory as a leader so much and take pains to defend her tactics in the past,

    Well, let me repeat what I’ve already said also:

    But definitely; I don’t need to be a “Cory” fanatic to defend her against your blame on the Senate rejection of the American Bases treaty.

    BongV,

    And personally, my deal breaker is the removal of the protectionist clause – Art 12, Sec 10 and Sec 11 – an issue Perlas is silent about, as I wrote a previous blog.

    Unfortunately, like I told you, they are going to lump the good with the bad and it will be submitted for acceptance or rejection in toto.

  30. ilda says:

    @ Justice

    Berlusconi was tapped by the justice system which revealed damning information against him.

    He rallied supporters in the streets of Italy denouncing the opposition, the prosecution and even the magistrates.

    The opposition even had to wail how the world has turned upside down as it is now the administration government that is taking to the streets to rally against them!

    Aha!!! You finally realise how silly it is for a head of state to be organising rallies. I knew you would eventually see the light :)

    It didn’t make any sense at all for her to have organised a rally when as you said, it was a popular sentiment anyway.

    Touche’

  31. justice league says:

    Ilda,

    Aha!!! You finally realise how silly it is for a head of state to be organising rallies.

    Huh. And where the heck did you get that idea?

    Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and later Prime Minister Jean Chretian both held rallies to keep Canada intact when Quebec tried to secede through a referendum twice.

    Should Sen. Gordon become President and follows through in having the Charter amended; you think he’s going to campaign for it by speaking only through the government T.V. channel?

    I knew you would eventually see the light

    But I’m the one already in the lit area.

    It didn’t make any sense at all for her to have organised a rally when as you said, it was a popular sentiment anyway.

    Well, then Olongapo mayor Gordon didn’t need to lead nationwide rallies for the base retention also since it was the popular sentiment anyway.

    Touche’

    http://www.yourdictionary.com/touch-e

    Fencing touched: said in acknowledging that one’s opponent has scored a point by a touch

    used to acknowledge a successful point in debating or a witty retort

    Since you’re the one using the word; then you are acknowledging my statements, for which I thank you!

    • ilda says:

      Touche’

      Mr Justice League, if you haven’t noticed by now, I am here to inform you, that I have been acknowledging some of the info you presented to be valid but it is you who are too proud to admit that your point has been lost since two weeks ago. Why do you even have to bring up Gordon, Berlusconi and those Canadian ministers when we are talking about Cory? Cory was an ineffective president. Full stop already.

      I have already written three articles after this one and you seem to be stuck with this issue. You are like a dog with a bone.

      Let’s move on, shall we?

  32. Pingback: In the News: Is Conrado de Quiros inciting rebellion? | Anti-Pinoy :)

  33. glenn says:

    Im not a Noynoy nor Mar fan, but i wanted them to win. So that the people will again realized how stupid they were to believe two jerks who have done nothing in their political career just to give them a clean image. Try feeding your children with two bars of Mr. Clean.

    Just imagine this, Noynoy will give the Hacienda Luisita lands back to the farmers if he get elected President.
    If he is really sincere, he doesn’t have to be president to do that!! what makes it more funny is that the CARP law will expire even before he could take his oath (if he wins).

    Im not a Crony oops Cory fan too, her battle cries is her campaign is the price of galunggong. And the price of that poor mans fish sky rocketed from P40/kilo to P80/kilo during her term.

    Noynoy negative attitude? why wonder? its already explained in the psychiatric report , which they tried to ignore. Anyway who knows if he got elected, he might move office from Malacanang to Mandaluyong.

    • ilda says:

      Hi Glen

      Thanks for your comment.

      I often think to myself that the only way we will get validation about the stuff we’ve written is when Noynoy is finally in the presidential palace, twiddling his thumbs…but, I am not that selfish as to even wish him to win just so I can hear people say, “You guys were right all along”. I’d rather that people realise the error of their decision before the election. Unfortunately, it might take a miracle for that to happen :(

    • usi says:

      “Im not a Noynoy nor Mar fan, but i wanted them to win.”
      - When you’re young, you have the luxury to think that way.

      “the psychiatric report , which they tried to ignore.”
      - It was fake. Some say it’s one of LP’s dirty tricks to buy Noynoy more airtime.

      Anyway, please stop wishing they’d win and start campaigning against them and for the rightful candidates. Thank you! :)

  34. Novell says:

    This candidate needs to improve his diplomatic skills.

  35. justice league says:

    Ilda,

    Mr Justice League, if you haven’t noticed by now, I am here to inform you, that I have been acknowledging some of the info you presented

    Yes, I have noticed. That’s why I thanked you.

    but it is you who are too proud to admit that your point has been lost since two weeks ago. Why do you even have to bring up Gordon, Berlusconi and those Canadian ministers when we are talking about Cory?

    It’s not my point that’s been lost.

    My point is that there are valid reasons when leaders or heads of States have to organize rallies. You obviously don’t see it that way specially when you said “You finally realise how silly it is for a head of state to be organising rallies.”

    Berlusconi’s reasons are so self-serving that no one needs to argue about what he did.

    But those Canadian Prime Ministers had valid reasons to organize theirs the same way that President Aquino had hers. The same way that Sen. Gordon will have his if he tries to fulfill his plans to revise the Constitution.

    Cory was an ineffective president.

    Pres. Ilda, Pres. Artemio, and even Pres. B0 couldn’t prove that they could do better than she did in this regard.

    I have already written three articles after this one …

    Well don’t expect me to write even one article here. This is after all antipinoy.com.

    Let’s move on, shall we?

    Lady, that’s what I wanted to do way back on April 6, 2010 1:48 pm , remember?

    Very well.

    • BongV says:

      Pres. Ilda, Pres. Artemio, and even Pres. B0 couldn’t prove that they could do better than she did in this regard.

      That’s moot and academic – for all you know – Pres. Ilda, Pres. Artemio, and even Pres. B0 have the AP crew as cabinet secretaries :lol:

    • ilda says:

      @Justice

      Cory was an ineffective president. She was more addicted to people power rallies compared to the others you mentioned :)

      PS
      Just in case you don’t understand what AntiPinoy is about, AntiPinoy blog writers write about Filipinos who behave like they are anti-Pinoy. The question is: Are you one of the anti-Pinoys? :)

  36. MJ says:

    noynoy is nothing but a spoiled brat who gets whatever he wants and goes crying to his sisters boo hoo waaah! he’s a slacker and doesn’t deserve to be the next leader of this nation. Manny Villar is so right in saying : “….There is no six-month probationary period for the job! It is six years!There is no room for on-the-job training. Our country has too many complex problems and too many competing interests and we will need a strong leader with a proven track record to even have a chance!”.. Manny Villar is the man! Villar for president!

  37. MJ says:

    folks, i just dug in the Net. the speech of Mr. Manny Villar with the Makati Business Club. I am so impressed and believe in his sincerity that i can hardly wait to post it.. and the other one is an article about the Aquino’s Kamag-anak Inc. :D . Hope you enjoy reading :)

    http://philippineselection.blogspot.com/2010/02/strong-leader-strong-nation-speech-of.html#comment-45129949

    http://philippineselection.blogspot.com/2010/02/strong-leader-strong-nation-speech-of.html#comment-45129949

    • usi says:

      MJ, have you seen Winnie Monsod’s videos on the C-5 controversy? Have you read Esposo’s article on the real reason Manny’s brother died? Please…wake up!

      • MJ says:

        i’ve seen it. nasagot na yan. luma na yan. she needs to fire back but she hasn’t :D and regarding ’bout esposo’s article, kulang-kulang din… namaaaan.

  38. MJ says:

    here it goes….

    A Strong Leader A Strong Nation – Speech of Senator Manuel “Manny” Villar

    Distinguished friends, fellow businessmen, members of the diplomatic corps, colleagues, ladies and gentlemen. Good afternoon to you all. Magandang hapon po sa inyong lahat.

    First of all, I would like to thank the Makati Business Club, headed by Chairman Ramon del Rosario Jr., for inviting me to speak before you today. As I look around the room, I think that in all the various forums I have attended, this one probably has the highest concentration of wealth, power, intelligence, and years of business experience, than all the others. Many of you are leaders in your field, captains of industry, ex-cabinet members — people who, one way or another, have had a strong influence in the path our country has taken over the years. It is a privilege to be your guest here today.

    However, I must admit that when I first received this invitation, some of my advisers asked me “why bother”? I was informed of the results of your in-house surveys, and it showed that I am not exactly your favorite candidate – although one must make mention that the survey I saw represented only 13% of your membership. Someone even warned me that it would be like Barack Obama addressing the Ku Klux Klan.

    Kidding aside, I had no doubt in my mind that I should accept your kind invitation and speak to you today. I believe that, as a presidential candidate, it is my duty, my obligation, to share with you some of my thoughts and ideas, some of my hopes and plans for the country should I be elected, and also to give some of you who have never met me, a glimpse of who I am and what I stand for.

    Given my background, my humble beginnings, which most of you are aware of by now, I think it would be useful not to dwell on what makes us so different, but to point out what we have in common. Often, mistrust stems from a perception that “he’s not one of us.” To this day, wars are being fought in the name of religion, or over differences in a person’s origin. I am not saying that that is the main reason why perhaps many of you do not support me, but I will say that it is probably easier to throw one’s support behind someone familiar, someone they think they know.
    So I would like to point out a few things. Please remember that, like most of you here, I understand very well the challenges – the ups and downs – of setting up and running a business in this country. How often do we hear people say, when they see a successful venture – say, a restaurant or a BPO – “Kayang kaya ko yan gawin.”? How many of them have actually done it?

    Like most of you here, I have managed people – subordinate and senior – from all walks of life – and I recognize that it takes a lot of patience, skill, and many years of experience to be an effective manager.

    Like most of you here, I have spoken to foreigners many times – to international investors and to senior government officials – and I know what they are looking for when they are considering their investment options.

    Like most of you here, I know – we all know – that our country needs to weed out a culture of corruption, to build infrastructure, to raise education standards, to create jobs and an environment conducive to investment –and, of course, to reduce and perhaps one day eliminate poverty.

    And, most importantly, like most of you here, I know the difference between ‘knowing” what has to be done, and actually being “able” to do it.

    PLANS

    So here are some of my plans. Some of the things I will be able to do.

    Just as I have promised to the people, we will make poverty alleviation our top priority. However, this is something that everyone, including the poor themselves, must strive for and work towards. What I can do is give more access and opportunities to those who don’t have it because they are poor. I will work hard to raise education standards, build more schools, and reward deserving teachers. I intend to accomplish this by spending more for education. I will also try to create a more competitive environment among schools, among teachers, so that those that perform well are rewarded, and those that don’t are held accountable.

    I will build safety nets for the less fortunate – more access to healthcare for example. For our OFWs, there must be a system to address their needs when they encounter trouble overseas and to bring them back if need be.

    I cannot promise no new taxes as the next administration will inherit empty coffers. The fiscal deficit this year is projected to balloon to over 300 billion pesos or about 3.5% of GDP. It would be irresponsible of me to limit my options knowing the magnitude of the problem. Of course, we will push to raise revenues and spend wisely. But as we have seen, raising revenues is not a simple matter. We already have one of the highest tax rates in the region. People will have to pay their taxes. I am beholden to no one and I will be in a strong position to reduce tax evasion and smuggling.

    From Day One, I will make clear that there will be zero tolerance of graft and corruption. Sadly, there is no country in the world that has been able to eliminate it completely. I will work hard to reduce it significantly.

    If elected, I will set the tone during the first 100 days, the first year of my administration. Large contracts can be bidded out and televised for all to see. This would send a message that we mean business. The government has to set the example for all to follow.

    I believe that job creation is critical to solving the poverty problem. In the long run I would like to see a Philippines where no Filipino has to venture overseas just to find work. But given the state of our economy, that is not realistic today. What I will do is create an investment climate where our country will be back on the radar screen of foreign investors. Simply “leveling the playing field” is not good enough. What good is a level playing field here, if the field in other countries is much more attractive? All investors want clear rules, simple tax laws, availability and competence of labor, and decent infrastructure.

    I will institute vast and immediate improvements on infrastructure. One of the first things I will do is to start work on connecting NLEX to SLEX. Since funding is limited, maybe we can look at BOT structures.

    I will try to strike a delicate balance between business and safeguarding the environment. My record here speaks for itself – I have planted over one million trees.

    I will try to reawaken in Filipinos the spirit of entrepreneurship. One problem I see here is access to financing for start-ups and small businesses – we have to encourage the financial community to lend to SMEs.

    To get to where we want to go, we will need to address all these problems. They are all inter-related. We will need a concerted effort; a major push forward. For example, right now, the BPO industry accounts for about 5% of GDP and is growing at 20% per annum. It will soon become the second engine of growth together with remittances from overseas Filipinos.

    We can greatly help the industry by ensuring that the supply of educated labor continues, and by improving our infrastructure so that investors keep coming because they find it easy to do business here. That, in turn, will create jobs which means higher employment and more government revenues.

    We need to get out of this vicious cycle, and create a virtuous one.

    There are so many problems to address. I cannot go over every one of them here. My purpose here is to give you some idea of my plans and my approach. I cannot promise you that all the problems will be solved, because the future of this country does not lie in the hands of one person. We will all need to do our part.

    I can promise you that I will provide strong and honest leadership for our country. By doing so, I hope that the rest will follow towards building a stronger nation.

    So these are some of my thoughts and plans, and I believe I can do it if given the chance.

    I have been Speaker of the House and Senate President, gaining the highest satisfaction ratings while leading both Houses of Congress, and I understand far more than many the complexities that effective governance requires. If memory serves me right, trust ratings for the Senate hit a high of 70 percent during my leadership. I believe “government” and “politics” need not be dirty words.

    Because of the nature of government, a leader must be able to immediately command respect; otherwise the bureaucracy and clashing interests will overwhelm a neophyte. A true leader must be decisive – in spite of the risks, remember that I did not hesitate to impeach a sitting president.

    CHOOSING A CEO

    Now, please allow me to pose a question to you. When you are considering a candidate for a senior position in your respective companies, or when your Board is conducting a search for a CEO, what qualities do you deem important in a candidate? How do you go about the selection process?

    Think about it. A CEO, a true leader, must look after the interests of ALL his company’s stakeholders – employees, shareholders, creditors, suppliers, etc… Tough decisions will have to be made in normal times, let alone in times of crisis. Now multiply the existing problems faced by your company a hundred times. That is what our new Chief Executive will face this year.

    There is no six-month probationary period for the job! It is six years! There is no room for on-the-job training. Our country has too many complex problems and too many competing interests and we will need a strong leader with a proven track record to even have a chance!

    I built my name – in business and in politics – through hard work and perseverance. Yes. Sipag at Tiyaga. I have never been anybody’s crony. Some of my critics may have forgotten that. I think we should instill in our country – in our children – the value of hard work. We should start by setting examples – by training them – by letting them know that they have to earn their place. They cannot just inherit the top spot. They cannot just wait to lead the businesses we have built once we’re gone, without proper training and experience. You cannot just tell them – “Anak, tanungin mo na lang ang Tito o Tita mo kung paano magpatakbo niyan pag nagka-problema.” You will find so many examples – case studies – where businesses failed after simply being handed over by families to the next generation.

    I know much of what I say today may fall on deaf ears. But I am still hopeful that even a few will open their minds and see the merits of what I am saying. I remember some 15 years back, when then President Ramos made it clear that he was going to dismantle monopolies – telecommunications was one – and create a more competitive environment – the so-called “level playing field” that everyone today likes to talk about. I remember that there was fear from the big businessmen.

    With all due respect, I will quote something said by Ayala Corp Chairman Jaime Zobel de Ayala during that period. He echoed the growing and widespread concern in the business community, and said: “There is a determined effort, on the part of some government officials in sensitive places, to look upon business, particularly large and established ones, as detrimental to the national interests.”

    Now how many people in this room have a Globe cell phone? Today, Globe Telecom, which is part of the Ayala Group, is one of the major players in a very competitive and dynamic telecommunications industry. And it took a strong leader, someone considered an outsider – President Ramos – to dismantle the decades-old PLDT monopoly, which had remained untouched during the term of the previous administration.

    HUMBLE BEGINNINGS

    I would like to say just a few more things before I conclude my speech. Let me tell you that I am proud of my humble beginnings. Perhaps I would not be where I am today had it not been for all those difficult but important lessons I learned early in my life. What I can say, that perhaps many of you cannot, is that I know what it feels like to be poor. I know what the poor are going through right now. I grew up in Tondo. Galing akong Moriones. Maybe some of you in this room have never even set foot in Tondo. Yes, all candidates are pro-poor… remember nobody in the history of this country ever got elected on a pro-rich platform.

    But for me pro-poor doesn’t mean being anti-rich.

    If I do become President, yes I will focus on the poor because I understand their plight, but I also understand that we will need the businesses to grow and thrive so that the economy can move forward and our people can find employment. I’m sure the companies associated with the Makati Business Club employ thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of people. Whether you support my candidacy or not, if I am elected, I hope to be able to work with you for the good of our country.

    RESPECTABLE CAMPAIGN
    I would also like to state that I am trying to conduct a respectable campaign. Yes I have spent money – much of it my own – because as a person of humble origins, I may not be as well known to many of our people. But I have I tried to avoid negativity. I have so far avoided attacking my fellow candidates. My ads simply try to communicate a little bit of who I am, where I came from, and what I stand for. For you marketing managers out there, who might be even a little impressed with some of my ads, I would hope that you might see this as some small clue – some testament to my abilities as a business leader. We will all need someone to provide leadership and represent our country on the world stage.

    We keep asking why tourists don’t come here when our beaches, our many tourist sites, are among the best in the world? Well, marketing – communicating – your message effectively is an important part of the equation. I’m sure many of you have rejected so-called qualified candidates for a certain job … people with MBAs or PhDs, because they could not communicate effectively.

    We will need to compete with the up-and-coming countries of Asia. I am tired of hearing the same old refrain about how we used to be only second to Japan. That is not communicating. Let us stop lamenting the past and move on! Let us move forward!

    Ladies and gentlemen, whether you are green… or orange… or yellow… or purple… or whatever…, at the end of the day, we are all Filipinos. And after we all exercise our right to vote…. and we have elected a new leader for the Philippines, we must all lick our wounds and go back to addressing the complex problems facing our beloved country. And we must do everything we can to help whoever that new leader might be.

    If elected, I promise you that I will do my part. I hope you will do yours.

    Thank you and good afternoon.

  39. MJ says:

    repost:

    Noynoy committed graft in forming security firm

    The Nacionalista Party (NP) camp of presidential aspirant Sen. Manuel Villar Jr. went on an offensive yesterday accusing Liberal Party (LP) standard bearer Sen. Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III of corruption in setting up a security agency when his mother, former President Corazon Aquino, was in power more than two decades ago.

    NP spokesman and senatorial bet Gilbert Remulla made the charges, accusing Aquino of supposedly violating the anti-graft law in disclosing the latter’s Best Security Agency (BSA) set up sometime in 1986 shortly after his mother, was installed into the presidency.

    Allegedly, BSA provided services to government firms, Remulla said.

    “Sen. Aquino certainly violated the Anti-Graft and Corrupt Practices Act of 1965. What is infuriating is that he shows no remorse or guilt over the whole thing. It’s as if it’s just an ordinary thing doing business with the government when his mother was the then sitting president. This is what’s most alarming,” Remulla said.

    “He should not try to sweep this

    episode in his life under the rug as if it were a small, minor thing. It is not minor. He put up a security agency while his mother was president and bagged contracts with government corporations and agencies. I don’t know how he can say there was nothing wrong with it,” he said.

    Remulla further alleged that Aquino sat on the agency’s board of directors while his uncle, Antolin “Len” Oreta, Jr. acted as BSA chairman and president.

    Oreta is the husband of former Sen. Tessie Aquino-Oreta who now sits as chairperson of the Early Child Care and Development Council and holds the rank of Cabinet member in the Arroyo administration.

    Other directors of BSA were Cipriano Lacson, director-treasurer, George Gaddi, Bienvenido Reyes, Alexander Lopez and Jacob Acuna, known friends and allies of the Aquino family.

    The Aquino presidency from 1986 to 1992 had been rocked by allegations of cronyism after several of Aquino’s relatives were implicated in some questionable deals. The persistent reports and rumors gave rise to the infamous moniker “Kamag-anak, Inc.”

    The anti-graft law, or Republic Act 3019, states it is “unlawful for any person having family or close personal relation with any public official to capitalize or exploit or take advantage of such family or close personal relation by directly or indirectly requesting or receiving any present, gift or material or pecuniary advantage from any other person having some business, transaction, application, request or contract with the government, in which such public official has to intervene.”

    “He even used the Arlegui House, which was the official residence of the President then, as the address on the SEC papers. Imagine, the president’s son putting up a private company and using the official address of the President of the Republic for the firm’s corporate registration papers,” Remulla said.

    At the same time, Remulla warned against the possible resurrection of “Kamag-Anak, Inc.” should LP standard bearer Noynoy Aquino win in the May polls.

    According to Remulla, among Noynoy’s relatives who had worked or are still working for the Arroyo administration are Paul Aquino, former Tarlac governor Margarita Cojuangco, Lupita Aquino-Kashiwahara and former senator Tessie Aquino-Oreta.

    Paul Aquino is the president and chief executive officer of the Energy Development Corporation. Margarita Cojuangco is president of the Philippine Public Safety College. Lupita Aquino-Kashiwahara is an image consultant of President Arroyo. Former Environment Secretary Eleazar Quinto is married to Kashiwahara’s daughter.

    “Noynoy’s relatives are working for GMA and benefiting from this corrupt administration which he claims he will sweep away. These same relatives who are well-entrenched in the GMA administration are now backing Noynoy. So who’s Gloria’s secret candidate? Even Cabinet members of GMA are openly supporting Noynoy when they are supposed to be working for Gibo. Now look who’s talking,” Remulla said.

    “Noynoy’s candidacy is backed by the power and influence of the Cojuangco-Aquino family. We should not forget that behind the Aquino presidency from 1986 to 1992 was the so-called “Kamag-Anak, Inc.”, who cornered huge government contracts behind her back,” Remulla added.

    On the contentious Hacienda Luisita issue, Remulla said: “While Noynoy says now that he wants to divest himself of ownership of Hacienda Luisita, his cousin told the New York Times in no uncertain terms that the family will never give up the huge property. Who’s telling the truth? Are we going to have the “Kamag-Anak, Inc.” rule the country again if Noynoy wins in May?”

    Remulla also blasted leaders of the Liberal Party who he said were responsible for shielding the Arroyo administration from serious charges of electoral fraud.

    “Who can forget what former senator Franklin Drilon said when he was still Senate President? He said that if imperial Manila did not want GMA, then she is very much welcome in his home province of Iloilo. This is the same Drilon who is now part of the LP senatorial slate, apart from being LP president,” Remulla said.

    “Sen. Francis Pangilinan, another leader of the Liberal Party, defended Arroyo to the hilt when the opposition then led by standard bearer Fernando Poe Jr. raised charges of massive electoral fraud in the 2004 elections. He was part of the grand conspiracy to rob FPJ of a legitimate mandate. He merely ‘noted’ numerous allegations of cheating against FPJ in many parts of the country, but did nothing to investigate these allegations. He was a key player in the cover-up of dagdag-bawas in 2004 in its most virulent form,” Remulla pointed out.

    “Our political rivals accuse Sen. Villar of being the ‘secret candidate’ of Malacañang. This is a sure sign that they are running out of valid issues to raise against him. The Nacionalista Party prefers to conduct a high-level campaign based on a sober and rational discussion of issues,” Remulla said.

    “If the other political parties want to conduct a campaign based on character assassination and mudslinging, then that’s their own look-out. We believe the Filipino electorate is intelligent and discerning enough to sift fact from fiction,” the former Cavite congressman said.

    Saying the duty of the competition is toppling whoever is at the top, Lakas – Kampi – CMD regional chairman, Quezon Rep. Danilo Suarez took the initiative in behalf of the administration to step up its campaign against Aquinoby distributing copies of a documentary film dealing on the failed promise of redistributing Hacienda Luisita to its tenant-farmers and implicating the LP standard bearer to the infamous Luisita Massacre in 2004 to administration candidates in the province of Laguna.

    In an interview, Suarez said the documentary film, Walang Bahid o Walang Budhi, was based on the an original film production made by the late Tarlac Rep. Jose “Apeng” Yap, “Ani ng Dugo,” which was later used by a party-list group in its version of the film, “Ani ng Welga.”

    The film, though coming short of directly implicating Aquino to the Luisita Massacre where seven peasants were killed in a violent dispersal of a farmers’ rally in November 16, 2004, captures the hacienda farm workers’ laments as they accused the Cojuangco – Aquinos of reneging on the conditions provided for in their loan agreement with the Government Service Insurance System (GSIS) in 1957 that the suga estate would have to be distributed to its tenant-farmers after 10 years.

    The film also shows footages of the Mendiola Massacre where 13 peasants were killed at the very doorsteps of Malacañang during the tenure of Noynoy’s mother, the late President Cory Cojuangco – Aquino.

  40. SAMMY DARZA says:

    I enjoyed reading your opost regarding Noynoy’s negative attitude. May I ask your permission to publish your post in our local dailies here in Cebu?

    Thank you.

    SAMMY

  41. TULONG says:

    Nakaka awa na ang bansa natin. Pakiusap NOYNOY, mali ang tingin sa iyo ng mga tao, hindi nila alam na wala kang kayang gawin. At yung mga pangako mo, very common na yan mg ayan. at papaano mo gagawin yung mga yan? wala ka naman sinabi. Saan ka hihingi ng tulong? sa mga advisers mo na corrupt? NAKAKAAWA NA ANG BANSA NATIN!

  42. justice league says:

    BongV,

    for all you know – Pres. Ilda, Pres. Artemio, and even Pres. B0 have the AP crew as cabinet secretaries

    What I know is that I previously asked a question of AP authors.

    http://antipinoy.com/overseas-filipinos-are-greedy-cowards-not/comment-page-1/#comment-7404

    Since you brought up the “AP crew”; then it would only be fitting that I ask the same question about them.

    I have proof that B0 insults Filipinos and that he operates on a “Filipino is damned if he does this and still damned if the Filipino does the opposite.”

    How many times has this Antipinoy crew here have stood against him when he does that?

    Ilda,

    Just in case you don’t understand what AntiPinoy is about,

    I say I know enough.

    AntiPinoy blog writers write about Filipinos who behave like they are anti-Pinoy. The question is: Are you one of the anti-Pinoys?

    That is something you should answer about yourself first.

    Like I said above; I have proof that B0 insults Filipinos and that he operates on a “Filipino is damned if he does this and still damned if the Filipino does the opposite.”

    (Heck, if you want that proof, I can paste an entire post from FV to this thread.)

    So how many times have you stood against him when does that?

    So how many times have AntiPinoy blog writers (including you) written about how B0 behaves as an anti-Pinoy?

    If you can’t answer that; then maybe you should have just moved on already like you claimed to want to.

  43. StopNoynoyStop says:

    Noynoy’s black propaganda should be stopped. Why cant he just put all his effort on improving his platform, sharing his accomplishments, if there are any, and stop badmouthing other candidates. Noynoy speaks as if he is the son of God being born of 2 hero parents.

    • Jay says:

      He can’t because his head is up so far in his ass that he wants this presidency for the sake of Legacy. That since he’s an Aquino, he’s entitle to to the position much like his mother was. Its very hard to improve his platform considering he’s got nothing to show for it, besides his I haven’t done anything, making me the most neutral of all the candidates in any given position.

      I think AP had the best solution for him: Do the country a favor and drop out of the race. He doesn’t bring much promise as a president, especially if you’ve see his debates compared to the other candidates.

      And of course Noynoy would use the chosen one excuse. When you don’t have much going for politics, you use every bit of your legacy you have.

      • BenK says:

        What makes you say Cory was ‘entitled’ to the position in the first place? She was a tool as much as her kid is.

    • glenn says:

      What !!! Hero parents??? You actually believe Cory and Ninoy are heroes?? If Cory and Ninoy are heroes, then every Filipino that toil for a decent living can be also be tagged as heroes!! His parents are no different from a pagan god created by Aaron to appease the lost Israelites in the Old Testament. They created Ninoy as a hero because the people needed a tangible leader or cause to inspire uprising against the Marcoses. They are product of necessities but not due to actual accomplishments. If Ninoy belongs to a peasant family in the provinces, his death will only be part of statistics, just like the thousand of Filipinos that died fighting for democracy but names unheard because their families are not hacienda owners.

      Noynoy should not feel comfortable because the surveys says he is leading, the surveys are not the one that will make him president, in fact the survey will work against him during election time, because cheating are always done to candidates with the most probable highest votes, the reason, shaving votes from a candidate with high votes is always hard to notice. If he survive the election, then his 6 years will be plague with yearly threat of impeachment, remember that Arroyo funded the congressmen but not the local executive candidates. In our current form of government a presidency can be held hostage by a opposition controlled congress and senate.

  44. rmb says:

    i still can recall years ago the words Noynoy said to Imelda,” nasisiraan na ng bait ang babae na iyan “in a primetime tv news reacting to heated trade of barbs between Imelda and Cory,noynoy is walang modo

  45. jumatra says:

    si noynoy abnoy parang bata pa kumilos. Mental age nito parang mala josh lang. Kaya siguro sabi ni josh wag muna si Noynoy magasawa. Buti pa yung bata alam na hindi pa niya kaya. Kung hindi pa kaya ni noynoy magasawa pagiging presidente pa kaya pa niya? I have to agree… his parents were all aktibistas. si noynoy din aktibista. kaya nga gustong gusto sila ng mga NPA manalo eh. para buong bansa lalong gumulo.

  46. Pingback: Do Filipinos really know how to be positive? | Anti-Pinoy :)

  47. glenn says:

    Probably with the help of Joshua

  48. I much prepared with Manny Villar, the way he think. Now I know that Villar has a one word.

  49. Arararar says:

    So True Very Well Said :
    Just to add

    Noynoy=Cojuangco=Greedy Heartless Very Corrupt San Miguel Corp and Subsidies

    Noynoy=Ninoy /Cory= Martial Law= EDSA = ABS CBN ad MERALCO returned to LOPEZ =high price in electricity IPP taxes and charges irresponsible media Wowowee

    Noynoy= No proven own accomplishment = puppet of the few “elite”=failureMajority Blinded by MediaReal Estate Expansion=San Miguel Corp= Cojuangco & Cronnies

  50. Arararar says:

    So True Very Well Said :
    Just to add

    Noynoy=Cojuangco=Greedy Heartless Very Corrupt San Miguel Corp and Subsidies

    Noynoy=Ninoy /Cory= Martial Law= EDSA = ABS CBN ad MERALCO returned to LOPEZ =high price in electricity IPP taxes and charges irresponsible media Wowowee

    Noynoy= No proven own accomplishment = puppet of the few “elite”=failure

    Majority Blinded by Media

    Real Estate Expansion=San Miguel Corp= Cojuangco & Cronnies

  51. Pingback: Is Chief Justice Renato Corona a victim of Noynoy Aquino's low self-esteem? | Get Real Post

  52. Pingback: PNoy is just being himself when he is Noynoying | Get Real Post

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