Winnie Monsod’s video: Going viral does not necessarily translate to delivering INSIGHT

Who presumes to be an authority on who’s led an “honourable” or less-than-“honourable” life? Apparently esteemed “economics” professor Winnie Monsod thinks she is one such authority. In her recent “gone-viral” video, Monsod admonishes people who after being educated in the University of the Philippines (UP) — country’s premier state university — had opted to seek their fortunes overseas.

“If you are going to help this country, you’ve got to be in the country. If any of you have ambitions of going abroad so that you can earn more, please disabuse yourself, because by doing that, you are essentially betraying the people in the Philippines who trusted you and who invested their money in you,” she told her students, whose tuition at UP is subsidized by the government.

A couple of things:

(1) Why only students of UP?

Shouldn’t she be including the millions of Filipinos who were educated by Filipino taxpayers through the rest of the public education system?

And;

(2) Why only people who go abroad?

Last I heard the number of Filipinos who live in the islands overwhelmingly and utterly dwarfs the number of people who are working and residing abroad. Even without doing much research on the subject, I don’t think too many people would disagree with an unsubstantiable assertion that for every one Filipino earning sweet dollars abroad, there are on the average four to five (or even nine, thanks to Catholic dogma) direct family members and a vast network of extended family and friends related to these waiting at home mouths agape for the next “paycheck” to be distributed thinly amongst them (thus the logo of AntiPinoy.com).

Suffice to say, this simple counter-challenge could be made to those who presume to be the judge of who is doing a lot — or “not enough” for our sad “country:

If you don’t want Filipinos to leave the islands, then let us stop depending on their earnings.

The sort of hollow-headed populist admonitions of people who pompously go where JFK had already gone before rings hollow in a country run aground and rendered a vast economic, physical, intellectual, and spiritual wasteland by its own people.

The simple truth about the backward chronically impoverished people that Filipinos are is encapsulated in something I wrote way back in a piece exploring the notion of self reliance — a concept that is all but alien to the Filipino mind:

We pester the elite of our society with calls for acts of heroism when the burden of extra hard work in reality falls on the shoulders of the poor masses.

Indeed…

We Filipinos have been imbued with the idea that our hopes for prosperity lie squarely on the shoulders of the elite, the “haves”, a handful of leaders and/or a few “extraordinary” individuals. Our society has come to (or, more appropriately never matured beyond) a penchant for giving heroic labels to these “messiahs”, as if the Philippines is constantly waiting for a hero to rescue her from her dysfunction. We expect heroic efforts from the few and continued mediocrity from the majority.

…and, more to highlight the politically incorrect point…

We expect the low product of the majority to be subsidised by the execptional output of the minority.

So read it and weep folks. Populist drivel espoused by people like Monsod is the sort of bullshit we’d like to hear (and add to our collection of moronic “status updates”). But reality has a way of rubbing our fur the wrong way and embedding itself deep in our balat sibuyas. It takes real insight to spot these cling-on bits of reality hiding underneath our glossy fur and a lot of hard work to pick them off our thin hides.

Deal with it.

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About benign0

benign0 is the Web master of GetRealPhilippines.com
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99 Responses to Winnie Monsod’s video: Going viral does not necessarily translate to delivering INSIGHT

  1. benign0 says:

    Sorry folks, I didn’t realise that commenting on this article was disabled for some reason. Anyways, better late than never… 🙂

  2. ilda says:

    I don’t really understand why people still look up to Monsod. She is one of the reasons why P-Noy won the election. She knew that P-Noy does not have what it takes to lead a nation but her fence sitting position helped convinced people that he has “integrity.”  She is an example of the failure of the Philippine so-called “elite.”

    Please read:

    The so-called Philippine “Elite”: failure of leadership

    • racumin says:

      Hi Ilda, honestly, did you watch the video clip?
      For me, it was really inspiring. Im a UP graduate working in a Filipino company here in the Philippines. Dahil dun sa lecture nya, mas na motivate ako magtrabaho kasi pinagsisilbihan ko na ang Pilipinas (paying taxes and promoting Filipino business) na dating nagsilbi sakin (nung nag aaral pa ko)
      Sa pagkakaintindi ko, ang point nung lecture ay (1) do not cheat – Cheating in a small way leads to cheating in big ways(2) serve the country – Give the country something in return dahil pinag aral ka naman nito. Pwedeng pera (tax), knowledge or service.(3) there should be honor in everything that we do – Kaya nga madaming corrupt kasi wala silang honor e.
      Yung core ng lecture sa tingin ko ay parehas din ng gustong iparating ng site na to: “if you want change, start with yourself” Wala akong nakitang masama sa mga sinabi nya. Pare parehas naman nating gustong umasenso ang Pinas diba?
      To answer the question above:
      (1) Why only students of UP?- Dahil UP students ang kausap nya. Her lecture was not intended for OFWs or tambays sa kanto. Hindi din to para sa mga grumaduate sa private schools (Ateneo, La Salle, etc).
      (2) Why only people who go abroad?- Binanggit nya na yung mga students ng Medicine na after nila grumaduate, pumunta na agad sila sa ibang bansa para dun magpayaman.
      By the way, sa tagal tagal kong nagbabasa dito sa antipinoy, ngayon lang ako nagcomment hehe 🙂

      • ilda says:

        Hi racumin
        Yes, I saw the video even before this article was published. I’m glad she has inspired you. She has inspired you enough to make your first comment here at AP 😉 That’s really what life is all about -finding a reason to help us continue living with a little bit more enthusiasm. 

        But I guess having been used to my no holds-barred commenting style, you will forgive me for saying that her speech has a different effect on me. It further confirmed to me that she is totally clueless about why Filipinos are leaving in droves. It is very disappointing because she is an economist and yet she does not realize that some people don’t really have a choice but to go.

        I mean, everyone starts out being patriotic or wanting to stay and be productive here in the Phils. However, there’s just not enough opportunity for everyone to go by. Not everyone has the luxury to do pro-bono work. Apart from that, people who stay have to deal with the anti-intellectual attitude of the majority of the population. I don’t know if you realize it but more often than not, it is just so hard to deal with colleagues who just don’t get what you are trying to say. In short, some people’s hard work and intelligence is either totally ignored or unappreciated.

        I do see her point in asking UP graduates to stay in the country out of gratitude but that’s also where the problem lies. There are people who can’t really survive on gratitude alone. As I said earlier, life is all about -finding a reason to help us continue living with a little bit more enthusiasm. 

        Monsod has really turned me off with her fence-sitting attitude during the election and she has not redeemed herself to me with this speech of hers.

        Cheers!

      • Miriam Quiamco says:

        Good reply to the above comment Iida, you seem a lot wiser than Winnie Monsod who is going to be 70?

      • ilda says:

        Yes. I heard she is 70 years old. As my 12 year old friend once told me: “The amount of years in your life don’t matter: its the life in your years that do.”

      • racumin says:

        “… some people don’t really have a choice but to go”

        “… some people’s hard work and intelligence is either totally ignored or unappreciated”

        – I agree with you

        Iba iba siguro tayo ng interpretation dun sa sinabi nya. Para sakin, yung mga sinabihan nyang nag abroad na agad e yung mga walang ni-return na kahit ano sa Pinas. Pwedeng nag migrate or nagpayaman na dun ng wala man lang tinulong sa Pinas.

    • krainierd says:

      @ racumin
      Siguro naman karamihan sa nag-aabroad ay may pamilya rin naiwan dito…hidni naman sa nagpapayaman, kailangan lang magsurvive…

      maybe this next point will get me shot: why work for people who do not pay taxes, who make so much children to burden those who are working honestly eating up taxes that should have been spent building better infrastructure to support our goal to improve our economy and the lives of the FIlipinos? Maybe I’m selfish but it is reality that people work for their own welfare and their family and not for some unemployed tambay who has many children and blames the government for it…

  3. Mari says:

    Monsod really needs to see our problem as a system-environmental issue not an issue of individual morality or patriotism. She is lucky she came from a elite stock but most of has have to work our asses off to earn our bread, send our children to school and have the chance to have a happy and prosperous life and comfortable retirement. All this are simply not possible for many of the future professionals of this generation if they stay to work in the motherland.  

    • krainierd says:

      The current poverty line is about P10,000 if you have a family. A regular wage earner only gets paid @ about P345-385 pesos meaning for 22 days/month the total wage is less than P9,000 which is taxed. Using these assumptions, both parents must work for a family of about four to be above the poverty line. But then, the lower deciles of our population has families which only: have one wage earner and has more than 2 children.

      Earning money is a difficult task here in the Philippines. Many FIlipinos would rather work outside and earn a decent living and send it back here to their families. People have to survive and to hell with patriotism coz it won’t feed the hungry mouths of their families.

  4. inflame says:

    (1) Why only students of UP?Shouldn’t she be including the millions of Filipinos who were educated by Filipino taxpayers through the rest of the public education system?
    –> Because she was lecturing UP students? She did keep mentioning “the university” several times. this video went viral because a student among the 350 present went ahead and posted.

    (2) Why only people who go abroad?
    –> Again, because she was asking/pleading the UP students to stay the fck in the country and actually work at slightly/greatly lower wages and sacrifice part of their dreams to help uplift their country for their future children?

    Give her a break man, it was a lecture intended for UP students. people by the way, who are actually of a different mindset from most of us. from someone who did not come from UP, but can understand where they come from/how they think of themselves, she was spot on. elitist probably. populist, to a slight degree. but, wrong, in the context of her target audience, definitely not.

    My point is, benign0, you were not the target audience. Monsod knew exactly who she was talking to, and she talked in a way that she knew her audience would understand. distilled, what she was saying to the UP students was “for pete’s sake, after you graduate, stay in the country and actually try to work from within to change it, instead of sending us paltry dollars. we need you working here dammit!” and i agree with her. most of those who finished in UP are almost exactly what we need in order to bring this country into the modern age. as Monsod said “Honor and Excellence”. UP already has the excellence, the goddamn Maroons need more “honor”, and balls, to stay here and help us instead of leaving us to rot.

    • ChinoF says:

      Since you put it that way, Mareng Winnie was pleading for these students not to leave… to make a “sacrifice.” Thing is, it does not really benefit them… or anyone… to put up with lower salaries in this country. In fact, it benefits the corrupt local elite that way, since potential people who could-have embarked on society-changing endeavors (like campaigning for charter change) will just be shut up by the difficulties of the local daily grind.

      By the way…. it’s a myth for me that when you leave the country for a job abroad, you’re not helping your country. Oh? Then would remittances not be considered help? I would believe the Filipinos abroad do just as much as, or even more than, Filipinos who stay in their country. Just ask this blog’s owner, BongV.

    • anonymous says:

      ““for pete’s sake, after you graduate, stay in the country and actually try to work from within to change it, instead of sending us paltry dollars. we need you working here dammit!””

      You forgot the part where our culture and system discourages individuals from utilizing their full potential and talents and  instead just treats every graduate like a cog in the machine, where they are expected to just be an employee (ie modern day slave) of corporations where they are bled dry until they die. If our society and culture actually based our whole system of meritocracy instead of rewarding connections, you’d know full well that the “best of the best” will have an incentive to stay and actually try to change something.

      It’s one thing to be an idealist, it’s another thing to be blinded fool. You know full well that the things we learn in our four years of college won’t even be applied in the real world due to the dysfunctional culture and system of our society. I find it a pity that our Engineers and Computer Science graduates are working at call centers troubleshooting tech related problems instead of actually building new stuff and actually advancing in fields of computing and artificial intelligence.

      Give that pep talk once change has been met then come back to us once its done. Monsod’s speech is nothing more than empty rhetoric.

    • krainierd says:

      Point with sacrificing your dream…when you sacrifice your dream, you sacrifice a part of yourself, that will hold you from your greatest potential which can actually benefit the future children. It’s great if you land in a good earning job that don’t get you in the poverty line (P10,000 for those with families) but one has to think about future costs of raising a child, which I think is a very huge amount even if you let your children go to the public system. Monsod is not being realistic even though she is addressing those who are graduates/graduation from UP.

  5. ChinoF says:

    Maybe going viral means that you’re actually pathogenic and need to be sneezed out… 😛

    Monsod’s opinion on not going abroad is really biased. I mean, what’s wrong with going abroad? Do you want to stay here and stay poor, or go abroad and help more people with the better salary that you earn? I’d say she’s succinctly putting down the OFWs… and may hint to anti-foreign sentiments. If that translates to an anti-foreign investment stance, then it betrays a sentiment of taking pride in being behind. That’s a pathogenic opinion indeed.

    Sneeze it out, folks. 😆

    • Cool says:

      Actually there are at least 4 options for UP students:

      Stay here and stay poor, and dont help
      Stay here and stay poor, and start the change and invest their talents here
      Go abroad, be rich, and dont help
      Go abroad, be rich, and help with the money and new knowledge from a foreign country

      What Monsod prefer is the 2nd option. And what she really didn’t like was the 3rd one. She was stating that UP students who chose the 3rd one should be “haunted” by her ghost. 

      • krainierd says:

        So she doesn’t want to go to heaven after she’s dead and stay as a ghost? 😛

        With her looks maybe she can get a scare or two…

  6. anonymous says:

    What is it with Filipinos that they forget what they have been taught in school and immediately revert back to their ideological mindset of the supposed duty of every Filipino to sacrifice their lives no matter how utterly dysfunctional, destructive or self-defeating such an action would constitute?

    Like all supposedly “educated” Filipino kuno, she once again shows us how blinded she to socio-economic realities due to her misplaced nationalism and pride. Filipinos are forced to work outside not because they want but because they have to. Furthermore, isn’t free flow of labor and capital between two countries part of international economics? It’s really sad that most of our perceived educated elite only parrot what they have been reading and teaching but don’t even understand the basic underlying concepts behind these theories.

    Monsod’s speech really shows how dysfunctional our society really is. Instead of looking at the facts and approach them with a scientific and critical approach, she like all Pinoys, once again shuns the scientific paradigm in favor of misplaced ideology. Frankly, I expected better from Monsod, given her educational attainment and considering the fact  that she is a professor from one of the most prestigious schools in the Philippines. I’m quite embarrassed that she’s even the Philippine’s poster girl for economics in the Philippine media but doesn’t even understand labor-capital relations in the larger scope of things. If this is really the “best” that the Philippines can offer regarding our intellectual “elite”, then goodluck Philippines, I just lost all hope for you! Her speech in fact suddenly made this tingling urge inside of me to leave the country before the culture of stupidity infects me.

  7. Antay-antayan says:

    I’m from UP and am abroad. So I guess the video speaks much to me. But if you actually watch the video and take time to understand it, you would have noticed that she was addressing UP students. The whole tirade about going abroad refers to doctors from PGH, all of whom are supposed to have committed to provide medical support to rural areas after they graduate. As much as I find Prof. Monsod part of the bigger systemic problem, she had some very good points and she was there to inspire UP students to not only be excellent but to have integrity. Do you ever think about this (integrity) when you write your cheap attempts at appearing smart and socially relevant?

    I find it funny how articles in this site flip-flop between accusations of being elitist, populist, anti-elitist, etc. What is it really? Please stop throwing around buzzwords and criticizing people just to appear intelligent.

    And yes, if our smart and skilled people were home and being productive, the country would be different. Obviously, we need an environment where these people can thrive and live up to their potential. This is the same for everyone else, including the masses. We need the right system to be able to flourish. Who will make this system happen? Certainly not the know-it-alls and the self-haters in this site.

    • anonymous says:

      You seem oblivious to the fact that our society doesn’t award revolutionary change and instead let our people happily sulk back to the way things are, being contented of what it is. I find it ironic that those who are ACTUALLY doing everything they can to bring TRUE change to the country are met with hostility and derision by the elite and the masses play along. Is it even a surprise why people who have actually opened their eyes have lost all hope for the country and move somewhere else? Individuals can only do so much given the unflinching attitude of the indolent indio. 

      BTW, if you have no idea just how dysfunctional our society is, read this link. It will tell you exactly why intellectuals are moving away from this godforsaken country:

      http://antipinoy.com/efficiency-and-effectivity-do-we-filipinos-know-the-difference/

      • Antay-antayan says:

        Thanks for replying to my comment and sharing the link. Honestly, I don’t find the article you shared relevant. I still don’t understand what type of “ACTUAL” and “TRUE” change you are talking about and what makes it revolutionary. I want change too, but I can’t say we’re on the same page unless I actually make sense of the stuff this site has been spewing. There’s just too much rhetoric and a mix of arrogance and self-loathing going around.
        The comparison between scientific Leon and brute-force Pablo does not ring a bell at all. Yes, there are a lot of brute-force Pablos in the Philippines, but I don’t think we necessarily put down the Leons. I know a lot Leons who are doing very well. Most of the Pablos, unless the are good looking or born rich and connected, don’t really succeed.
        One funny thing about the article is how it suddenly equates Pablo with the presidential system and Leon with the parliamentary system. A true non sequitur. I’m all for abolishing the Manila-centric presidential system and establishing one that is more representative, but I can’t lie and tell you that your arguments against it are sound. Like Leon, I’m a thinking Filipino after all.

  8. Hyden Toro says:

    I totally disagree with Prof. Monsod. The Brains in the Philippines; are being drained; because their country, cannot provide them good opportunities, good pay and good future for themselves and their families. If the OFWs will come home; the Philippines will be bankrupted. Take for example a U.P. graduate. If the U.P fellow is granted some good scholarship, like the Full Bright Scholarship in the U.S. Would you believe the fellow, will stay home for nationalistic reasons? Studying in foreign Universities, will expose you to a lot of learning; experiences and more learning. After you finish college. Foreign corporations will surely, recruit such Filipino graduates. They offer them offers they cannot refuse.They skim off the best and the brightest in the class. These Filipinos have seen the nonsense going on in their country. The strangle hold of the greedy politicians; the unabashed oligarchs; and the interfering dogmatic Church. That made the Filipino population stagnant in their own Dark Age. 😯

  9. inflame says:

    STAY AND BEGIN THE CHANGE
    that’s the fracking point of Monsod dammit! yes i know the culture sucks. yes i know half the population is stupid. yes i know 80% of the population is lazy. that is why, Monsod was aking those who showed the potential and those who HAVE the capability to change, that is UP students, to freaking STAY AND START THE CHANGE.
    leaving the country, deprives the country of at least the following things- a mind capable of responding quickly to the ever changing situation of the country- taxes (30% income tax, plus VAT, plus lots of small taxes that get added up)- multiplier factor (each high tech worker in the country requires at least 5 people to support him, directly or indirectly, thus more jobs for everyone. though it may not be high paying ones, mostly menial, but jobs nonetheless)those are the 3 that i can think of off the top of my head. remitting money from abroad is basically just a pittance compared to what you can do HERE AND NOW. unless you’re a businessman or someone who actually BRINGS jobs INTO the country, then you’re effectively taking away 1 more “resource” (i hate it when i have to treat people as resources), that the country could really use. yes, a Filipino scientist can currently do more in a US research institution, but his research belongs to the US. if he does his research here, granted if we fund it, it belongs TO THE PHILIPPINES.
    and dude, CS grads in call centers? they stay there because they are fucking LAZY. we’ve got IBM, Accenture, Lexmark, HP, Epson, Canon ALL LOOKING FOR PEOPLE. Sadly, the mediocrity/laziness of those idiots who thought CS/IT was easy keeps them there. jebus, we’ve got some corps giving 30000 peso incentives to someone who can recruit even a single qualified CS/IT professional. you don’t blame the corps, you don’t blame those who are in the industry, you blame those idiots who chose the easy way out.
    again, what Monsod was saying to the UP students was “For pete’s sake STAY AND BEGIN THE CHANGE”that was the message. because if they don’t start it, no one will. the first one will always feel the brunt of the effort so that those following will have it easier to build upon the foundations already set.
    so I pose the question to you ChinoF, anonymous. if Monsod’s students will not stay, then will you?and let me pose the question, what have YOU done? no, “engaging in discussion”, “encouraging people” and general rhetoric don’t count. i want quantifiable statistics. i want facts.

    • anonymous says:

      inflame, Monsod’s statement is just another one of those “inspirational” speeches that again DO NOT even address the core issues of our problem. Yes, we get her point (and yours) about people who have potential to stay and change the country but what good is that if the people themselves REFUSE to open their eyes about their shortcomings and ostracize these as a waste of time? That is my point. You are simply barking at the wrong tree. I don’t think anyone in here disagrees with you nor with Monsod that change is urgently needed but what I find distateful about with her speech is that she expects these intellectual elites to do everything without the masses even lifting a finger to do their part on the change. It doesn’t work that way. Change starts from the down-top and a change in status-quo. Nowhere in her speech does she even imply that.
      As rightly pointed out by benign0 (which is one of the rare times I agree with him regarding these issues) is that we Filipinos have this tendency to look for this Messianic figure that will help us all through these troubles without doing our part. It doesn’t work that way, revolutionary changes start from the grass-roots level and not up-down. Society must be revamped for change to happen. What she’s simply saying is stay for the sake of it and try to “help” the country without even enunciating how to achieve such goals nor to how to start such a movement. Again, it’s like what you hear in self-help and inspirational speeches that lifts your spirit high but in the end does nothing to really address the root cause of the problem. Again, her speech is simply empty rhetoric. 
      If you really want to start change then we must revamp our whole system and society. Violently overthrow the ruling class maybe or even have a radical change in the status-quo of our society. I didn’t even try to repeat what ChinoF said because he said it first, but it’s worth repeating:
      “In fact, it benefits the corrupt local elite that way, since potential people who could-have embarked on society-changing endeavors (like campaigning for charter change) will just be shut up by the difficulties of the local daily grind.”
      Which is true. People with lots of potential in here waste their talents because they are not given the support rightly needed to affect change in the country and are just delegated to another cog in the machine like the majority are. In such a situation, it puts down your spirit and the flame that wants to enact change is extinguished. Furthermore, just because you’re outside doesn’t mean you can’t help in your own little way. Resources truly needed in the country such as capital influx, the gained insights from research methodologies  (if employed in research institutions outside the country) and foreign education and technology transfers are also valuable assets to change our society. The Chinese did it, the Koreans did it, the Japanese did it and the Singaporeans did it, so why can’t we? Not helping because you’re outside the country is a cop-out.
      The problem here is not that these people don’t try to affect change (most idealists already have), it’s the fact that people REFUSE to listen and do their part, which again people like you and Monsod overlook.  Again, people need to change first before that can happen and maybe, just maybe, true change can begin to affect the country and not just another empty inspirational speech from someone so blinded about the shortcomings of our society.
      Monsod’s speech is a goody-two-shoes, try to lift up your spirits kind of speech devoid of any substance whatsoever. I hate that bullsh*t. We don’t need it here, we’ve had enough of it already. What Filipinos need is the tough, in your face, no-nonsense approach that will really drive everyone in a frenzy that people will wake up and realize their mistakes. Until then, people like Monsod (and knowing Monsod), will just be all talk.

    • ChinoF says:

      My dear Inflame,
      Whether I stay or go abroad is of equal weight. None is better or worse than the other. That would be the flaw in Monsod’s rhetoric.

      That lame “what have your done” question again. I have:
      1. Published a sci-fi fiction collection in the U.S. to show that Filipinos are not all backward peasant culture;
      2. Participated in this blog site and written eye-opening articles that reveal the true problems pulling our society down;
      It’s better you ask BongV this question, because although he’s out of the country, you should see the things he’s done to uplift this country. It can put you to shame. In fact, he may even give the notion that those out of the country are doing more to help it! 😉

      Alas, so “engaging in discussion” and “encouraging people” don’t count for you? Then you are looking for a biased answer to a loaded question. Good luck trying to find it from intelligent and unbiased people. 😛

      Now that I see that “Stay and Begin the Change” has been directed to medicine students, it shows that there’s no sense applying it to other professions. In fact, if so applied, it’s a disservice to Monsod’s true intention. And if so applied, it’s pure idealism. It’s myth. I believe I’ve said enough above… but I’ll repeat: it’s a myth that leaving the country and working abroad means that you’re not helping the country. It’s a very thoughtless assumption founded on nothing but misguided emo sentimentality.

    • krainierd says:

      The factors of growth you are saying do not consider the effect of remittances on the economy. Take for instance the money being sent by the OFW to his/her family here in the Philippines. They spent it on either daily needs, for the education of the children, or maybe buying their own house and lot. These generates a multiplier effect on consumer expenditures and even producing skilled individuals by getting them to school.

      Also, getting a good paying job that is suited to your qualifications needs a combination of luck, good timing, good connections (usually needs an elite connection). This is the reality of our job system here in the Philippines. 😦

  10. anonymous says:

    inflame, Monsod’s statement is just another one of those “inspirational” speeches that again DO NOT even address the core issues of our problem. Yes, we get her point (and yours) about people who have potential to stay and change the country but what good is that if the people themselves REFUSE to open their eyes about their shortcomings and ostracize these as a waste of time? That is my point. You are simply barking at the wrong tree. I don’t think anyone in here disagrees with you nor with Monsod that change is urgently needed but what I find distateful about with her speech is that she expects these intellectual elites to do everything without the masses even lifting a finger to do their part on the change. It doesn’t work that way. Change starts from the down-top and a change in status-quo. Nowhere in her speech does she even imply that.

    As rightly pointed out by benign0 (which is one of the rare times I agree with him regarding these issues) is that we Filipinos have this tendency to look for this Messianic figure that will help us all through these troubles without doing our part. It doesn’t work that way, revolutionary changes start from the grass-roots level and not up-down. Society must be revamped for change to happen. What she’s simply saying is stay for the sake of it and try to “help” the country without even enunciating how to achieve such goals nor to how to start such a movement. Again, it’s like what you hear in self-help and inspirational speeches that lifts your spirit high but in the end does nothing to really address the root cause of the problem. 
    Again, her speech is simply empty rhetoric. 

    If you really want to start change then we must revamp our whole system and society. Violently overthrow the ruling class maybe or even have a radical change in the status-quo of our society. I didn’t even try to repeat what ChinoF said because he said it first, but it’s worth repeating:

    “In fact, it benefits the corrupt local elite that way, since potential people who could-have embarked on society-changing endeavors (like campaigning for charter change) will just be shut up by the difficulties of the local daily grind.”

    Which is true. People with lots of potential in here waste their talents because they are not given the support rightly needed to affect change in the country and are just delegated to another cog in the machine like the majority are. In such a situation, it puts down your spirit and the flame that wants to enact change is extinguished. Furthermore, just because you’re outside doesn’t mean you can’t help in your own little way. Resources truly needed in the country such as capital influx, the gained insights from research methodologies  (if employed in research institutions outside the country) and foreign education and technology transfers are also valuable assets to change our society. The Chinese did it, the Koreans did it, the Japanese did it and the Singaporeans did it, so why can’t we? Not helping because you’re outside the country is a cop-out.

    The problem here is not that these people don’t try to affect change (most idealists already have), it’s the fact that people REFUSE to listen and do their part, which again people like you and Monsod overlook.  Again, people need to change first before that can happen and maybe, just maybe, true change can begin to affect the country and not just another empty inspirational speech from someone so blinded about the shortcomings of our society.

    Monsod’s speech is a goody-two-shoes, try to lift up your spirits kind of speech devoid of any substance whatsoever. I hate that bullsh*t. We don’t need it here, we’ve had enough of it already. What Filipinos need is the tough, in your face, no-nonsense approach that will really drive everyone in a frenzy that people will wake up and realize their mistakes. Until then, people like Monsod (and knowing Monsod), will just be all talk.

  11. benign0 says:

    ====begin quote
    STAY AND BEGIN THE CHANGE
    that’s the fracking point of Monsod dammit! yes i know the culture sucks. yes i know half the population is stupid. yes i know 80% of the population is lazy. that is why, Monsod was aking those who showed the potential and those who HAVE the capability to change, that is UP students, to freaking STAY AND START THE CHANGE.

    […]

    so I pose the question to you ChinoF, anonymous. if Monsod’s students will not stay, then will you?and let me pose the question, what have YOU done? no, “engaging in discussion”, “encouraging people” and general rhetoric don’t count. i want quantifiable statistics. i want facts.
    ====end quote

    @ Mr inflame,

    This is the simple philosophy that drove prosperity and achievement in great countries like the U.S.:

    Show me the money.

    Unfortunately, in the Philippines, there is none of that really fundamental motivation. You cannot motivate people with the sort of quaint platitudes Monsod dishes out in her video. As I wrote in a brilliant article a while back:

    Great nations were not built on good intentions. They were built on business sense. Real change in Pinoy society will never be achieved through the “sacrifice” of altruistic “heroes”. True change will be driven by people who find no shame in expecting a buck for their trouble.

    Deal with it dude. 😀

    • Antay-antayan says:

      @beniknok
      Is that why you spend so much time writing for this website? I doubt you make any money doing this. Or maybe your just some filthy mouthpiece for the sitting elite and big business, spewing useless crap to take our sights off of the real issues? You love the status quo so much I can hear you drooling from the thought of Arroyos, Estradas, Lucio Tans, Henry Sys taking notice of you and your pathetic paradigm for a better world.

  12. Miriam Quiamco says:

    I think Monsod singled out the doctors who got educated in the UP College of Medicine to somehow feel guilty about using their knowledge abroad since they got it at state subsidies.  I see her point, a medical degree is quite expensive anywhere, and when the state subsidizes it in the hope that these doctors could contribute to the health needs of the country, it irks when majority of them leave for better opportunities abroad.  I salute my cousin, a neuro-surgeon who did not even get educated at UP, only at a medical college in Cebu, got trained at a California hospital for his specialization for two years, but is now working for government hospitals in Mindanao.  Neuro-surgeons are pretty rare in the country, private practice could be pretty lucrative here and so they can afford to work in public hospitals for almost nothing.  

  13. inflame says:

    [[ — If you really want to start change then we must revamp our whole system and society. Violently overthrow the ruling class maybe or even have a radical change in the status-quo of our society. I didn’t even try to repeat what ChinoF said because he said it first, but it’s worth repeating:
    “In fact, it benefits the corrupt local elite that way, since potential people who could-have embarked on society-changing endeavors (like campaigning for charter change) will just be shut up by the difficulties of the local daily grind.” — ]]

    that’s what Monsod was aking the students man, to start the revamp. to forgo a bit of luxury and a bit of their dreams to actually revamp the system, and start the change in Philippine society. by god the Maroons are capable. all we need is for them have some balls and actually do it.

    benign0, i understand that money is the easiest and #1 priority for most of us. and pride/nationalism/patriotism is a distant near-last. what she’s asking is to forgo the money in the  short term and invest effort in to a longer-term view of the country being able to provide services/goods in the world again. to answer your “show me the money”, i’ll give you another cliche, “build it and they will come”.

    we need a larger pool of talent here for the foreign investors to actually think of the country as a viable investment. yes, we need the constitution changed too, but the talent comes first. once the talent is in place, and you’ve got a gazillion people with the capability, but not the opportunity screaming at the government to give them the opportunity, they’re gonna cave. or we take it by force. either way, we have talent in place, we’ve got investors ready and willing to come in, all we need is someone to actually do it.

    case in point: the IT industry. we’re close to India and China in terms of viability. And we’re more palatable to western corps since we’re not as autocratic as China and have closer to western values than India. IBM/Accenture/HP are all willing to pour more into the country, but we just don’t have the talent to fulfill their needs. India can pull 1000 IT professionals in a week. here, we’re lucky if we’re able to pull 100 talented guys in a month. we simply need MORE TALENT. foreign corps are already investing, and they’re willing to put in more. they just need a guarantee that their investment wont leave them. seriously, ask around in the high-tech sectors in Libis, Makati, Ortigas. you’ve got several corps trying to hire a whole lot of people because india is getting too expensive and China is too unstable, and they can’t fill their quotas, so they’re looking elsewhere. the world has a demand for talent, we’ve got a shitload of people, we just need to train them.

    put off earning a couple ten thousand for  5 years, and then begin to demand hundreds of thousands after that once the market is already there.

    • benign0 says:

      ===begin quote
      benign0, i understand that money is the easiest and #1 priority for most of us. and pride/nationalism/patriotism is a distant near-last.

      what she’s asking is to forgo the money in the  short term and invest effort in to a longer-term view of the country being able to provide services/goods in the world again. to answer your “show me the money”, i’ll give you another cliche, “build it and they will come”.
      […]
      put off earning a couple ten thousand for  5 years, and then begin to demand hundreds of thousands after that once the market is already there.
      === end quote

      Sorry to say, Mr. inflame that the opportunity to invoke that sort of idealism has long past its expiry date.

      Much of the goodwill capital of the sort that could draw upon idealism has been squandered — the 1986 Edsa revolution for example saw dozens of losers rip up their Green Cards or whatever other passports they had to greener pastures abroad in anticipation of the great big “Hope” that all the platitudes dished out during that euphoric period promised.

      Even now, Noynoy too, thanks to his deep well of ha-ha gaffes, is squandering much of the promise he had planted into the minds of the fools who voted for him.

      In short, MONEY stands tall and ALONE as the only scorekeeper for a better future in the eyes of the Filipino. And guess what, it is in short supply in our islands and what little of it is left is spread thin across 100 million intellectually bankrupt people.  😀

      • inflame says:

        so what’s next then? to each his own? forget fighting for your ideas/beliefs and just join the rat race? as long as i get mine, tough luck on the rest of you? go ahead and leave the country and just send a pittance back? but you’re sending dollars back, so everything is ok. you’re driving consumerism, not actually creating wealth. and wealth creation is what drives economies, not consumption.

        so now that we’ve got nothing to motivate us except money, we all turn to it and say “greed is good” or “money is what makes the world go round”. is that it?

        we’re all talking about wanting to change the country, revamping the system, de-toothing the oligarchy, returning the power to the people, actually inspiring/bringing light to the masses. question is, who’s going to ACTUALLY DO IT?

        if not the Maroons who believe in or should stand by “Honor and Excellence”, then who?

      • benign0 says:

        Life’s not all black-and-white, Mr inflame. You can do both “fighting for your ideas/beliefs” AND “join the rat race”. Nothing’s stopping you from doing both.

        That is why there is a free market that is tempered by regulation. Elements in the private sector compete in that free market and the state applies regulation to create a fair and just environment for said competition.

        Is that difficult to comprehend?

        I think it is for you. You know why? The clue to this headscratching I see on your part is what you say here:

        so now that we’ve got nothing to motivate us except money, we all turn to it and say ‘greed is good’ or ‘money’ is what makes the world go round’. is that it?

        Apparently you have a mind conditioned by this typically-Pinoy notion that money is inherently bad, and greed is inherently destructive. Guess what, life evolved to its complex form today on the basis of greed — a harsh environment DROVE evolution to ensure that the fittest, cleverest, and most resilient creatures lived long enough to pass on their genes to the next generation.

        This “greed” for resources is what molded all life forms. Same principle applies to the development of our society. You just need to get past this notion of greed as “evil” that was ingrained in your head by that typically-Pinoy victim mentality upbringing.

        Thus your question “if not the Maroons who believe in or should stand by ‘Honor and Excellence’, then who?” can be answered quite simply:

        Apply honour and excellence in your pursuit of wealth whether that wealth be in the form of money or any other form of currency which you choose to measure your happiness and personal fulfilment by.

        It’s simple, really™ — though not for the small-minded. 😉

        =======
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      • BongV says:

        there is “Honor and Excellence” in pursuing prosperity – not egalitarian misery 😉

  14. Antay-antayan says:

    Thanks for replying to my comment and sharing the link. Honestly, I don’t find the article you shared relevant. I still don’t understand what type of “ACTUAL” and “TRUE” change you are talking about and what makes it revolutionary. I want change too, but I can’t say we’re on the same page unless I actually make sense of the stuff this site has been spewing. There’s just too much rhetoric and a mix of arrogance and self-loathing going around.

    The comparison between scientific Leon and brute-force Pablo does not ring a bell at all. Yes, there are a lot of brute-force Pablos in the Philippines, but I don’t think we necessarily put down the Leons. I know a lot Leons who are doing very well. Most of the Pablos, unless the are good looking or born rich and connected, don’t really succeed.

    One funny thing about the article is how it suddenly equates Pablo with the presidential system and Leon with the parliamentary system. A true non sequitur. I’m all for abolishing the Manila-centric presidential system and establishing one that is more representative, but I can’t lie and tell you that your arguments against it are sound. Like Leon, I’m a thinking Filipino after all.

  15. inflame says:

    then it is at this point that our opinions diverge. you chose “the personal pursuit of happiness” and that if your pursuit brings the country along to progress, well and good. while Monsod is aking that a few, if not all, of her audience realign their priorities to helping instigate change alongside their “personal pursuit of wealth”. i never believed that “money is evil”. hell i have a lack of it. i can provide for my own, with some choice luxuries.

    as for “greed” driving evolution, it isn’t, never did, and never will. the basis for “success” in evolution is survival. we’re the only species that exhibits greed, meaning acquiring more than what is needed for survival. surviving in harsh environments and propagating your species within the environmental parameters is the measure of “winning” in evolution. though nobody ever wins at that since the environment always changes.

    i get it, “the individual before society”. i do believe that, and actually live it. but in cases like what Monsod is saying, i believe it becomes “the individual as part or alongside society, equally and together, in good times and bad”. bongV, i’m not against prosperity, i’m all for it. what i’m against is, prosperity for oneself only even if you can and do see problems around you and you refuse to help. i know educating the stupid is tiresome work, and is very punishing, but if all of us who understand the situation, do take some time to educate them, and not give up, we can and will make a difference.

    as for the free market and regulation thereof, hell, im all for it. i actually understand that there needs to be a balance. we’re not arguing economics here. we’re arguing what and for who Monsod’s message is. that’s why in my first comment I clearly stated that Monsod’s message was first and foremost, for the Maroons under her, and that her message was, for them to stay and pay back what the state paid for their education.

    • BongV says:

      when society is unable to provide for an individual – either an individual changes society or society changes the individual or both, or the individual chooses a society that is more attuned to his beliefs and lifestyles – why stick around with losers? what’s the point in helping people who don’t want to help themselves? they can screw themselves thank you very much.

      • inflame says:

        then Monsod’s point of the Maroon paying back the investment PLUS interest stands. after all, the state/university invested in them via subsidized fees. so it’s fair that the state/university collects right?

      • BongV says:

        the taxpayers invested in the state university – the taxpayers ought to get their returns as needed – with no prejudice to geographic location – domestic or overseas.

      • anonymous says:

        You make it sound as if UP students ARE the only ones using the government subsidies. For the record, everyone uses government subsidies. For example, everyone uses or enjoys:

        1) Roads
        2) Government public schools
        3) Government buildings
        4) Government parks
        5) Government National Defense
        6) Government Medicines
        7) Government Hospitals, etc

        By your logic, everyone should stay here too no matter how dysfunctional or fruitless it is.

    • Old says:

      Well said Inflame.

  16. inflame says:

    agreed bongV. again, the video already states that. Monsod presented two options acceptable to her
    – stay
    – pay up the initial investment plus interest 

    • benign0 says:

      Cite the Constitutional basis for this directive, plez. 😀

      • anonymous says:

        The constitution is only a a municipal law which states the limitations of the powers of government and the directive for government and its officials, not the actions of the people itself. 

        Non-sequitur. Herp Derp.

      • anonymous says:

        Wow, I just accidentally “bolded” all words directly below the quote above. Looks like I’ve found a new bug to exploit. lol

  17. Hyden Toro says:

    Give incentives for people to stay. They will stay…

    • I am says:

      Since the topic of Monsod’s lecture is clearly limited to UP constituents, I take it that by saying “people”, you mean the students of UP right? Isn’t subsidized education enough incentive? The millions of peso worth of education for one UP student is not enough for us to stay and start the solution here?

      • ChinoF says:

        Millions of pesos per one UP student? That needs to be verified.

        And I still disagree with Monsod that they should stay in order to help with change. They can still go abroad and still help with change. One should look at actual UP med students going abroad who are STILL helping out in some way in the country. It’s an unguided emotionalistic opinion to say that going abroad means you’re abandoning your country.

        Think also that there are hard up parents and families waiting for the students to graduate and sustain them. Could they do that effectively on a P8,000-P12,000 monthly local salary? I seriously doubt it. So what if the students tell thelr parents, “I can’t go for the abroad job since I want to follow Monsod and put up with the hardship here to try and help change.” Say they get only P12,000 as an orderly at a public hospital. Like I said, they are too busy making ends meet, that they couldn’t worry about change anymore. That’s what the local oligarchs would love.

        Wouldn’t they be more helpful if they earned P65,000/month at a foreign workplace, and the money they send home could be used to fund real change initiatives that the parents or siblings of the OFW could take over, such as charter change or even just livelihood and orphanage support projects? That’s what Benign0 and BongV have been pointing out under the arguments the opponents branded as “pro-greed.” It’s actually practicality.

        Again, but I can’t emphasize it more, it is a myth is that being abroad means you’re not helping the country. Stop demonizing the OFWs – including the UP med students who decided to strike it abroad.

      • anonymous says:

        What will you gain by subsidizing education if after you graduate you’re still relegated as just another commodity to be exploited by the elite? If I were a graduate of UP myself, I would earn my fortune somewhere else. Let’s be realistic, there’s no incentive to stay because the government and businesses here provides nothing for our intellectual graduates. All their talents will just be wasted.

      • Hyden Toro says:

        U.P. graduates unfortunately have to make a living; after their graduation. Some young graduates are fed up with the nonsense in their country. Some wants adventure; and more learning; more exposures to new experiences. If they cannot find these opportunities in their country. The will surely leave. Some came back. Some did not return. Is it not the government sponsoring the mass exodus of these brains? It is an active advocate of the OFW program. Why point blame on U.P. graduates, becoming OFW themselves? To put guilt on them?

      • Miriam Quiamco says:

        Monsod seems to think that the UP grads are a different breed from the majority, as she put it, creme de la creme of the population and therefore, they have to stay in order to help move the country forward.  I wonder though if her description of UP students is not an exaggeration.  How many UP grads and students formed part of the yellow zombies, didn’t many members of the Makati Business Club and many top bureaucrats who are UP graduates support the most incompetent presidential candidate in the past election?  Where is the critical thinking of the creme de la creme?????

      • BongV says:

        not all the creme de la creme went to UP.

        .. btw – for laughs – http://home.netcom.com/~pereyes/collegia.html

        Choosing a Boyfriend

        Three Collegialas were discussing their choices in the kind of guy one should date.

        1st Collegiala: “If you want someone who’s really handsome, get someone from La Salle.”

        2nd Collegiala: “Yeah, but if you want a date who’s smart, you’ll want someone from UP.”

        3rd Collegiala: “Of course if you want both, you’d want an Atenean.”

      • miriam quiamco says:

        Yeah BongV, and I happen to be part Atenean, first two years of my university education and University of San Carlos for the last two. I agree Ateneans are both intellectually and physically attractive!!!

  18. Old says:

    No constitutional basis is needed Benigno. This is beyond any constitutional law.

    • benign0 says:

      Well, we need a baseline in this discussion, don’t we? Mr inflame here is making assertions to the effect that what Monsod is “encouraging” us to believe in is imperative of any “honourable” citizen of our sad Republic.

      So the baseline we can set is constitutional for now. Now since you say this goes “beyond” said baseline, then explain, plez: Beyond “any constitutional law” to where or what exactly?

      Cite specifics, plez. Otherwise, debating on the basis of these quaint platitudes you guys use won’t make this “debate” any more sound than the moronic stuff we see on ABS-CBN everyday. 😀

  19. inflame says:

    please benign0, don’t drag force me/us to say “it’s a nationalistic” or “be patriotic” because you’re baiting. that’s EXACTLY what you want me to say so you can shoot it down.

    yes, Monsod is appealing to emotion, patriotism and nationalism, self-sacrifice and emo sentimentality as ChinoF calls it. we get it, you’re cold logical intelligent people.

    Monsod’s message was :
    The State wants/prefers that her citizens return the investment it has given to the UP students in either
    – staying and helping
    – paying the investment in full PLUS interest.

    The State CAN enforce its will if it wants to. Have you known DOST scholars who have hold-departure orders at Immigration due to their scholarships? I do, and there are times that they have had to justify the need for them to leave the country. Currently it doesn’t, freedom to travel and all for the Maroons. They’ve got it slightly better than the DOST scholars who have it in their scholarship contracts that they will be prevented from leaving the country for some time after graduation.

    So yeah, all Monsod has is an appeal to emotion, but that doesn’t detract from the message. when you KNOW that logic will tell you otherwise, emotion is your only recourse. She admitted as much already in her speech. so stop being to technical, nitpicky and so high and mighty. we’re in this shit together, we might as well work together in any way we can, and try to make converts in any way we can.

    ChinoF, those abroad ARE helping. yes, they definitely are. but they could do more if they stayed, because of the “multiplier effect”. each highly trained professional needs around 5 more people to assist him in his job. Case in point, a surgeon. you need 2 nurses, an anesthesia tech, a janitor to clean up the OR, and a clerk for the paperwork. possibly even more than that. so yes, it’s not a directly measurable effect, but it does exist.

    As for millions per UP student, let’s take a standard 5-year Engineering course. Since UP is subsidized, BUT the quality is comparable to ADMU or DLSU, lets use their fees. let’s say 40-50k per semester at current rates? so that’s roughly 80-150k per year if you consider DLSU’s trimester system. at 5 years, that’s 400-750k at 5 years. So yeah, less than a million for a student. But what if he has a scholarship, lives on campus and gets allowances too? so let’s bring it to an even 700k-1M.  so yeah, she might be exaggerating the exact figure, but close to a million in educational costs? so yeah, you bet she’s gonna ask for payback.

    • ChinoF says:

      Myth/logical fallacy alert: “cold logical intelligent people” Are all logical intelligent people cold? 😉

      Thank you for some quantification, especially with engineering students. You also brought up the state scholars, Yes, the state can enforce its rules. But that doesn’t mean those rules are always correct. The state and investors in these scholarships should think whether their scholar earning P12,000 locally will pay back the investment better than the ones earning P65,000 abroad and who remit money that helps the local economy. Some scholars are kept from going abroad because of the condition of the scholarship, as you described; but then don’t you think that such conditions are counter-productive?

      Thus, I still disagree they do better if they stay. You’re thinking of the job requirements. I’m thinking of their basic needs. True, we have job shortages here. But forcing the graduates to stay and work here isn’t going to solve our problems, because of the conditions I mentioned above. I argue that it will contribute to those problems too. The scholars want jobs so they could feed their families, not because they want to fill job shortages. So the state scholars should sacrifice the families they are trying to feed just so they can fill the local jobs that have crappy pay and tyrannical bosses? They deserve more dignity. That’s why I agree that it’s OK for such scholars to go abroad. Will you take away the chance to feed their families in a better way?

      In the end, it boils down to this: one works not because of the work. One works because of the pay. If they pay can’t support you in life, then the work’s not worth it. The students went into medical school not because they wanted to fill job shortages, but because they wanted good jobs, meaning, good pay. I mean, who goes to college just because they want to fill job shortages? If the scholarship terms prevent such students from getting good jobs, then such conditions deserve to be questioned.

      If some students choose to stay, OK then. Just wait for them to complain that they can’t feed their family well, because of the low salary (not enough to feed their family with), or couldn’t afford their father’s hospitalization (could this be part of the reason they went to medical school? Free medical service for their poor family?). Will the hospitals they work at give that needed free medical service (or even a hefty discount)? If they could find that, lucky for them, because I have the impression such hospitals with job shortages are mostly too poor to pay their employees well (and that’s why they have shortages!).

      Who is colder? Those with “emotion, patriotism and nationalism, self-sacrifice and emo sentimentality” who want scholars to make do with low salaries to fill up job shortages as part of their “national duty?” Or the “logical intelligent people” who say, let them go abroad because they can help more that way?

      Thus, I believe following Monsod’s advice in her speech can be counter-productive, and is actually cold, because Monsod herself did not consider these aspects I discussed.

      • inflame says:

        come on, you really had to pick apart “cold logical intelligent people”? but i’ll indulge you.
        you’ve heard of “cold hard logic” right? and that “being logical” has been equated to “being intelligent”? you really had to pick on the what you perceive as an improper use of a figure of speech. come on man.

        but on to your main point. an engineer earning php12k a month is NOT getting what he is worth and should try to get a better offer by either negotiating, or walking away. yes, doing so has risks, but if 80% of the actually competent engineers start demanding what they’re worth, the corps/investors WILL pay, otherwise they will not have enough engineers. working for a corp is a 2-way street. im selling my services to a corp for a price and if they decide to buy my services by hiring me, then we have a deal. if one party changes the terms of the deal, the other party can either agree, renegotiate or walk away. i know it’s a culture thing, and will need some weaning away. but as an employee, you are not a slave. you have rights. you better know what those rights are, and what you are worth, then negotiate acceptable terms of employment. it’s a Filipino cultural fault that most don’t actually ask for better terms. most just take the offer or walk away, not knowing that negotiation is an option. Case in point, the IT industry. I’ve met people who were getting peanuts because they did not know how much they were worth and the corp paid them low. while i’ve met other who are actually worth less (after having worked with them), getting higher salaries because they had the guts to bullshit their way through the interview. so again, being an employee is not bad. you just have to treat yourself as kind of a small corp and value yourself according to your talents, and sell yourself as that to a prospective employer.

        if enough people demand for better pay, and actually deliver something worth that higher pay, corps wouldn’t be against it. a 6-digit monthly salary isn’t unreasonable for an engineer as long as he guarantees his work is excellent and delivers on time and on/under budget.

        on enforcing “hold-departure orders”. no i don’t think it’s unfair. upon getting that scholarship, or getting into a state university (if implemented), you KNOW what you’re getting into. it in your contract. you should have read it, including the fine print, and decided whether you liked it or not BEFORE you signed, and not went ahead then asked for a change of terms after you signed. there’s a term for that, it’s called “breach of contract”. and it’s a legal offense. so, if you accepted a scholarship with those terms, shut up and fulfill those terms. you can’t have your cake and eat it too.

        working for the pay. or as you can say it “i work to live, not live to work”. i wholeheartedly agree. there’s nothing wrong with that. but before deciding what to work on, try to do some research first if the market you’re entering actually has a need. you can’t go into nursing not knowing that thousands are already unemployed but qualified. so yeah, if you want a job, and a good paying one at that without feeling forced to “live to work”, don’t choose a career/sector that’s saturated. but if you chose a career that you actually “love”, quit whining about the pay. you chose that path. you could have worked at somewhere you didn’t like but got you rich. and yes, the state could help a bit here. funding for people who want to go into long-term basic scientific research would help a bit as basic research that’s given to the public domain is a good basis for a sound manufacturing base.

      • ChinoF says:

        Well, I guess you know what I mean, anyway. And you agree with Monsod, I don’t. Guess we’ll just have to see what the real world will show on whether her advice in the speech was sound after all. But I’m wagering it will prove her wrong.

      • ChinoF says:

        Oh yes, it will boil down to one of the advocacies of this blog site: charter change. If we do not remove or reduce economic protectionism and allow foreign investment to lead to creation of more local jobs, then there will always be state scholars who’ll want to defy the conditions of their scholarship and look for work abroad. They’ll be trapped by the poverty conditions of their local scenario. But want to keep them here? Fight for charter change.

      • peste says:

        Chino,

        You are on to something about the hold departure order on DOST scholars. I think it is still there mainly because it hasn’t been legally challenged in our courts. I think AP could explore if indeed there is something wrong with this contractual obligation.

        Inflame,
        Investors also have the option to choose someone else that would accept a lower pay and still offer the same quality of service.

    • benign0 says:

      ====quote begin
      So yeah, all Monsod has is an appeal to emotion, but that doesn’t detract from the message. when you KNOW that logic will tell you otherwise, emotion is your only recourse. She admitted as much already in her speech. so stop being to technical, nitpicky and so high and mighty. we’re in this **** together, we might as well work together in any way we can, and try to make converts in any way we can.
      ====quote end

      Indeed, Mr inflame, just like all Noynoy had to offer to the Pinoy electorate was an appeal to emotion. The aversion of emo-Pinoys to what you refer to as the “technical, nitpicky and so high and mighty” (in favour of the nebulous but seductive) is what get bozos like him, Erap, Trillanes, and all those hare-brained celebrities elected into influential positions in government.

      Compare that to societies populated by “technical, nitpicky and so high and mighty” people — Germany, Switzerland, Japan, Singapore, China, Korea, etc. These are societies that apply a Vulcan approach to doing stuff, pay close attention to detail, and (here’s a new concept for you) think things through carefully.

      So yes, there is a case to be made for applying a serious mind to the serious business of building a nation. Go to emotion as your “only recourse” and you go down the EASY path that lower life forms go. Humans reached the pinnacle of evolution (for now at least) because of the development of gray matter and thinking faculties that overcame primal impulses driven mainly by emotion.

      Your proposal to look to emotion as one’s “only recourse” is a proposal to move BACKWARDS rather than forwards. Not surprising therefore that an entire society of people who think the way you do results in the sort of chronic backwardness we see in the Philippines today. 😀

      • ChinoF says:

        Hmm, I’d add, if emotion is Monsod’s only recourse to these UP students, then she’s lost it, and thus has produced unsound advice because of it.

      • inflame says:

        because she knows logic WILL FAIL. and she’s got nothing else. emotion is her last piece of ammunition.

        when you’ve got your back to the wall, and you’ve got nothing else, what have you got to lose by appealing to emotion? again, you may not like the message, but the message wasn’t for you. it was for the Maroons.

        and dude, Noy and Monsod are leagues apart. Monsod tempers her arguments. Noy doesn’t even have any. and i am NOT being emotional. all i’m saying is, there’s time to be Vulcan, and there’s time to be Human. Monsod was being human and was trying to talk to someone human. and if you’re still feeling Vulcan, be logical enough to admit that you weren’t the audience.

      • BongV says:

        morons or maroons.. or moronic maroons… same same. it may appear that the audience appeals only to the student – BUT the maroons, and Monsod forget – TAXPAYERS pay for the state university. Therefore, TAXPAYERS – considering that there’s a segment whose income outperforms other segments by a factor of 1 is to forty two – on whom the state university depends on – is called SHOOTING ITSELF IN THE FOOT. or FOOT IN MOUTH DISEASE. Time for Monsod to retire.

      • ChinoF says:

        But still, the quote as mentioned above… and I’ll quote it again:

        “If you are going to help this country, you’ve got to be in the country. If any of you have ambitions of going abroad so that you can earn more, please disabuse yourself, because by doing that, you are essentially betraying the people in the Philippines who trusted you and who invested their money in you,”

        You’re right, it’s emotion she uses because logic fails her here (or is it that she fails to be logical)… but what she said is still plain fallacious. Is all.

      • BongV says:

        if there is a lower ROI from staying in the Philippines why single out those who opt for bigger ROI by going overseas? it’s plain outright moronic.

        take for instance the so-called BPO market – don’t you think that foreign investors wouldn’t get the idea of hiring Filipinos if they did not have initial exposure to the skill of the overseas Filipinos – who actually made representations and negotiated the outsourcing of operations to the Philippines.

        allow me to take you through the typical lifecycle of a BPO deal:

        It starts as a consulting gig.

        the load picks up

        the consultant transitions from doing the job himself – but farms it out to his network.

        farming out no longer suffices, consultant hires temps

        temps no longer suffice, they become permanent

        consultant and company ink a BPO deal

        had they stayed behind a decrepit government desk job – they will be counting their contributions to the economy in terms of individual taxes. by going overseas they were able to create industries for the people back home. the BPO did not emerge by magic – heck, I was doing it before the word was coined.

        I was willing to go into 20/80 equity stock as industrial partner of a foreign VC – only to find out I can’t do it because the constitution says it should be 60/40 – IT SUCKS BIG TIME specially that I have projects lined up in nearly all the major industries – with transparency and liberalization – the oligarchs can be given really tough competition – send another dog to get a dog.

  20. inflame says:

    bongV, that’s why she was aking for the Maroons to pay back the state/taxpayers’ investment in them by either
    a.) staying and working here (meaning they get their income taxed, and any and all expenses taxed with VAT too, and incidentally driving the economy)

    or

     b.) paying back the investment in full plus interest

    or do you disagree with that? if so, what was the message that you thought Monsod was trying to say?

    • BongV says:

      monsod was singling out a solution – staying in the philippines – as if it were an optimal solution. at this juncture of history, the UP is supported by people who have left overseas. to make it appear that going overseas is ungrateful is a fallacy. i will tell you right now – of two classmates of mine from davao city high school, who went to UP and proceeded to UP Med, upon graduation took the USMLE, passed it – and now have thriving practices – and they support a lot of Philippine charities. medical mission lang and donations of medical equipment are a dime a dozen. had they stayed and “sacrificed” in a decripit provincial health office somewhere, content in the adulation of the clueless – i don’t think they’ll have the corinthian gardens lifestyle they enjoy now – nor will the UP enjoy the thousands of dollars pured into their endowment funds. get real will ya.

      • inflame says:

        she did single out a solution which she wanted. but she did give an alternative.
        which was “pay up the investment plus interest”.

        so you didn’t like her primary goal. but did you listen to her secondary goal and try to understand it from her point of view? and UP being supported by overseas donations/endowments? what percentage of their operating budget and capital expense outlay comes from those endowments? last i checked, UP’s budget comes from government coffers. the alumni donations, at best, help a it’s activities/celebrations.

        and yes, i’d call leaving right after graduation ungrateful. or maybe selfish. we taxpayers paid for their education. we might as well get our money’s worth. as for high school classmates, about half of my 85-person DOST-funded batch went to UP, the rest scattered ADMU, DLSU and top end regional schools. 90% of us stayed for 3 years after graduation and fulfilled our ends of our contracts by working here and creating wealth in the country. 80% are still in country by choice because are earning what we are worth, equivalently had we left the country. our productivity/standards/wages are equivalent to global standards because we worked for them, and demanded them from our employers. and our employers gave us what we wanted because we could prove to them that we could create wealth for them, much more efficiently in-country. thus, by us staying here, and convincing the multinational corps we work for that they can find people like us in-country, they came and have hired those who finished in the same high school as us. so yes, i can say that we, as a group, although bound by the contracts we signed knowingly when we were younger, have created much more wealth in our economy, than those of our age who have left the country and are sending in, at most 20k a  month of consumer-driven spending.

      • BongV says:

        by putting up with the skewed 60/40 environment which ties the foreign multinationals to the oligarchy – I’d say your “contribution” is dwarfed by the loss of investments that went to Singapore, Vietnam – which makes UP maroons one of the causes of why the Philippine economy is losing out in ASEAN and globally – not to mention that the lifeblood of the domestic-oriented multinationals are driven by consumer-driven spending fuelled by whaddya know… overseas money

      • miriam quiamco says:

        I don’t understand this endless disagreement on who is contributing more to the economic growth in the Philippines, the OFWs or those who opted to stay. Both groups have done their part and have stayed true to their individual callings. It would be hypocritical to endure the unendurable for one whose consciousness is not geared towards staying to be a cog in wealth creation machine that one does not feel efficient enough to satisfy his individual aspirations. We live in a free world, the world has progressed based on those who have adventurous spirits, think of America and the original settlers. It was their ethos for life and adventure that inspired the founding of a truly free nation. OFWs too are doing their part in strengthening our economy and so those who stay. Monsod was just being authoritarian when hectoring UP graduates to stay and serve their country. I actually don’t find her speech inspirational, she was being grandmotherly and not logical at all. If I may say so, she was being very unfair to those UP graduates who are entitled to decide on what is good for them.

  21. anonymous says:

    @inflame

    You make it sound as if UP students ARE the only ones using or enjoying government subsidies. For the record, EVERYONE uses government subsidies. For example, everyone uses or enjoys:
    1) Roads2) Government public schools3) Government buildings4) Government parks5) Government National Defense6) Government Medicines7) Government Hospitals, etc
    By your logic, everyone should stay here too no matter how dysfunctional or fruitless it is.

    • BongV says:

      you have a situation where

      1) foreign equity is prevented from pouring investments into education due to the constitutional restrictions and the additional restrictions in the FINL – Foreign Investments Negative List. this reduces the state’s ability to provide greater access to education for a wider number of people; and,

      Under a liberalized market – education could have been more accessible as there are more options being provided by the private sector – options which are not being provided by public institutions due to lack of funding.

      But since this is not present – education is limited to DOMESTIC-OWNED lousy secular and crappy sectarian schools – which keeps access to education in the hands of the pampered few.

      The access to education is already reduced due to the restrictive policy environment, then it is made worse by reducing the education budget – quite an explosive cocktail we have.

      • anonymous says:

        I agree with you that public education is sorely lacking in the Philippines. What I just wanted to show though was the faulty reasoning of inflame since everyone pays taxes out of their pocket and uses government allocated funds (ie subsidies) to public goods in the form of roads, government defense, education, etc. By his logic, everyone should stay despite the Philippines already being a hellhole.

        It’s faulty reasoning at best and shallow at worst.

  22. inflame says:

    and bongV, i don’t disagree that the constitution needs to be changed to address the 60/40 problem.

    and comparing my contributions to the “losses” we have due to investments going to SG/Vietnam, it’s really comparing apples to oranges. compare MY contributions to those Filipinos who LEFT.

    and most multinationals aren’t a 60/40 situation. what we’ve got here, especially in the IT and BPO industries are wholly owned subsidiaries. they got them because of the deals they made. IBM/HP/Canon/Accenture/Intel/Lexmark/Dell tied to the oligarchy? i don’t think so. those guys are beholded to US shareholders. true, they might have had to bribe their way in, but they’re not the 60/40 you make them to be. those guys don’t have shares here. they’re not even traded in the PSE.

    and “domestic-oriented multinationals are driven by consumer-driven spending”? you mean Procter&Gamble/Coca-Cola Corp? the profits of those corps go outside the country. at best the country earns 20-30% in taxes. the rest leave the country. so you’ve got OFW money coming in and being spent by consumers in buying products from multinational corps. if the OFW sends in 10000php, and it’s spent entirely, the government will be lucky to collect 3000 in taxes considering that what consumers are spending on are products of multinationals. whereas in my case, im actually creating wealth here, inviting multinats to come and invest here. thus, not only does my income get taxed at 30-35%, my spending get taxed another 10-20%, my investments another 10-20%, my corp’s (although a subsidiary) income also gets taxed as a business by 30%. and anyone who supports in in my job (janitors/clerks/admin) also gets taxed in the same way.

    so compared to an OFW’s 10k sent here, my 10k actually does more work because of externalities, like the multiplier effect, which need to be factored in.

    again sir, i am not in disagreement with the general thought. i’m disagreeing with the specific instances you’re citing.

    • BongV says:

      hate to burst your bubble but – IBM/HP/Canon/Accenture/Intel/Lexmark/Dell Philippine corporations may have American names – but the shares of equity have to comply with the constitution – 60% local equity – 40% foreign – check the corporate registration papers – no ifs and buts. Their only way out is if they are in EPZA zone and 60% of their products are for export.

      Take for example Coca Cola Bottlers Philippines Inc

      In 1927, San Miguel secured the first non-US national Coca-Cola bottling and distribution franchise. The company owned 70 percent of the joint venture, which grew to become Coke’s sixth largest operation. By the early 1990s, San Miguel had captured over two-thirds of the domestic soft drink market.

      1997 – CCA acquires Coca-Cola Bottlers Philippines, Inc from San Miguel Corporation and the Coca-Cola Company through a share placement which gives San Miguel a 25% shareholding in CCA.

      1997: San Miguel exchanges its 70 percent stake in Coca-Cola Bottlers Philippines, Inc. for a 25 percent interest in the Australian firm Coca-Cola Amatil Limited (CCA).

      2000 – CCA sells Coca-Cola Bottlers Philippines, Inc to San Miguel Corporation. The transaction involved the cancellation of all of San Miguel’s and some of The Coca-Cola Company’s shares in CCA.

      2001: Pure Foods Corporation, producer of processed meats and flour, is acquired; San Miguel joins forces with the Coca-Cola Company to reacquire Coca-Cola Bottlers Philippines, relinquishing its stake in CCA as part of the deal.

      Coca Cola Bottlers Philippines – foreign sounding name – but owned by San Miguel Corporation – a Filipino corporation owned by an oligarch.

      With access to registration papers, we can have a same drill – and get to the bottom of the all the BPOs subsidiaries you enumerated – and I kid you not, it can’t go beyond 40% foreign equity – because that’s what the constitution says.

      ****

      what are you complaining about their profits – you got paid to do the job, if you don’t like what you are making – negotiate or find another job, if you can – or create your own job – if you have access to capital.

      it is not the multinational’s fault if the government is inefficient in tax collection. the multinational is in the business of making a profit.

      true you are taxed XYZ percent – BUT your tax in absolute terms is still small – 30% of $800/month vs 5% of $4000/month remitted – compared to the FUND INFUSIONS from overseas – which did not use any local resources for that matter – that’s a pittance. if all OFWs were to return to the Philippines – they wouldn’t be able to generate the same absolute figures due to the lower compensation scheme.

      think about it – a nurse in the Philippines pays 30% taxes on income of PhP 20,000 – roughly $500 – that’s $150 per month in taxes – as you claim. that same nurse when she goes overseas – makes roughly $5500 per month – of that she sends roughly 10% to the Philippines – that’s $500 – her 10% is easily three times your 30% tax.

      so on the net alone – the nurse already outspent your $150 bywith her $500 on a monthly basis. net of which puts her at $350 and you at zero.

      then factor in your sales taxes – the taxes her remittances were spent on – generated more sales taxes – she feeds more mouths than you do – and at higher prices – MANY TIMES OVER.

      • inflame says:

        also hating to burst your bubble, but most of those corps, IBM/HP/Canon/Accenture/Intel/Lexmark/Dell, ARE in EPZA zones. Coke, may have “franchised” the name to SMC, because they wanted in the Philippine economy. And since it’s a consumer good, they probably had to. so yes, i grant you Coke-SMC. but for the new high-tech industries, they sure aren’t coming in here with a 60/40 split knowing the shit we’re in. That was why Accenture laid off a shitload of people in ’08, because ACN corporate told them to.

        for your nurse example, she may have sent $500, but her wealth was created elsewhere. whereas my mere $150 was created HERE. factor in the externalities of the situation. her 500 at best gets spent fully, but returns only taxes at about the same rate as my 150. i’m not even factoring in the inefficient tax collection, but the actual tax rates currently set. so my 500 gets taxed, 150. but my expenses also get taxed another 30%. in effect, when working in the country and spending mostly here, a person is effectively taxed somewhere around 50-60%. given we both started with $500, her 500, which is only taxed with sales tax, only contributes at most 30% of that. while my 500 gets taxed by income tax at 30% then further sales taxes at another 20-30%. so out of her 500, the state gets 150, while the state gets 200-300 from mine. and that’s not counting externalities of the wealth creation that happened with me in-country. her 500 did not create support jobs, but only drive spending. but my 500 also incidentally created support jobs, and their pay also got taxed. in a vacuum, yes her 500 does more. but counting externalities (nothing in an economy exists in a vacuum), my 500 does more.

      • BongV says:

        precisely my point – the EPZA zones show the poer of the free market – why limit the removal of the equity restrictions to the EPZA only? that’s not fair. why punish the rest of the philippines in favor of the EPZA when the equity restricitons can be removed for the ENTIRE philippines – not just the EPZA .

        you might be surprised to see what the incorporation papers say 🙂

        ***

        DOMESTIC SUBSIDIARY

        A subsidiary is a corporation which, while incorporated and existing under Philippines laws, is either wholly-owned or at least majority owned by a foreign “parent” corporation. It is therefore a domestic (Philippine) corporation but is considered foreign in that it is owned by a foreign corporation. The advantage of a subsidiary over a branch office is that a subsidiary has a separate and distinct juridical personality from its parent corporation, so that the liability of the parent corporation to creditors of the subsidiary is limited to its shareholdings in the domestic subsidiary. The parent foreign corporation is thus fully protected from the liabilities of the subsidiary in excess of its shareholdings in such subsidiary. Nationality requirements with respect to certain industries must be observed.

        Capital Requirement

        The required minimum paid-up capital is Two Hundred Thousand US Dollars (US$200,000.00). (Republic Act No. 8179). This amount of required minimum paid-up capital may be reduced to One Hundred Thousand US Dollars (US$100,000.00) if advanced technology as determined by the Philippine Department of Science and Technology is involved or the business directly employs at least fifty (50) employees. The minimum paid up capital of US$200,000.00 does not apply to enterprises that export sixty percent (60%) or more of its output or domestic purchases.

        Taxes

        A subsidiary is also liable for tax at the same rate of 35% on its entire net income, both from sources within and without the Philippines, or the MCIT, whichever is higher (see discussion on “Branch”). The remittance of dividends by a subsidiary to its foreign “parent” corporation is, generally, taxed at 35%. This, however, may be reduced to 15% where the country in which the foreign “parent” corporation either: (a) grants a tax sparing credit or (b) does not at all impose any tax on such dividends received.

        Likewise, the ‘educed rate of 15% is applied when the laws of the country of domicile of the foreign “parent” corporation does not tax at all any dividends received (Commissioner of Internal Revenue v. Wander Philippines, Inc., 160 SCRA 573). Some of these countries include Hong Kong, Bermude and the Cayman Islands (BIR Rulings Nos. 126-83, dated 8 July 1983; 45-85, dated 22 March 1985; 17985, dated 9 October 1985, 208-89 dated September 28, 1989; and 111-88 dated March 11, 1988).

        Expenses

        The parent company of a subsidiary cannot pass on to its subsidiary any portion of such expenses since the subsidiary is a separate and distinct entity.

        Liabilities

        The subsidiary’s liabilities are separate and do not become the liabilities of its foreign “parent” corporation because of its separate juridical personality. Recovery for damages and/or liabilities is limited to the capital and assets of the subsidiary in the Philippines. The foreign corporation is thus completely shielded from the liabilities of its subsidiary.

        Deposit of Securities

        No deposit of securities with any entity is required.

        *Establishment and Registration Costs

        a. Filing fee is 1/5 of 1% of the authorized capital stock or the subscription price of the subscribed capital stock whichever is higher but not less than P1,000.00

        b. Legal research fee of 1% of the filing fee;

        c. By-Laws fee of P510.00; Stock transfer book P470.00

        d. Documentary stamp tax for the issuance of shares equivalent to P2.00 for every P200.00 par value of shares issued; and

        e. Minimal amount of fees for post incorporation government permits such as the mayor’s permit, tax identification number, Value Added Tax and Withholding Tax Agent’s Registration if applicable, BIR registration of books of account and Certificate of Registration with the Bureau of Domestic Trade.

        ***

        The capital requirements are NON-TARIFF BARRIERS that restrict investments.

        *****.

        even if her wealth is created elsewhere – the nurse buys residential property and commercial property ith cold hard investments – on top of her remittances – that’s putting wealth INTO instead of extracting OUT – so she is actually creating jobs – and paying taxes that match your payroll taxes – that’s more than you produce. not to mention the multiplier effect of her purchase on the hardware stores, the home appliance store, the furniture store, the employment of maids, bodyguards, janitors, – all of which make purchases that allow YOU to benefit from the nurse’ fund infusion – that’s velocity many times over. NURSE has more infusions than you.

  23. ChinoF says:

    “If you are going to help this country, you’ve got to be in the country… If any of you have ambitions of going abroad… you are essentially betraying the people in the Philippines…”
    = myth, myth, myth, myth, myth, myth, myth, myth, myth, myth, myth, myth, myth, myth… even for the UP students.
    Disabuse yourselves of the myth and Get Real.

  24. inflame says:

    bongV, i ALSO buy whatever your nurse is buying. it’s not like im not spending investing the 500USD/20kPHP that I have here. it’s not like im not able to invest here while she is. initially we were talking about a 500USD input, now you’re adding that the nurse is adding investment/property purchases also. what’s going to stop me from doing the same? she may be starting it with up front capital, but i can get the same capital by borrowing from financial institutions. what your nurse can do, i can do also.

    that is also why i don’t disagree with you bongV, regarding removing the restrictions. it does drive more investment. but who would invest if you do not have the talent? who’s going to build a factory here when there’s no more engineers to design things and run the machinery to produce stuff? people leaving, also means LOSING TALENT in this country. we need talent/human resources to actually run factories. if all the people become nurses and leave and just remit, no one is going to invest because they don’t have the talent here. thus we need our engineers and scientist to STAY HERE so that someone will invest here and hire us.

    as it stands now, most of the IT industry needs more talent to hire. the US corps WANT to hire us because we’re equal, if not better, than india or china. what’s stopping them is that there’s no one to hire because everyone is leaving to become a nurse somewhere.

    ChinoF, also the myth that getting out and remitting is the best way to earn money and help the economy is also a myth. please disabuse yourself of that too, and Get Real. wealth creation drives a healthy economy, not consumerism. we need more engineers and scientist HERE to create wealth, not more nurses.

    • BongV says:

      i am not questioning that YOU are buying – am saying the buying power of the NURSE remittance (x% of her gross income) is bigger – what’s going to stop you from doing the same? disposal income – that’s what. yes you can get one yourself – but again its a question of absolute magnitude.

      the IT industry can benefit from liberalization. if foreign investors are allowed to own majority shares of IT schools – you can get more people certified in IT – thereby increasing employment. for now – you’ll have to deal with the equity caps. why wait for charter change when they can just take their money to china and roll it out in 90 days tops.

      segments of china are transitioning into high value added services – to include IT outsourcing – if the Philippines can’t provide the talent – investors will shop else where. – http://www.outsourcing.com/china_trends/pdf/IT_Outsourcing_China.pdf

    • ChinoF says:

      If we want to take something good from Monsod… what was quoted here is not one of them. This is not one of her better moments. We should look for something else.

      I agree though with what you said on wealth creation… BongV is already engaging you on that score.

      • ChinoF says:

        Neither did I say that getting out and remitting is the best way to earn money. If some see that as the best way for their case, It’s cruel to block them.

  25. jemon says:

    jejeje.. Is this serious?

    Why only students of UP? Of course, SHE IS TALKING TO STUDENTS OF UP!

    Perhaps, mr. benign is working abroad? Ouch.. you see some truth hurts.. jejeje…

    • killem says:

      hehehe, i concur

      just wondering, if all those able and competent people leave RP for ” more money”.. who will be left to educate the next generation? and who will be left to fight for reforms and the improvement of our country?

      so maybe the there are some truth beyond what many called as “myth”.

      • jemon says:

        Of course Mr. benign won’t answer that if he is one of those who are comfortably living abroad and won’t come back to make things right here. Ouchie..ouchie.. jejeje

  26. ChinoF says:

    Thanks, Boombox… here’s a response to Dr. Winnie from someone named Dr. Joy Marcaida, M.D.

    No Winnie, Filipinos who go overseas are not traitors

    • jemon says:

      Actually, Ms. Monsod did not say Filipinos who went overseas are traitors, not even a hint of that. Perhaps you might first want to view the youtube video. jeje..

  27. killem says:

    for people guidance, the 60/40% is required only on business imbued with public interest or those nationalized industry, those other industry can be 100% wholly owned by foreigners..

  28. The lecture is for UP students and UP alumni and not for the “others”
    that is why she only addressed this to his class in UP. So for those who are asking why? You answer this, “taga UP ka ba?”

    • BongV says:

      Up is paid for by taxpayers. that answer alone is good enough reason for taxpayers to stop supporting UP – and demand a reduction in taxes so they can have that money in their wallets and send their children to better schools than wasting it in a school that teaches flawed concepts.

  29. JUANDELACRUZ says:

    BAH, BONG V AT ILDA , TALAGANG MGA ELITISTA KAYO , NA MATAPOBRENG NANG-UURI NG TAO , KAYA GALIT NA GALIT KAYO SA UP AT KAY MARENG WINNIE. SABI KO NGA BA, KAYO TALAGA AY MGA TAKSIL AT TRAYDOR SA BAYAN AT SA BANSA NINYO, AT KASAMA KAYO SA MGA BURGIS NA MAY HALONG LAHING-PUTI ( O KAYA SIGURO GUSTONG-GUSTO NIYO NA MAGING DAYUHAN ) NA SALOT SA BUHAY NG MGA MASANG PILIPINO . KUNG AYAW NA AYAW NINYO DITO, PUWES UMALIS NA LANG KAYO NGAYON DIN, AT SUMAMA SA MGA BANYAGANG INIIDOLO NIYO, MGA KAPAL NA MUKHANG AROGANTENG SOBRANG MAPAGPAMATAAS SA KANILANG SARILI! SIGURADONG MAGUGUNAW MUNA ANG MUNDO BAGO KAYO MATUTONG MAPAGKUMBABA SA SARILI!

  30. Pingback: Winnie Monsod’s speech: Deference to elders is getting us nowhere

  31. BOY BARUROT says:

    Yung sinasabi ni Winnie ay para sa mga taga UP lamang. Wala kang karapatan at wala kang paki kung di ka taga UP. Nakikinig ka lang.

    Parang sa religion lang yan, anung paki mo kung ang mga muslim nag raramadan? The same kay Monsod, anung paki niyo kung yung sinabi niya.

    INB4: “Ako taga UP ako blabla etc.” kung may sasabihin ka, sabiihin mo sa harap ni Monsod.

  32. tiki says:

    Go where? The other countries are falling apart because all that wealth turns out to be debt.

  33. potaters says:

    I posted the lecture on my FB wall because I thought it was inspiring. There were some inspiring words, I particularly liked that quote she mentioned (“I am only one, but I am one…. etc.”). But I do get what you’re saying, Benigno. That this isn’t enough. That maybe she is “barking up the wrong tree” as one commenter said in another post. Lord knows that it’s different when you’re supporting a family, or if you’re paying for tuition fees of your siblings… even if you want to work here and you know, “be the change”, it’s so difficult. Not only financially but even co-existing with some people here makes me want to blow my brains out.

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