South Korea: the country that the Philippines could have been

The Republic of Korea or South Korea or simply Korea has been on Filipinos’s minds lately. From the trivial to the more serious, Filipinos have somehow taken offense from what both a Korean citizen and the Korean government have done to some Filipinos. Unfortunately, most Filipinos in general think that Korea owe us some kind of apology for being offended by something that ordinary Koreans most likely perceive to be merely a joke and, in the case of the South Korean government, an exercise of their sovereign right.

The initial uproar started when a video clip of Korean actress Lee Da Hae surfaced on YouTube and not surprisingly, came to the attention of Filipino crybabies. According to sources from the Net, the clip was from the now defunct KBS2TV variety show, “Sweet Night” and it showed in less than 5 minutes actress Hae being asked to mimic how other nationalities talk in English. Her demonstration of the way Filipinos spoke didn’t go down well with Filipinos who thought she was being “insulting”.

It’s a bit sad that we Filipinos don’t even know how to take things in stride anymore. For a Christian nation, we take offense at the slightest remark in reference to us as if we were the Kings of the world — as if anyone who makes fun of us deserve to have his or her head cut off. For a people who claim to be “happy” despite their hardship, we lack an ability to laugh at ourselves.

Where did our sense of humor go? Did we even have one? Or do we see it as only “we” having the right to poke fun at others? I’d say that’s a fair call judging from all the Filipino skits that make fun of other nationalities. It seems that we cannot take any kind of criticism even in jest whether it’s coming from a Desperate Housewives script, the quips of celebrities like Alec Baldwin, or the gags of modern-day philosophers like Adam Carolla. I know this subject has been discussed ad nauseum but it is still important that we keep pointing these things out because most Filipinos simply just don’t get it.

I don’t recall Kazakhstan asking for an apology from Sacha Baron Cohen (Borat) when he dedicated an entire film to depicting a caricature of its people. Suffice to say Cohen’s depiction of Kazakhstan’s citizens wasn’t very flattering. I can’t seem to reconcile the outrage over something trivial done during a comedy skit on one hand while on the other lies the fact of a Presidential aide, insulting the Vietnamese people during an official state function — something the Vietnamese in turn, did not demand an apology for.

There is definitely something wrong with our society, in particular, how we prefer that the world see us. We are somehow desperate to be always seen in a positive light; unfortunately, we just come across as prideful and worse, pathetic losers when we make much ado about nothing. We should be willing to look inwards and engage in self-reflection from time to time. Other nationalities are not always out to get us. We should think about the possibility that there might be some truth to what they are saying.

The other more serious issue that had made it to the headlines is the deportation of six Filipinos after being barred from entering South Korea because they are on the blacklist of the government.

As expected, they and some of their supporters were very disappointed about being deported considering that, supposedly, “the six were supposed to participate in planned demonstrations and attend a ‘people’s summit’ organized by the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions as a parallel meeting of NGOs and civil society organizations coinciding with the G-20 summit“; that is, according to the statement of the Kilusang Mayo Uno (KMU) in which one of the six Filipinos is a member of.

The six deportees were hoping that President Noynoy Aquino (P-Noy) would somehow intervene on their behalf. They were also demanding that the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) file a formal diplomatic protest against the Republic of Korea because they were given “shabby treatment” and allegedly dragged back on board a flight back to Manila. It is easy enough to conclude that, if they had to be dragged, it could only mean that they refused to cooperate in the first place. Why should the Philippine Government intervene in something they were not even a part of? It’s not like they were sent there on an official affair of state.

While the six Filipinos were claiming to have been planning on holding a demonstration on behalf of the exploited and oppressed during the G-20 summit, one cannot blame the South Korean government for giving them the boot because if you go by the history of the G-20 summit, “peaceful demonstrations” always exhibited a potential to get really nasty. One just has to remember what happened in Canada the last time the summit was held there when according to some reports “several police cars were burnt and several establishments were vandalized, leading to the arrest of over 1,000 protesters.”

The thing that most Filipinos who were outraged by the deportation don’t realize is that, if you plan on demonstrating against something on someone else’s soil, you should not expect the red carpet treatment. Just count yourself lucky if they even allow you in. If not, just move along. These six Filipino professional demonstrators deported from South Korea just need to accept that sometimes you win some, other times you lose some.

All this recent fuss about South Korea — or Korea to some — gives me the impression that the presence of now over 100,000 Koreans living in the Philippines is breeding resentment among Filipinos. The existence of Koreans could only be a positive thing if Filipinos are not totally averse to learning from outsiders.

The Republic of Korea: A story with a happy ending

South Koreans have not always been frequent travelers. When they were still under authoritarianism, ordinary Koreans were not allowed to leave their country. And because of the nuclear threat from the North and having gone through the brutal occupation of the Japanese during World War II, they became very suspicious of foreigners. There was even an incident in the past when locals beat up a US military officer while he was on the train because they mistook him for someone who was harassing a Korean woman. It turned out the woman was his wife. Until now, they still cannot come to terms with the way they were treated by the Japanese while they occupied their country, so the resentment against Japan is still strong. It’s been said that the dislike for anything Japanese is like an unofficial state religion. Koreans even blame the bad weather on Japan on any ordinary day.

The Philippines’ political history has a lot in common with Korea’s. For one, both countries have a Presidential system; two, similar to Korea, the Philippines was under a dictatorship for decades. From 1972 the Philippines was under the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos’s regime until he was toppled and exiled in 1986 while Korea was under Military dictatorship since the 1950s until they switched to more democratic governance in the 1980s. Third, Korea’s political system even after switching to democracy always got bad international press as late as the 1990s because it was riddled with corruption and nepotism which is something that the Philippines is unfortunately still experiencing until now.

The situation with the Koreans in the 1990s was so similar to what is happening to Filipinos now that if you read the following excerpt from the book Asian Values, Western Dreams by Greg Sheridan, you will not be able to ignore the striking resemblance of the Korean political setting to our current political setting, to wit:

“In an earlier conversation in 1996 Kim Dae Jung had gone so far as to call into question South Korea’s basic democratic credentials. “I don’t believe Korea is a democracy,” he said at that time. “President Kim Young-Sam has failed to implement democracy. During the election in 1995 the ruling party committed every type of election fraud, spending money everywhere and exploiting the activities of North Korea in the Demilitarized Zone. Television is totally under the control of the State.”

To be sure, Philippine elections in the past and even the recent one in May 2010 were mired by allegations of fraud in the form of vote buying and rigging of election results, the latter not prevented even by new electronic voting systems. Likewise, mainstream media in the Philippines which includes a major television network and a leading newspaper is owned by oligarchs who are also friends and relatives of the incumbent President, Noynoy Aquino. In short, the powerful elite who exert a strong influence on the electorate controls the media.

There is something else that I recently realized that we have in common with the Koreans. Because our countries were both under the influence of mind control for decades under an authoritarian regime, Filipinos tend to treat their political leaders like they are Kings, which was how the Koreans even years after they have switched to democracy also treated theirs.

In other words, it took a while for them to shake off the idea of full submission to a single authority figure. This might explain why Filipinos still think that their duty as a citizen ends after voting during the election. The likely drawback in having this mentality is that voters get too emotionally attached to the individual (and their next of kin) and elect them because they are popular but not necessarily because they are competent enough for public office.

Korea, however, has the advantage of possessing a Confucian culture. In Confucianism, the leader or ruler should embody those virtues the society holds dear. While they put their leader on a pedestal, there is also a “Confucian and Buddhist notion that the ruler should govern in the interests of the people, and the Buddhist emphasis on the worth of every human being” which was why every leader who became embroiled in corruption in Korea always paid for their crime.

This was evident in how every single Korean President since Korea became a democracy retired in disgrace. “They either went into exile; were assassinated or went to jail.” Now that is something we as a society should truly admire and emulate. Sadly, impunity still prevails in Philippine society even after the late dictator Marcos was deposed, which is also why our leaders could get away with practically anything for years and still get reelected. This can be attributed to the fact that there was a power vacuum after Marcos left because the one who replaced him, the late former President Cory Aquino, though widely beloved was also considered a weak leader who did not introduce any economic reforms. Her 1987 constitution is even blamed by its critics for stifling the economy.

It wasn’t until former Korean President and pro-democracy advocate Kim Young-Sam was elected in 1993 that the Korean political system started cleaning-up. Although he was also indirectly embroiled in controversy towards the end of his term (due to his close association with the jailed former President and his brother being jailed), he was instrumental in shaping the political system of the country. The next President Kim Dae-jung elected in 1998 who was also a Harvard classmate of the late Philippine Senator Benigno Aquino, continued the effort to build a prosperous Korea.

Despite the turmoil in the political scene, strong institutions backed by an ancient Confucian culture provided a check and balance that eventually resulted in a stable Korean economy. The sense of nationalism in Korea is unmatched even by the Japanese. Part of this strong sense of nationalism has a lot to do with the draconian laws and decrees introduced during the period when they were still under dictatorship. To quote an excerpt from an article written by the late Teddy Benigno:

In the 1950s former General Park Chung-hee set-up a dictatorship which first decreed land reform. He then got the leading capitalists, entrepreneurs, economists; policy planners together win to something like a ruling national council. He drove them to excel, meet or exceed targets. Or else. The story goes that a prominent businessman complained, said he couldn’t meet his target. Park Chung-hee simply replied he would be executed at dawn. The businessman relented and met his target.

That was iron discipline. But it was that discipline that forged the new South Korea and today it is the 12th biggest economy in the world.

It is obvious that authoritarian rule has done more good than harm for the Korean people overall. It instilled discipline and a strong sense of nationalism in its people.

Korea has certainly come a long way. And their coming of age was remarkably fast. Three decades ago, Korea was even poorer than Malaysia and Mexico. Now, its “GDP per capita has surged by a factor of 10 to $17,000.00 more than double the levels in those countries. GDP growth was 0.2% in much of the rest of the world was contracting, and is estimated to be 6% this year” according to figures obtained from TIME magazine.

What was Korea’s secret then? The average Korean is ambitious and works furiously hard and long hours. There is even a saying that “Korea is the one society in the world in which the Chinese go broke and the Japanese look lazy”. They instill this discipline to the younger generation. The average Korean child goes to a coaching school three times a week and it is standard for them to learn English because they recognize the importance of being proficient in the English language.

The hardworking mentality is obviously another legacy of being ruled under an iron fist for several decades. Second to being hardworking, after decades of fearing their neighbor, Koreans worked on their national psyche and embraced globalization. They recognized that they needed to adjust their attitude towards race, the concept of citizenship based on blood, the underlying fear and intolerance of outsiders because “it was the greatest single weakness in their culture” according to Greg Sheridan.

In recent years, it is not unusual for children to go overseas to acquire a Western education and apply what they have learned to their homeland. You could say that Koreans are not averse to learning from outsiders. This also promoted innovation in their society. Whereas in the past, there were only a handful of companies that people could work for, nowadays there are more and more foreign investors playing a much larger role in the domestic economy, which increases competition. The influx of foreign money, ideas and people make a vibrant Korea.

The Asian financial crisis during the late 1990s and having to be bailed out by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), served as a catalyst for change and accepting that the old ways didn’t work. From being a hermit kingdom to embracing globalization in the 1960s, they mobilized their cheap labor to competitively export cheap and low-tech goods to consumers in the west, which jump-started their income growth. There is no turning back for Korea.

Korea is now a force to be reckoned with. South Korea is the first Asian country to host the G-20 summit this November. From being insular to a major player in the world market, Korea is a country that the Philippines could have been.

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185 Responses to South Korea: the country that the Philippines could have been

  1. Rick says:

    AMEN! Btw, you have a typo. You said Seoul is the first asian *country*….

    Anyway, your article is really great. I appreciate it!

    • ilda says:

      Thanks for telling me! I fixed it! I was so excited to post it, didn’t have much time to re-read twice 🙂

      • Miriam Quiamco says:

        Iida, I think the South Korean form of government is fundamentally different from our presidential system of government, they have a unicameral legislature which churns our policies quite more efficiently than our bicameral legislative body.  Plus, their representatives are chosen from single-member constituencies, making these elected politicians accountable to the voters in their local electoral districts.  They don’t have an upper house similar to our senate which simply wastes resources in government.

      • Miriam Quiamco says:

        correction:  churn out, not churn our

      • ulong pare says:

        sokor’s management are committed to economies, efficiencies and productivity improvements, while Filipinos are more attuned to Congressman Pacquiao, Charice P, etc…

      • ilda says:

        Hi Miriam

        Regardless of the set-up, maybe the difference lies more on the fact that our representatives and Senators are not as competent, have vested interest elsewhere and our constituents are not as intelligent as theirs so they do not demand much from their representatives. Whatever the set-up, our public officials should all be accountable to the voters and the taxpayers.

        Correct me if I’m wrong but our form of government is the same with that of the US but their check and balance seems to work. It boils down to our culture of impunity again and apathy even from our public officials.

    • Orion says:

      Hey Ilda,

      You might  also want to mention that “AP Stalwart” Orion also made fun of Filipinos, certain stereotypes about Filipinos, and the Filipino accent and then point to this piece of incriminating evidence: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXYxYgxI81o

      Of course, fun was also made of the British, American, Australian, Singaporean, and Indian accents…

      Why did the audience (which had representatives from all those nationalities in attendance) not throw tomatoes at me? 

      • ilda says:

        Orion

        I didn’t know celebrity ka pala! lol 😉

        Oo nga naman. Your audience was a mix breed and they didn’t mind you making fun of the accents. They sure had a sense of humour.

        The reaction of most Filipino crybabies to jokes made by other nationalities in reference to us is so embarrassing already.

  2. benign0 says:

    Quite simply:

    – 😀

    • EthanRei says:

      Haha, if I got the message correctly, I’ve always thought too that the jeepney actually represents everything that’s wrong with our country.

    • Homer says:

      lol…the illustration above reminds me of a localized Monty Python intro. it would also make a good billboard along our main roads, visible to the eyes of snarling jeepney advocates.

  3. BongV says:

    Given culture as a constant, you can’t do much under flawed institutions and flawed economic polices.

    The North Koreans are as hard working as the South Koreans BUT are they are a prosperous society?

    • Orion says:

      Yo BongV,

      In fact, during the Japanese Occupation of the entire Korean Peninsula, the northern part of Korea (which became North Korea) was actually the more prosperous and more industrialized one, while the southern part (which became South Korea) was the poorer, agricultural, rural, and less industrialized area. Culturally, the northern part  was more “industrious” than the southern part.

      But after the Korean War and the partition into North and South Korea happened, with the North using a Marxist-Stalinist Communist Centrally-Planned Economic System, while the South used a Capitalist Market Economy, in the end, South Korea became the much more industrialized and more prosperous of the two. 

      In this situation, the culture was skewed slightly  to the North, but the economic system, the institutions, and yes, the economic policies were all flawed.

      South Korea, on the other hand, had better (and more logically-correct) economic policies and in fact when Park Chung Hee became the leader of South Korea, his dynamic quality of leadership helped unite South Korea behind pro-progress policies of rapid industrialization.

      The North Korea – South Korea difference very clearly illustrates the whole  CETERIS PARIBUS  concept of:

      “same culture, different systems —> different results.”

      Once  again, North Korea started off having people who were actually much more hardworking and more educated than the people from South Korea, but all because of the South’s use of the right economic system, the quality of leadership, the adoption of the right policies, and difference in institutions, South Korea is so much more progressive and prosperous. Nighttime Satellite photos reveal so much illumination in South Korea and  almost total darkness in North Korea.

      East versus West Germany was yet another example of “culture kept constant, difference in system —> difference in results.”

      Clearly, the concept of  CETERIS PARIBUS is the key to understanding all of this. 🙂

      • ulong pare says:

        to break it down to its elemental form, left-behind flips remain lawless gung gongs; while ‘bakwet flips to ‘merka are law-abiding gung gongs…

      • Lorenz says:

        i have watched many documentaries of people who have traveled to North Korea especially the famous “Don’t Tell My Mom”. North Koreans are indeed very hard working but they are “brain washed” and exploited to the max by their stupid government who doesn’t care about their people at all. They are Ill educated and malnourished.

        They claim to be nationalistic/patriotic but in truth their govt doesn’t even care about their citizens but only their pride and lust for power.

        They were never a communist. No country was able to truly utilize/adopt communism as envisioned by Karl Marx. Not even the Soviet Union.

        I am mostly shocked that kids are being taught by their mothers a song about killing Americans. All the books available to the people have been doctored/changed in an idealistic way for their government’s propaganda. *facepalm*

      • Aegis-Judex says:

        “They claim to be nationalistic/patriotic but in truth their govt doesn’t even care about their citizens but only their pride and lust for power.”

        Does that remind you of anything? Oligarchs? The dumb fooks who voted for a dumb fook?

    • benign0 says:

      @ BongV: true, although the comparison between North and South Korea involves a comparison between extreme polar opposite systems and is not the same as comparing, say, the Marcosian tyranny of the 70’s and the “freedom” afforded by today’s governance in the Pinas.

      It’s like the difference between a comparison between Perez Hilton to Brad Pitt and a comparison between David Bowie and Brad Pitt on a gayness scale. The earlier is a clear contrast while the latter is more just a difference in degree (relative to the earlier).

      • BongV says:

        True, NK and SK are diametrically opposite today.

        In the past, there was only one Korea – presumably, same culture and traditions – at that point prior to the split. And in this same point of reference – the Philippine was also in the same nascent, turbulent, nebuloid stage, as I previously blogged in the Tale of Two Countries – Philippines versus SK.

        Culture being constant.

        1. After the war, Philippines was next to Japan in economic might – and there was one Korea – still protectionist.

        2. Then Korea splits, Philippines stays the same – still protectionist.

        3. NK goes the way of the commie oligarchy.

        4. SK goes the way of the military oligarchy – still protectionist.

        5. The Philippines goes the way of the feudal oligarchy – the military oligarchy – still protectionist.

        6. Philippines and SK adopt import substitution – still protectionist. NK goes into juche self-reliance.

        7. Philippines and SK emerge from martial law – still protectionist. NK continues its juche policy.

        8. Philippines returns to feudal oligarchy – still protectionist. SK embraces the free market.NK continues its juche policy.

        9. SK goes the way of the free market. Philippines is – still protectionist.

        If Philippines was no 2 in 1950 – could it be said then that the culture at that time was different from today’s culture?

        The current AS-IS state

      • Lorenz says:

        i don’t think the culture in that time was very different from now. What caused it to change if it were the case? there should be a reason. i guess Philippines was no 2 in 1950s mostly because most countries were in deep conflict within the Cold War (Vietnam War, Korean War, divided Germany, Chinese Civil War, Communist insurgencies, etc.) What else is that most Asian countries were still recovering from WWII.

        The Philippine communists were not that strong in 1950s anymore too.

      • ilda says:

        For me it is obvious that in the 1950s, our success then can be attributed to the fact that we were still benefiting from a lot of American infrastructure the Americans left behind. The problem is, we didn’t improve on some of the things they left behind. The jeepney is a classic example of this. In a sense, we were more open to adopting foreign innovation then than now. For some reason, we seem to be averse to the outside influence now. We have so many of our elites studying abroad but they don’t seem to bring their knowledge back home so we can use it for the advancement of our country.

      • benign0 says:

        @ BongV re: “If Philippines was no 2 in 1950 – could it be said then that the culture at that time was different from today’s culture? […] The current AS-IS state”

        One could argue that we were number two then because we were fresh out of 50 years of U.S. rule, and perhaps money was flowing in and jobs abounded because of the repair work being done in the aftermath of WWII bombing. If Japan was No. 1 at the time, it was because it was number one in Asia since the 19th Century and specially after it established itself as a major military power after it emerged victorious from the Russo-Japanese war at the turn of the century.

        Compare the Philippines and Japan (No 2 and No 1 respectively in the 1950s). The Philippines was so under the management of a foreign power, whilst the Japanese were so under its own management and conscious initiative.

        So in a sense, it is not surprising that the Philippines began its decline after it became independent (in the REAL sense) after 1946 — it was merely reverting back to its natural state (since it was no longer propped up by a foreign master that was counteracting this natural tendency) — seeking its own level, kung baga — back to the state in which the Spanish first found us back in the 16th Century. The only problem was we were regressing back to our natural state while our population size was galloping towards the monstrous levels we see today. Back to primitivism but NOT back to a natural population level that fits our labour-intensive low-capital-applied primitivist way of life.

        Japan on the other hand, after its defeat in WWII, merely continued what it was doing since its modernisation drive in the 19th Century. It was a sustainable momentum because it was a collective initiative fuelled from the very fabric of its “cultural DNA”.

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    • ilda says:

      @Bong

      North Korea hasn’t fully opened up their economy and embraced globalization yet. Innovation is not encouraged, so there are no small businesses. The state controls all major sectors of the economy and formulates all decisions about the use of resources and the distribution of output. You know all the rest…

      Yeah, they work hard to build and amass nuclear weapons.

      • palahubug99 says:

        So, in short, if NK were to somehow magically overthrow the Kim cult worship and adapt free-market capitalism tomorrow, in 10 years we can expect na malalampasan na rin ang ekonomiya ng Pilipinas by NK?

      • ilda says:

        Well they are already a hardworking lot, they just need to embrace globalization. palahubug

  4. elphalba says:

    To my knowledge I don’t recall Kazakhstan demanding an apology from Cohen, etc. regarding the movie either, but the village where they filmed the hometown scenes did. They even filed a lawsuit against the filmmakers.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1078446/We-hate-Borat-The-poor-Romanian-villagers-humiliated-Sacha-Baron-Cohens-spoof-documentary.htmlI was trying to find out what happened to the lawsuit, but no such luck, only found out more lawsuits were filed against that movie according to its imdb page.Just an FYI lang. Not a correction since Cohen, etc filmed in the Romanian village under false pretenses in the first place.
    I do agree all this brouhaha over Pinoy jokes is so trivial though. We really have lost our sense of humor if we don’t get it’s a joke, it’s intended to make people laugh. Sure it may be an ethnic joke, which precisely what an ethnic joke is — it makes fun of other people and their culture –but the bottom line is it is still a joke. Who are we actually kidding over all these apologies? An apology may be issued but we still stay the same unimproved balat-sibuyas lot.

    • ilda says:

      Thanks for the info elphalba I have a feeling that lawsuit you were referring to was just a publicity stunt to generate more interest in the film. And it wasn’t even the people of Kazakhstan demanding an apology.

      Glad to know we share the same point of view 🙂

  5. EthanRei says:

    I actually found that Korean clip about Filipino accent funny. Not hilarious, but I chuckled a bit. I wondered why everyone started posting it and getting upset. Is is because she didn’t exactly get our accent right? Anyway, we’re losing our sense of humor when it’s all we got.

    I have some questions. I like what I read here, and you guys make sense. It’s true what you say about ourselves (I’m including you ok?) and therefore our country. It’s a slap in the face — a lot of slaps actually that I’m getting dizzy and I sometimes get too weak to react or act. The facts about us Pinoys that you raise are things some of us have noticed too. But you guys put them into words very succinctly and “acidically” (maasim? hehe). Ok, my question is, with all the “solutions”, suggestions and observations that are being brought up here, how are we supposed to act on it and make it real or make it stop? Talking about them is one thing. At least they’re rising to the surface. Then what? Discuss amongst ourselves which of them is true or not, which solution is best? How will they be heard more clearly and made doable by many? Is there a way I (as a small, lowly, positive-thinking citizen) can help? I’m sure shouting in the streets is not one of them, we’ve been there.

    We all have solutions, but they’re only implemented as intellectual discussions. I think part of the solution/s is convincing those who are already in power, to accept those solutions. Then when everything’s in place, give them the boot (as if they’d leave).

    I hope I’m not sounding sarcastic. I’m just merely frustrated, I’ve always had dreams that we’ll get better any moment now. But it seems that that’s never going to happen anymore. I don’t want to leave this country yet. I still do my job as honestly as I can, believing that it’ll make a difference. Hehe, corny no?

    • ChinoF says:

      Lee Da Hae’s skit was supposed to be funny. You got the joke. Looks like a lot didn’t. 😛 

      Action I guess could start with ourselves and teaching what we know to those around us. To tell your family to stop watching Wowowee or Willing Willie and other stuff like that, tell other people what you think about the Lee Da Hae issue, and other stuff. So far, that’s what I can do. Although I sometime go on radio in the Sentro ng Katotohanan program. Carmen Pedrosa is trying to set up community radio to reach the masses. 

      • Lorenz says:

        I read in a Yahoo news that Lee Da Hae didn’t actually meant that Filipinos speak like that but she actually referred to the SouthEast Asians. I would say, she is more referring to Indonesians, Malaysians, etc. (i have heard their accents in Nat Geo and Crime&Investigation Channels).

      • ChinoF says:

        Then why did Filipinos get riled out of all the “Southeast Asians?” Funny, isn’t it? 

      • Lorenz says:

        Insecurity. Don’t you get it? Filipinos feel inferior to foreigners so they get angry when they are being joked. They get sensitive when being criticized by foreigners. It’s that simple really.

    • ulong pare says:

      @ethanrei… that’s a convoluted post… focus on a single item… are you educated or something?

    • ilda says:

      @EthanRei

      Sorry I forgot ro reply to you.

      The idea is to enlighten as many Filipinos as possible. We will only make a difference if the number of Filipinos who start using their critical analysis start growing. If you notice, the politicians get affected somehow when there is a public uproar. Take the case of the Mai Mislang issue. Because of the public outcry, P-Noy was forced to leave her behind when he went to the APEC summit in Japan. He may not have fired her, but you can tell that the pressure the bloggers and some journalists put on the administration through writing had a little bit of effect. So even if they tried to show that they were not affected, napapaisip sila kahit papaano.

      Now, you can help by spreading the word. The more people you convince about the truth, the better for our society. Then one day, the Philippine society will finally reach the age of Enlightenment. It would be faster if we can convince someone who is really influential. Maybe if you have a classmate who is well connected and you bombard him with links to our site, he can also spread the word. Once someone is exposed to the truth, there is no turning back. It’s a slow process but we have to keep doing it. Don’t get frustrated. Maybe your grandchildren will enjoy a more prosperous Philippines one day. 😉

    • Jay says:

      When time comes, when you can help make a difference, you gotta fight for it. I think AP continues to reinforce it so when it does come time to help change laws, or when someone in the government has the capability to create a wave with the assistance of voices, you gotta do your part.

      I mean FOIA didn’t get passed. Good luck with the restrictionist act for now, but both would be integral to change the Filipino society and how they look at politics and the economy. I mean if it was really power to the people, why don’t they pass those laws that clearly DEFINE power in their hands?. Information is power tool, not just something we discuss amongst intelligent people. Hell, a bachelors degree already proves that over any high school grad themselves, unless their families are filthy rich.

      But like any changes, it is going to be gradual. It is going to be an uphill battle. I know especially since I’ve been trying to lose weight and as much (or lack of) effort it took for me to gain 20-30 lbs., you certainly need to exert twice more and work harder to get rid of it. And inevitably, a permanent change in lifestyle.

      Even in my work, sometimes thinking about the goal, or the final result can be tedious. So focus on the little details.

  6. ChinoF says:

    I’d still think: we see South Korea and Singapore as “authoritarian.” Well, seeing it from our western-influenced eyes (or media-influenced eyes?) it looks that way. But was it really authoritarian, or democracy in another fashion? They controlled stuff indeed, like TV content. But did their own people see it as authoritarian just as our own people saw the Marcos government? Did the Korean gov’t then “salvage” political enemies? Somehow, I still feel that “authoritarian” in Philippines terms means, you get jailed when you do a crime, but when “democratic,” it means you can make “pakiusap” and avoid a jail term. Not so in South Korea. 

    I’d say culture and the right system are both factors in South Korea’s success. In the Philippines, we have a lousy culture and lousy system… both pull our country down. Double trouble. 

    • ilda says:

      Chino said:

      I’d say culture and the right system are both factors in South Korea’s success. In the Philippines, we have a lousy culture and lousy system… both pull our country down. Double trouble.

      Ilda said:

      Right. We need to continually re-examine what we are doing wrong. Even individuals need to reassess their actions from time to time. It should be the same for the whole society whether it’s our cultural or economic activities, we need to review it and change what needs to be changed. We need to adapt to the changing times or else we will be forever Asia’s laggard. We seem to be incapable of accepting our own shortfalls and think that we are just victims of circumstances.

      We find all kinds of excuses for our problems now like our colonial history, being under dictatorship and etc, etc. What we need to do is to move on. Nowadays we like blaming everything on the public officials. Who put them there anyway? The people did. Even P-Noy is blaming everything on GMA for his own shortfalls. Gimme a break!

  7. Pingback: SoKor and Pinas accdg to Anti-Pinoy

  8. Hyden Toro says:

    Korea is a nation, still under the threat, by the North Korea. I have some Korean friends in school. I found out, they were good students. They excelled in Science, Math and technical subjects. They were as disciplined as my Japanese and Chinese classmates. Most don’t put “hot air” on you. And were willing to help you; they explained to you subjects, you cannot understand fully well. Most went back to their countries; when they graduated. Filipinos just cannot sense a good joke. Especially, if the joke is upon them. “Masyadong sensitive sila…’ The South Korean has all the right to kick anybody, out in their country who they believe are troublemakers…

    • Sharafa says:

      Exactly. When you have a neighbor like North Korea that constantly calls you a “puppet regime” and threaten to “reunite” the two Koreas by forces, then you can’t really blame them for wanting to deport a few troublemaking commies who are just  there to create anti-South Korean sentiments.

      • Hyden Toro says:

        North Korea has Nuclear Weapons. It has the ability to deliver its nuclear bombs, anywhere in Asia, including the Philippines. Pakistan and India have also Nuclear Weapons; with the ability to deliver their nuclear bombs, also, anywhere in Asia.Pakistan has a very serious Al Queda insurgency problem. Also, a serious conflict with India. The Philippines is in the receiving end , as the results of these conflicts. Can you see the seriousness of the Al Queda inspired insurgency in Mindanao?

  9. Homer says:

    By the end of the 60’s, we were still superior to SK. It’s sad that we went downhill from there…but when one realizes it was bound to happen due to our “ways”, it’s not surprising.

    Back then, we had the potential. Today, we suck…..period!

    • ilda says:

      @Homer

      The majority of the Filipino people lack discipline and are so into instant gratification. They want everything now for minimal effort. That’s why most succumbed to shortcuts and under the table transactions. They are totally averse to the idea of working hard for themselves or for their own country.

  10. ulong pare says:

    flips got it all, except >>> discipline… no guts, no glory… when the goings get rough, ‘bakwet to ‘merka… allah eh, di tapos ang problema…

  11. Lorenz says:

    There’s also a difference. South Koreans are nationalistic/patriotic people with open minds as for Filipinos, apathy and laziness abounds in all levels of their society with no genuine patriotism whatsoever.

    • ulong pare says:

      @lorenz… say something negative about santo gunggongressman fcukiao or criticize flip heavily accented country-clubbed english… and you’ll be bombarded with curses and be excommunicated by partIYOTic flips…

      • Lorenz says:

        That’s not nationalism/patriotism anyway. If you want to know what it truly means to become a genuine nationalist/patriot then look up to Jose Rizal. He loved the country so much even to the point that he criticizes his fellow countrymen through the article “The Indolence of Filipinos”. That’s because he wants his country to prosper and his people to be enlightened.

        Buying local products is being nationalistic? Ignorant fools. They don’t know a thing about nationalism/patriotism.

        Students don’t even bother to sing the national anthem when played in special events.

      • killem says:

        as far as i can remember,  rizal love both spain and the phil that time… he supported changes in the govt, but never wanted for phil independence. he is more like a fence sitter, in a time where a person should take sides.. for me its a not a good example of being nationalist…

      • Lorenz says:

        Just look it like this pare. When your mother scolds you, does it mean she hates you? No of course. It actually means she wants you to be corrected and become a great man because she loves you.

        When a fellow Filipino criticizes something about the Philippines, does it mean he’s not nationalistic and patriotic? No of course.

        But apparently, Filipinos have no idea about nationalism and patriotism.

    • ilda says:

      @Lorenz

      As I mentioned in the article, the draconian rules when Korea was still under dictatorship coupled with their Confucian culture instilled discipline and a strong sense of nationalism in their people. After they changed to democracy, it was still a bit of a struggle to achieve real freedom because their psyche was still stuck with authoritarian rule. They were lucky to have had good leaders eventually who were reformers and had visions for the future of their nation.

      Too much freedom can be a bad thing when you are still immature and have no sense of identity yet. You can liken it to a teenager inheriting a big chunk of cash and having the freedom to do whatever he wants to do with it. The problem is, most teenagers still don’t have a sense of responsibility so the teenager will most likely squander all his inheritance in one go.

      And this is precisely what happened to Filipinos after we got our freedom from the Marcos regime. We just squander the freedom we have because we don’t really know what to do with it. We feel trapped with our incompetent leaders not realizing that we have the freedom to vote for the right one during elections and kick out the wrong one by asking them to resign. The public officials are supposed to be working for us but we treat them like kings or celebrities who can do no wrong. Worse, we even reelect them. Just look at the Senate and Congress as proof of this.

      Sense of nationalism can come naturally too when people see that they get gratification for their labor. At the moment, the Filipino people feel so helpless because they do not see where their taxes and efforts are going. Ironically, they also do not expect much from the public officials they voted for because they have become apathetic to the whole situation.

      • Aegis-Judex says:

        How do we bring that ethos to the country, then? Consider how there are elements that object to anything that calls for discipline. Leftists, I’m looking at you.

      • bubi78 says:

        Discipline comes from the word disciple. You be the model to your friends, classmates, and neighbors; teach them the appropriate traits and values and present yourself as the model how these traits and values made a difference in your life. Draconian measures will not instill discipline, the people may toe the line but they do so out of fear. The key to instilling the ethos that you yearn for lies in our educational system… teaching can be a subversive activity in the sense that you subvert the cultural DNA and re-engineer it to fit the mold of the more successful models that exist today. It goes without saying that doing so would call for a total revamp of the system and, of course, the political will and the right leader must be in place to institute the much needed change.
        Aegis, keep your faith but keep it to yourself because institutionalized religion has been corrupted and has ceased to be the harbinger of hope and salvation that it purport to be.

      • ilda says:

        @bubi78

        While I don’t really advocate the exact type of draconian measure that was used by Korea in the 1950s, you have to admit that if it weren’t for it, they wouldn’t have achieved their economic prosperity in a short span of time. I mean, the results speak for itself.

        When you mention the word disciple, the late Cory Aquino comes to mind. To most Filipinos, she was the epitome of all things “good”. But did they follow her example though? The answer is no because each individual still has to battle his or her own demons and most Filipinos lose that battle. Even her own daughter, Kris Aquino could not emulate her because she has her own issues. Most Filipinos are too immature, irresponsible and not to mention selfish in using their freedom.

        Unfortunately, our own culture is our own enemy. Most Filipinos cater more to pakikisama even if they know they are doing the wrong thing but since they see that everyone else is doing it, they kid themselves by thinking that “it’s probably ok because, they are also doing it”. Most Filipinos care more about their image; popularity and reputation so they try to show-off by buying stuff they think can help make them look cool but otherwise don’t really need. Or worse, they don’t want to criticise their leaders because they might lose their friends by doing so.

        The authoritarian style I would advocate for Filipinos is akin to the style of the authority exercised by a parent to a child – which is stern but with love. Think about when you were a child, your parents had to instill fear in you so you will obey them. You feared being scolded or getting in trouble because you know there is a consequence when you disobeyed. Most kids feared being berated by their parents and would not want to disappoint them.

        The secret to the rules being obeyed whether it’s at home or in the community is the constant follow-through of consequences. We must punish people who disobey the rules by imposing penalties in the form of fines or jail. If we are too wishy-washy with implementing the laws in our society or if keep letting people get away with their crimes by bribery or pakikisama, Filipinos will be trapped in the cycle of mediocrity.

      • Lorenz says:

        I would say we should follow the educational system of Japan or Australia and not the United States.

      • ilda says:

        @Aegis-Judex

        We must get rid of our culture of impunity otherwise; the cycle of mediocrity will prevail. There should always be a consequence for people’s action.  The problem with Filipinos is they easily shrug off mistakes, which is why they never learn from it. 

        The number of leftist will eventually go down when the economy picks up. The primary reason why people succumb to the leftist ideology is because there are more people living in a situation of having fewer resources or less income than others within a society. Arguably, increased economic activity can potentially solve this dilemma.

    • Hyden Toro says:

      @Lorenz

      Why work hard, when you can run for Public Office; delude people. Put your “sticky fingers” in public funds; then get rich…I have yet to see a high public official jailed for corruption. Sec. Puno, the self confessed bribe taker is being protected by Noynoy Aquino for receiving bribes…a good example of what I’m talking about…

      • bubi78 says:

        I did just that; I ran for kagawad in our barangay and luckily won, but there would be no dipping of “sticky fingers” for me…rather I would use this opportunity to put into practice what we are talking in this site and spread the word at the grass root level.

      • ilda says:

        Wow! a public  servant who reads Antipinoy! That’s really great news.

        Congrats bubi78

  12. Pingback: Tweets that mention South Korea: the country that the Philippines could have been -- Topsy.com

  13. juanon says:

    I’m from the game development industry, and I’d like to share something similar:
    10 years ago, the Korean game development industry was non-existent. The notion of a Korean-made game was laughable given that Japan and America have a huge established game development industry. 10 years later, now, they have more than 1000 game companies producing hundreds of games,  and SoKor has earned the title “Online Gaming Capital of the World”. 
    10 years ago, the Philippine game development industry was non-existent. 10 years later, now, we have roughly 50 game companies that are mostly for outsourcing of game assets. Almost none produce their own games.
    The way we see it, these are the following reasons to why SoKor’s game dev industry grew from nothing to gigantic in just 10 years:
    1) Their people are open-minded. They believe in “if they can do it, so can we!”, so they copied a “working equation” which is to make games art styles similar to Japan. They are proud of their work regardless of what other countries say as long as it brings development to their country. 
    We on the other hand have a twisted and warped notion of “tangkilikin lamang ang gawang Pinoy”. Any attempts to copy a “working equation” from a developed country is shrugged off as “gaya-gaya, nakakahiya” UNLESS it is sensationalized by the media and/or foreigners. Perfect example is Charice Pempengco who was a nobody here but is now loved by the masses because of Ellen DeGeneres. So many times have I heard people here look down on pinoy artists and game developers and look up to Korean artists and game developers, but the irony here is that A LOT OF PINOY ARTISTS AND DEVELOPERS ARE WORKING FOR KOREAN GAME COMPANIES.
    2) Their government is supportive of technology and have foresight. 10 years ago, the SoKor government thought that they should invest in improving their broadband connection because they believe that this will be an infrastructure for future businesses to grow. Take note, they DID NOT KNOW exactly what this improved broadband connection will be used for exactly. They just knew that information and technology is needed for growth. Later on, the private and business sector found ways to make use of this broadband connection, with online games being the most popular. The government then SUPPORTED the growth of these companies. They actually hired people from Japan and America to teach these companies how to make quality games. Additionally, their government encourages and educates its citizens on the importance of learning the English language. Proof that they are up to date with the times.
    Our government on the other hand is old fashioned and shrugs of technology as juvenile and unnecessary. Our government focuses on short-term gain, both legal and illegal, rather than long-term development. That ZTE deal could’ve have been very helpful for the growth of IT companies here, sadly corruption reared its ugly head.  And now I’m hearing politicians actually encouraging tagalog in schools and eliminate the english language, which is very baffling when OUTSOURCING IS WHAT’S KEEPING OUR COUNTRY AFLOAT. 

    • ilda says:

      Hi juanon

      That was a very interesting read. It’s really a shame another country is benefiting from our talent pool in the gaming industry. This only proves what I said in my earlier article that the anti-intellectual attitude of most Filipinos and even our own public servants are driving the intellectuals away from our own country. We are stuck in mediocre mindset because people think that being intelligent equals being evil. You can blame this on religion basically.

      Our culture also discourages individuals from being different which also discourages innovation. There is no way you can produce entrepreneurs when you don’t innovate.

      Filipinos easily get blinded by show business that’s why they would rather get into singing and dancing. Their main goal is to be the next Charice.

      You may also want to read:

      Is P-Noy’s anti-intellectual attitude turning intellectuals off the country?

      Filipinos cannot progress because of anti-elitist mentality

    • Jay says:

      Their government is supportive of technology and have foresight. 10 years ago, the SoKor government thought that they should invest in improving their broadband connection because they believe that this will be an infrastructure for future businesses to grow. Take note, they DID NOT KNOW exactly what this improved broadband connection will be used for exactly. They just knew that information and technology is needed for growth.

      Telecom infrastructure wise, it does help that they are one solid land mass, meaning they can invest putting in those fiber optic lines and have them run everywhere they can put it down. But of course that is no excuse for the Philippines, which is a smaller area despite being an archipelago. Also I’m not sure if its one of the consequences or precursors to it, but they were also convinced about online learning and saw the laying of those lines as potential to increase and diversify education. Simply put, those lines were probably cheaper than as well since they were not in demand but paid dividends when everything is trying to be on the internet, including pc gaming.

      They actually hired people from Japan and America to teach these companies how to make quality games

      This is true. Former Blizzard employees have come to help out certain Korean game companies. And Blizzard in the gaming world is certainly no strangers to making commercial successes with PC gaming.

      And now I’m hearing politicians actually encouraging tagalog in schools and eliminate the english language,

      Which is a baffling dichotomy indeed since in my generation, we actually appreciated English. And its not like they are taking away english to learn Ilocano and the other languages in the Philippines.

      Korean and Japan have the fastest and best price per speed in terms of internet, which not even America can keep up with. (Only sweden can probably boast better money-for-speed ratio). China has potential considering they are trying to make a virtual library of sorts and to move such information you would certainly need a blisteringly fast network as a base with the kind of data you can move around.

      And even pinoys are late in the gaming world they couldn’t even saturate the java/flash gaming, which is all of the rage in net based platforms.

  14. JUANDELACRUZ says:

    KUNG GANYAN KA HANGANG-HANGA MASYADO SA KOREANO, EH DI MAG-MIGRATE KA NA O KAYA MAG-ASAWA KA NG KOREANO KESA MAG-INGAY KA NA NAMAN. SIMPLE LANG NAMAN ANG SOLUSYON SA PROBLEMA MO DI BA ?

  15. AlvinEternal says:

    Here’s my side of the story about Korea’s success from a Christian POV:

    I’m a Bible school student and during my 3rd year, we’re studying about Korea’s place in… Christianity. During the time of the Japanese occupation, being a Christian to the Koreans is anti-Japanese. At the time of the Korean War, which it leads to the creation of North & South Korea (communist & democratic), Christianity in South Korea was strengthened. Even they have other religions like Confucianism & Buddhism, the Christian churches in South Korea are the fast-growing compared to other Asian countries like here. There is a story of one Korean pastor went to the Philippines in the ’60s while our country is progressing and still superior than Korea during that time. He went to Luneta, kneels down & pray, saying “Lord, please make our country like this.”

    20 years later, in the 1980s, South Korea became on of the most progressive countries in Asia (first is Japan) during that time. When that pastor came back in our country, he was disappointed about what he saw, went to Luneta, and prayed, “Lord, let this country be like Korea.”

    So Christianity had place in Korea’s success; my dad went to Korea 4 years ago and visted most of the churches there; heck, even they have prayer mountains! Also, they’re easy to identify who are the Catholic & Protestant churches kaysa sa Pinas dahil meron silang red & blue crosses, especially during the night.

    The Philippines was once said as “The Only Christian Nation in Asia”. But what’s weird is that why there are many missionaries coming to our country? The truth is that most Pinoys, mostly Catholics, never REALLY knew about Christ. Now I’m beginning to believe that Korea is the ONLY Christian nation in Asia since they were known for respect & faith in God.

    • blueredicedtea says:

      @alvin
      “The truth is that most Pinoys, mostly Catholics, never REALLY knew about Christ. Now I’m beginning to believe that Korea is the ONLY Christian nation in Asia since they were known for respect & faith in God.”

      god is long dead in the philippines…unfortunately.(i mean the christian concept concept of morality there does not apply. i hope that i didn’t hurt your feelings sorry.)
      most pinoys only use religions to fulfill their selfish needs “give us this day our daily hamburger with fries and carbonara” they dont think of their spirituality and why they were worshiping or what does the bible quotes really meant.

      • AlvinEternal says:

        Hehe, ok lang sa akin. BTW, I have seen many Korean churches here, especially in Makati. Pero hanga ako sa mga pangulo ng Korea; they even respect a minister. That’s because they believe that the minister served God while the president served the people.

        But there is still hope. Kaya nating baguhin ang ating bansa… kung willing tayong magbago.

    • ilda says:

      @AlvinEternal

      Good input regarding how Koreans absorb Christianity better than Filipinos. It’s really not surprising why even in religion; Koreans are better at soaking it in than us considering that Christianity has been introduced in their country only in recent history.  There are several reasons why this is so. One is because Koreans are intense people. They really take things seriously. They don’t just join something because it is “in.” 

      Another reason is because Filipinos are really bad copycats. Koreans obviously are spiritual but Filipinos are just religious. We are more into the dogma but short on reflection.

  16. JOn says:

    It would have been different the Philippines today. We were given a chance to be a state or republic after WWII. I watched one of Dick Gordon’s interview. MLQ sold us out during his tenure as president. They chose “Republic”. Do you remember this quote “I rather see the Philippines run like hell than the American run it like heaven” this is a selfish act and stupid quote. 

    • ilda says:

      MLQ is to blame for all this. Now his grandson, MLQ3 is working for P-Noy as part of the communications team. Unfortunately, he is not even making any difference.

  17. simplesimon says:

    I must say one of the better written articles here on AP but wanted to point out one fact:

    In 2005, after Borat hosted the European MTV Music Awards, it was widely reported that the Kazakhstan government had threatened legal action on Cohen for defamation. 

    READ MORE:
    http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/story?id=2506256&page=2

    Will comment more on your South Korea article later when I find time

    • Jay says:

      You missed out the last bit, which is also key.

      Borat has, however, recently been defended by Dariga Nazarbayeva, a politician and daughter of Kazakhstan’s President Nursultan Nazarbayev. She stated on a national news programme Karavan that Cohen’s website “damaged our image much less than its closure, which was covered by all global news agencies,” and “We should not be afraid of humour and we shouldn’t try to control everything, I think.”

      Besides, if you easily take that all out of context, Sacha Barton Cohen’s comedy has offended more interesting people and nations, such Jews (as he is one) among others.

      In short, anyone stupid enough to believe Borat’s mockumentary about Kazakhstan to be 100% real are idiots. Anyone stupid enough to try de-validate it is overcompensating for something.

      • AlvinEternal says:

        Hello, Sacha Baron Cohen is an AMERICAN comedian. I mean, is there any homosexuals who are offended in “Bruno”?

      • Jay says:

        It caused as much controversy and divide as the movie Machete due to being at the same time debuting with the hot issue of immigrants in Arizona. Though it makes no sense as Machete has long been in the works since 2006, years before the issue.

        put bruno and gays offended in google and you get results. Just nothing relevant about it, except a bunch of overtly sensitive minority groups maybe. Nothing to be balat sibuyas about.

      • simplesimon says:

        Hello din sa ‘yo BRITISH po siya

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacha_Baron_Cohen

      • simplesimon says:

        READ ON DUDES!!  You call Filipinos cry babies? Yes they cry, but don’t go as far as suing.

        Borat/Bruno (Sacha Baron Cohen) is probably the most “sued-after” celebrities around lol aside from being sought after :))

        This is all waaay higher profile than all your Adam Carollas and Alec Baldwins combined.

        http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1233714/Sacha-Baron-Cohen-hit-70m-lawsuit-Bruno-film-peace-activist-life-ruined.html

        http://www.tmz.com/2009/06/03/sasha-baron-cohen-sued-for-crippling-humor/

        http://digg.com/news/entertainment/Sacha_Baron_Cohen_Sued_For_126m_Over_Bruno

        http://www.aceshowbiz.com/news/view/00036344.html

        http://www.hollyscoop.com/sacha-baron-cohen/sacha-baron-cohen-sued_20431.aspx

        That’s the problem with a lot of articles on AP although some are well-written, but lacking enough RESEARCH and not based on FACTS just trying to get ATTENTION so comes out like a local, cheap TABLOID.

        THE LIST IS ENDLESS GO HELP` YOURSELVES ON GOOGLE:
        http://www.google.co.jp/search?hl=ja&source=hp&biw=1202&bih=704&q=people+who+sued+sacha+baron+cohen&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=

      • ilda says:

        @simplesimon

        Sorry but I don’t really waste my time on point-missers. You should have followed your first instinct. You already agreed with the article initially but then you just had to concentrate on a tiny statement, which is not even very important to the whole point of the article.

        I already mentioned that in one of my previous comments that those lawsuits could possibly be just publicity stunts but it’s up to you if you want to waste your time proving an otherwise pointless exercise.

        If you don’t like the articles here, what the heck are you doing here?

        Don’t let the door hit you on your way out 😆

        Ta-ta!

      • dumb-oh says:

        don’t forget the pinoys penchant for declaring persona-non-grata any person, whether kababayan or foreigner who hurl remarks that the former perceive as insulting.

      • simplesimon says:

        Oh so ILDA you’re saying it’s OK to hurl rocks on FILIPINOS 
        But it’s NOT OK to hurl rocks at AP? hmmmm
        Isn’t that a lop sided battle?

        What happened to freedom of speech, you can lash out all your anger to FILIPINOS but you have immunity to attacks to AP on your own website?

        Then make your website EXCLUSIVE then so the only people who can comment are the ones who will idiotically AGREE with your articles.

        Be prepared to be stung if you’re around bee hives 🙂

      • NotMasochisticFilipino says:

        “…………………you’re saying it’s OK to hurl rocks on FILIPINOS
        But it’s NOT OK to hurl rocks at AP? hmmmm,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,”

        If this is true, then why can you still post here? Besides, she is just asking, not driving you out.

        In the first place, this isn’t about racism. It is about giving idea on how Philippines can improve just like South Korea, which state is far worst years ago.

        “Be prepared to be stung if you’re around bee hives”

        Nobody will be able to post this here if this site ain’t “prepared to be stung”.

      • simplesimon says:

        @ILDA

        You invited me to read your post here remember? Hello? Nananahimik ako dun sa article ni Rafterman on Pacquiao fans as morons,  then sabi mo sa ‘kin to read your article on bakit di tayo nahuli sa boat papuntang Korea 🙂

        So here I am as you requested and mind you, I wasn’t concentrating on your error on Sacha Baron Cohen I said wait for my comments on the Korean topic when I find time ok here goes—-

        First of all; the best part of your article was — The Republic of Korea: A story with a happy ending ok na ok yun wa ako masabi — those 20- or so paragraphs were awesome we should really learn from the Koreans, I totally agree, unfortunately, one problem we have is that THEY can afford to go study abroad and return to Korea to apply what they learned, for us Filipinos hindi pa natin kaya yan our main goal is to make money abroad for now, then hopefully if our kids and grandchildren di nila ubusin ang pera sa paglakwatcha sa SM sana maka afford din silang makapag-aral abroad to come back and help improve our economy (but let’s get into that topic next time mahaba haba yan)

        Sablay lang yung article mo in my honest opinion ok na sana kung wala na yung first half eh yung intro mo especially these 3 statements—

        1. Unfortunately, most Filipinos in general think that Korea owe us some kind of apology for being offended by something that ordinary Koreans most likely perceive to be merely a joke and, in the case of the South Korean government, an exercise of their sovereign right

        —-sovereign right? are you kidding, who has sovereign right to make fun of another country? michael moore makes fun of fellow americans fine, you guys here coz you’re mostly Pinoys anyway you can make fun of us Pinoys all you want magkakamag anak naman tayo eh sige lang wag lang magpatayan kung dyan kayo masaya eh di namin kayo mapipigilan 🙂

        2. Where did our sense of humor go? Did we even have one? Or do we see it as only “we” having the right to poke fun at others?

        —-heto heto ang sinasabi ko sa ‘yo, you contradict yourself here eh you are poking on Pinoys but when someone pokes at your articles, you get defensive and say we didn’t get your point, and you label us who don’t agree and are not amused you turn the table around tell us that we are THE anti-pinoy and not you, right?

        3. I don’t recall Kazakhstan asking for an apology from Sacha Baron Cohen (Borat) when he dedicated an entire film to depicting a caricature of its people.

        —nuff said about that but let me point out that you could have just admitted “oh I’m sorry my bad I should have done more research on Kazakhstan vs. Borat”

        4. Extra readings for you kasi to give you a little break from your hectic schedule on the PINOY FAULT FINDING COMMISSION there are many many incidents where people (mind you, not PINOYS) are sometimes banned completely from the public view for politically incorrect behavior the most notorious of all is the first one:

        Exhibit A
        SINEAD O’ CONNOR VERSUS THE POPE
        http://www.notbored.org/sinead.html

        Exhibit B
        PRINCE HARRY REPRIMANDED FOR USING THE WORDS PAKI AND RAGHEAD
        http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article5492961.ece

        Dami pa sana eh kaya lang maybe bored ka na ’til next time 🙂 will leave the rest of the research to you but I am sure you got the idea na…

        Let me tell you the truth you are my favorite writer on AP I realized, that’s why I enjoy reading stuff here, I get to be the evil guy, sa facebook kasi ang bait bait ko dun eh lol

      • ilda says:

        @simplesimon

        Did you say nananahimik ka sa article ni rafterman?!? More like nanggugulo dude.

        It is quite obvious that your lengthier comment now is just an afterthought after I told you that you were trivialising too much.
        But anyway, in response to you:

        1. Thank you for your compliment about my article. My next blog will be dedicated to you because you still make all kinds of excuses for Da Pinoy 😉

        2. Conveniently, you gave Pinoys a shallow excuse for being “Asia’s laggard” by saying Filipinos can’t afford to study abroad. Yeah, right. There are so many Filipinos who study abroad who don’t use their acquired skills or knowledge to help uplift the nation because of the “padrino” system. If you agree with the Korean comparison in my article, you should have realised that they even had a harsher experience when they were still under dictatorship from the 1960s until late 1980s. Ordinary Korean citizens could not even travel abroad. While during Marcos time there were so many Filipinos going abroad to study but they came back to live like kings and queens in the Philippines. Our culture is the problem. It even stops educated people from using their critical analysis.

        3. When I said “in the case of the South Korean government, an exercise of their sovereign right,” I was referring to the six Filipinos who were deported because they were in the blacklist of the Korean government. I was not referring to the joke. Use your comprehension skills. 😉

        4. Speaking of the joke by that Korean actress, you have to joking when you compared the reaction of Filipinos to a less than five minute skit about how Filipinos speak English to the reaction of some people to an entire film about Kazakhstan. And in fact Kazakhstan people themselves were not as outraged as Filipinos.

        And by the way, if you read my article again you will find that I did not have to do any research about any complaints against Sacha Baron Kohen because as I said in the article: “I don’t recall Kazakhstan asking for an apology from Sacha Baron Cohen (Borat) when he dedicated an entire film to depicting a caricature of its people Get that? I don’t recall, meaning I don’t recall. Additional meaning: if the people of Kazakhstan did make a big deal of the film, I would have remembered it very well and I did not feel the need to research on it because it was not the point of the whole article and it still does not change the fact that Filipinos like you are such crybabies. And as Jay kindly pointed out to you:

        Borat has, however, recently been defended by Dariga Nazarbayeva, a politician and daughter of Kazakhstan’s President Nursultan Nazarbayev. She stated on a national news programme Karavan that Cohen’s website “damaged our image much less than its closure, which was covered by all global news agencies,” and “We should not be afraid of humour and we shouldn’t try to control everything, I think.”

        All the links that you provided had nothing to do with the film Borat but more to do with the film Bruno. It goes to show that it was hard for you to find any complaints against the Borat film. What was the point of wasting your time pasting the links to something not relevant to the article?

        There is a big difference to a comedian making a joke and to someone like Prince Harry who is a member of the Royal family making rude remarks just like Mai Mislang who is a presidential aide when she made rude remarks about the Vietnamese people. You should know the difference by now if you fancy yourself as educated.

      • simplesimon says:

        Ooops sorry 4 statements pala my bad toink!

      • Jay says:

        You call Filipinos cry babies? Yes they cry, but don’t go as far as suing.

        Ahem, exhibit A:

        http://argument.88-mph.net/files/philippine-defense-squad.txt

        Which follows to more exhibits which you can google in that link.

        is probably the most “sued-after” celebrities around lol

        Yeah… your point? He lives and operates in the land where the law can be made profit with precise and concise interpretation. Do the people who sue him get their money? No. Guess who wasted resources? Also he’s sued by minority groups or individuals, as opposed to …

        This is all waaay higher profile than all your Adam Carollas and Alec Baldwins combined.

        Which were paid attention to literally by a specific ethnic group and certain politicians (LOL Bong Revilla) who has tendencies to not deal well when someone magnifies their shame to the world. If you want proof, check the list I linked to you.

        As of high profile, its pretty much flash in the pan considering how the charges on him don’t stick and the case fades into obscurity from the public eye. Meanwhile, Carolla had his FB page bombarded and squattered by pinoys for a period of MONTHS, incurring racial and whatever insults to a guy who already (by formality) apologized.

        That’s the problem with a lot of articles on AP although some are well-written, but lacking enough RESEARCH and not based on FACTS just trying to get ATTENTION so comes out like a local, cheap TABLOID.

        LOL I’m simpletonsimon, I made that conclusion I wrote by reading a few articles and was instead of understanding the significance of the sources, I let my emotions go overboard and focus on the small issue like that other guy GabbyDomingo who used to post here.

        Cheap tabloid? Your responses read like an angry video game nerd who doesn’t even know how much of the facts they are pulling out of their arse.

        Oh so ILDA you’re saying it’s OK to hurl rocks on FILIPINOS

        What was that old saying in tagalog? bato bato sa langit ang tamaan huwag magalit? Filipinos have been hurling rocks sky high for quite some time now. AP is just chronicling when it falls down on them while the Pinoys who did and got hurt try hide their embarrassment.

        Then make your website EXCLUSIVE then so the only people who can comment are the ones who will idiotically AGREE with your articles.

        Try disagree at FV and be vehement about it. See if they let you stick around. Same with other pro pinoy forums. We actually value input from other people, even if it isn’t as critically thought out as they perceive it to be. The problem with people like you who disagree is usually they do so by dismissing the site as hearsay (and maybe claiming other sources of info in the Philippines like inquirer, ABS-CBN, among others as legit) or others who claim another solution through obtuse conjectures, which if you read the whole RH Bill articles, we get yahoos who think its a conspiracy to destroy poor people, Ayn Rand students who are caught up too much on their extreme capitalist concepts and uppity catholitards who are willing to stick to their doctrine but claim it to be good.

        Be prepared to be stung if you’re around bee hives

        How about you prepare a counter argument that is idiot proof and then we can have a nice, intelligent discussion. Work on your critical thinking while you are at it. Much like its hard to discuss a class about the subject of thermodynamics if you haven’t don’t have a solid foundation for physics. Besides, your googlefu is nice but any 5 year old can do it.

      • ilda says:

        lol…jay 😆

      • Jay says:

        Also simon, have some integrity. Giving up on someone who responded to your LONG meaningful post to show point by point your need to improve on making your point is something you shouldn’t do if you want to show your logical and reasoning ability. If you don’t like what you are reading, feel free to take a siesta in FV, PEX or barrio7 where they will welcome your triumphalist ideas with open arms, as long as you don’t ever disagree with the mods.

        Adios and take care!

      • simplesimon says:

        @ILDA

        1. YES, keep at it, fault finding job, yup you’re the experts there will leave that up to you. So you’re gonna make me famous huh? Cool. Can’t pay you though sorry.

        2. (Buzzer ring) Booo. Wrong answer. The problem when we go abroad most people NEVER come back. And even if they do come back what’s the point going back to the squatter area where you were? Bakit ka pa nag abroad? Hello?

        3. My comprehension? Or you’re just making excuses for wrong order of thoughts in your statements there?

        4. IF YOU CAN’T RECALL THEN SHUT UP about it instead of writing something you obviously  KNOW NOTHING ABOUT, now ka lang nag re research eh after my post hahahahaha too late now

        Naduling ka ba sa pag post ko ng Borat stuff ang dami no? Goes to show your theory that Pinoys are the only crybabies in the world is NOT TRUE which comprised about half of your article 🙂 eh so false statements no?

        In your post in refterman’s article “hey simplesimon I’m glad you’re still here” did you really mean that or you’re just using me to increase the comments on your Korea article kasi dun 200 plus na eh yung sa yo nangungulelat at 80 plus pa lang (at the time previous to my post)

        You’re breaking my heart I’m crying like a crybaby now 😦 How selfish of you, so antipinoy of you! hahahaha

        Ta-ta!

      • ilda says:

        @simplesimon

        That’s the problem with Da Pinoy like you. When they cannot give a better answer, they resort to calling us “fault-finder.” How convenient. We only speak the truth and it is up to people like you if you can deal with it. Obviously you can’t so you are trying your best to deflect the blame.

        You are now talking about OFW’s who have nothing to go back to in the country but what about those who belong to the “so-called elite” who come back after getting their MBA’s from abroad? They still don’t make a difference because they are still focused on “pakikisama” with their own kind.

        And why do you think majority of Filipinos who went abroad would rather stay there? It’s because the system sucks in Da Pinas. It doesn’t matter how many times they tried to make a difference but if they are against the powerful but stupid so-called “elite,” there’s very little difference to be made. I don’t blame them because trying to make a difference on the NET is way better than wasting their time calling for rallies and causing chaos on the streets of Manila.

        Excuse me but I did not have to google any Borat lawsuits because I was confident they wouldn’t be as outrageous as the reaction of the Filipinos to the comedy skit. I just clicked on the links you provided which turned out to be links to lawsuits against Bruno. I already told you that but you just keep trying to make a useless point.

        Mas crybabies pa din ang mga Pinoy compared to people anywhere in the world because pati small time comedy by a Korean actress pinapatulan pa. It would have been different if Sacha Baron Cohen made a film about the Philippines similar to Borat and made fun of Filipinos. Pero hinde, less than 5 minutes skit and they still demanded an apology?!? What a bunch of losers!

        Now you are just being pathetic because I still have it on record that you liked my article initially but now you are trying to belittle it with no success.

        Good luck na lang sayo 😆

      • simplesimon says:

        @JAY

        Whoa are you stalking me? hahah

        Sorry pare iniwan kita dun sa rafterman article…ewan ko ba boring ka talaga kasi kausap eh you couldn’t take a hint? Haba ng mga answers mo kasi inaantok ako sorry talaga 🙂

        Mas gusto ko na kausap si ILDA now, ayoko na dun boring na yung Pacquiao topic eh

        Alam mo na “Pinoy” ako maikli ang attention span haha

        Imagine mo na lang nakatambay tayo sa isang bar at a party sponsored by AP lumapit ka sa kin di ko type topic mo I roamed around the bar and here I am pero such a boring party will go home soon 🙂

        Hanap ka na lang ng ibang kausap ok?

      • Jay says:

        @simpletonsimon

        TL;DR

  18. Jay says:

    The average Korean is ambitious and works furiously hard and long hours. There is even a saying that “Korea is the one society in the world in which the Chinese go broke and the Japanese look lazy”.

    Its probably a saying built on the fact of competition. With all three being competitive in terms of research and intelligence, you need a motivating, or driving force to at least go beyond what is expected. Thing is, they don’t settle for less especially with the boundaries of the mind.

    Having played Civ 3 Warlords Expasion and having the Koreans, one thing that stood out was the value they put in education.

    Like other East Asian countries with a Confucian heritage, South Korea has had a long history of providing formal education. Although there was no state-supported system of primary education, the central government established a system of secondary schools in Seoul and the provinces during the Choson Dynasty. State schools suffered a decline in quality, however, and came to be supplanted in importance by the sowon, the academies that were the centers of a neo-Confucian revival in the sixteenth century

    Which has a lot do with their thinking, having embraced Christianity after having been through older eastern concepts like Confucianism, Taoism and buddhism. Some also probably view studying overseas not just a cheaper alternative, but an experience.

    And odd enough, while the Filipinos fixation on their own despite being a strong 90 million, the Koreans don’t necessarily fixate themselves unless its a growing trend (Like football). Then again, with so many successful people, there is no real reason to look up to a few idols to emulate a work ethic. Through the values they learn, they know it already. All that is needed is execution.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_American

    They recognized that they needed to adjust their attitude towards race, the concept of citizenship based on blood, the underlying fear and intolerance of outsiders because “it was the greatest single weakness in their culture”

    Certainly applied to Hines Ward, a successful NFL player who is half Korean/Half african-american. Upon winning the superbowl in 2005, he took him mom (korean) back and ironically was heralded by the country as a hero and given the keys to the city and the red carpet treatment in Seoul. At the same time he also visited the community of children who are of half korean ethnicities and raised awareness and became an advocate for their acceptance in society.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hines_Ward

  19. simplesimon says:

    Sorry, ILDA, I read this article twice but for some reason it comes out like a conversation sa kanto ng dalawang tambay

    Tambay 1: Pare, alam mo dapat mayaman na kami eh
    Tambay 2: Talaga pare? Bakit ano ba nangyari?
    Tambay 1: Hayun na promote kasi si Pareng Tikoy ako hindi tapos na lay off pa ‘ko langya
    Tambay 2: Ano gagawin mo ngayon?
    Tambay 1: Wala…ano magagawa mo kinukwento ko lang naman sa ‘yo makinig ka lang, thanks for listening pare…

    (ugh!)

    • NotMasochisticFilipino says:

      So ano dapat ang gagawin ni tambay 1 sa palagay mo?

      • simplesimon says:

        I think the answer is quite obvious. You really wanna discuss that? I can go on and on on that one 🙂

      • NotMasochisticFilipino says:

        Ah yes, please do. I’m very curious.

        A hint on my reaction: “It is much easier to change yourself than others”.

      • ilda says:

        @NotMasochisticFilipino

        He won’t say it because it is tantamount to admitting that AP writers are correct after all 😉

        He is one of those Filipinos who know deep inside that there is a problem but would rather not do anything about it.

      • simplesimon says:

        OK YOU’RE ASKING FOR IT HUH?

        1. GET A NEW JOB
        2. STOP THE TAMBAY MODE WHICH IS WHAT AP BLOGGERS ARE REALLY
        3. WORK HARDER THAN YOUR PARENG TIKOY
        4. STOP BEING BITTER LIKE GUYS IN A BAR, OH I COULD HAVE BEEN TOM CRUISE 

        ANY 12-YEAR OLD KNOWS THE ABOVE ANSWERS RIGHT?

        I THOUGHT PEOPLE HERE ARE A LOT OLDER THAN THAT

        Just wrote what you wanted to hear. You don’t even need a sarcasm detector for that one.

      • Jay says:

        1. I got one
        2. So are other forum sites. Are you going to stop them too?
        3. Work smarter than your old folks who think working hard solves everything.
        4. Use common sense for once.

        LOL go check your maturity level so you can DEAL WITH IT

        Even a 12 year old can troll better than you.

    • benign0 says:

      Bottom line that most morons don’t understand is quite simple:

      The Philippines is the sad result of lots and lots of “actions” underpinned by very little thinking.

      So some actually come here (or any blog for that matter) thinking that they’d take a bit of a kick-arse attitude and check out whether people are actually walking the talk that they articulate in their blogs. And that is what is indicative of the smallness of the sorts of minds that challenge people to exhibit evidence of “actions” to back up the ideas they table on these blogs.

      If these bozos stop, get off their high horses, and reflect on what
      (1) visiting blogs;
      (2) reading the work exhibited in those blogs; and,
      (3) commenting on what they read…

      … is really all about, perhaps the cluier ones among them will realise that what one does in their personal (off-line) time and outside of writing blogs falls under the realm of mere speculation.

      In short when visiting a blog; one can only comment on what one reads in said blog. Anything outside of the scope of what is articulated on said blog is information that is subject to privileged access because it is not part of the public domain.

      Then again, seeing how difficult a concept this is to articulate (as evident in how much of my brilliant writing above will probably be incomprehensible to mediocre minds), it’s a bit of a stretch to expect argumentum ad hominem to be eradicated from the blogosphere anytime soon — much less from the Pinoy blogosphere specifically where thinking is at a renowned low.

      Indeed:

      (though not for the small-minded) 😀

      • simplesimon says:

        @Benigno

        Thanks for the kind words, your royal highness 🙂

        @ILDA

        You know what’s the most absurd part of your comparison to South Korea and our pathetic Philippines is this line in your article (sana inomit mo na lang mas ok pa)
        ———
        “It is obvious that authoritarian rule has done more good than harm for the Korean people overall. It instilled discipline and a strong sense of nationalism in its people.”
        ———

        How can you quote that up there hahahaha!

        Aside from hard work and proper leadership and all the wonderful things you mentioned about the Koreans this one stood out the best—- they had a “strong sense of nationalism in its people” 

        So I therefore conclude if we all follow all you AP gestapos in here there will be no more Filipinos left who will have ANY SENSE OF NATIONALISM for being born a Filipino because like the hard core criminal in A Clockwork Orange, you would have successfully made the average Filipino feel like we are the total scums of the earth.

        Thank goodness there’s just a few of you (whew)

        So we still have hope 🙂

        OK enough mind pollution for me, good luck!

      • ilda says:

        Tsk-tsk…your response is what I call ‘scraping the bottom of the barrel’ mr simpleton. Your idol must be MLQ because you prefer the Philippines to be run like hell by Filipinos.

        One just has to look at the sequence of your comments on this thread to see that you are very, very inconsistent. Let me quote what you said earlier:

        I must say one of the better written articles here on AP…

        and this:

        First of all; the best part of your article was — The Republic of Korea: A story with a happy ending ok na ok yun wa ako masabi — those 20- or so paragraphs were awesome we should really learn from the Koreans, I totally agree

        Now you are trying to act unimpressed?!? As the saying goes: “lokohin mo ang lelang mo.” 😆

        Adios!

      • NotMasochisticFilipino says:

        Do you like anti-thesis?

        Then, I think you’d laugh very hard when I say AP bloggers have strong sense of nationalism, they point out what is wrong with Philippines, so that hopefully, people will gradually catch up to it then decide if they agree and hopefully, take action. In this sense, those who pretends that these flaw doesn’t exists and instead unconsciously inflict damage are the “not nationalistic” ones……. no, traitors.

        I’m not going to compare who loves the country more so I suggest you do the same.

      • simplesimon says:

        Hahahahahaahaha! 
        Uy nasaktan ng husto si Lelang Ilda hahahaha! Ngiti naman ng konti dyan lalo ka tumatandang dalaga nyan eh

        Inconsistencies??? You make me laugh so hard 
        Di mo pala ma distinguish ang difference between “the best part of your article” and “the most absurd” part lol you’re the one being inconsistent! hahaha

        You’re asking Filipinos to follow the Korean example of “strong sense of nationalism” with such hypocrisy while being under an AGAINST FILIPINOS (ANTI PINOY) website how absurd can you be?
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypocrisy
        And you keep saying goodbye to me as if you own the internet! lol

        @NotMasochisticFilipino

        Wow ha!

        Ako pa ang traitor lol you guys are really funny.

        Thanks for the jokes! No wonder no one takes you guys seriously, maybe you should all change careers and become full-time comedians 🙂

      • ilda says:

        Nope. Buko ka na as a troll so you are obviously just desperate now to sound “cool” .

        Tough luck dude.

      • NotMasochisticFilipino says:

        “Ako pa ang traitor lol you guys are really funny.”

        ……….. nope, you are funnier thank you very much. I even believed that is the last thing that you’ll use as a reply.

        Thanks for the jokes! No wonder no one takes you guys seriously, maybe you should all change careers and become full-time comedians ”

        Oh, you flatter us. We still can’t beat the likes of Carlin and Adam Carolla.

  20. joe says:

    what’s so offending about that? i could say it was somewhat true that most if not many do speak the english language that way. Ironically we somewhat have one of the biggest area and most numerous people on the BPO industry which subsequently speak English a bit well or above average if not very impressively. What i have learned so far in social communication practice is that it does not really matter what kind of accent one may have as long as it’s audible and far more it has sense. American’s have a different twang, the kiwis do have their own slang, even the british folks too. and they do not wish to sound like the others, they are unique and they wish to stay that way but representng their tongues the best way they know. So let us just be happy about that joke and think about it this way “atleast she knows how we speak it, right?”

    • Jay says:

      You’d be surprised. As a kid who practiced his English, I was emulating everyone’s different delivery of it. From Southern accents, to Ahnuld, to Clinton, to Northeastern/New York accents, Hindi/Paki english accents, etc.

      Its only a few people who are bothered by the delivery of it all and are insensitive about it. I mean so what if Aussie and England add ‘ou’ to words like neighbor or color? Just something you have to get used to when you visit those places.

    • ilda says:

      Yes Joe, that’s a very good question. There was nothing offensive about it. But Filipino crybabies made a big deal of it, unfortunately.

  21. simplesimon says:

    Dear AP,

    Ok no more jokes, this is a serious question I would like to address to AP and enlighten me please.

    Let’s say you live in an apartment or maybe a condo unit in Makati. 
    We all live in the same condo unit, I live in room 502 for example, Benigno lives in 501, Ilda lives in 503.

    Benigno one day decides to tell his family hey let’s clean up the house. For some reason, 
    Ilda also decides to clean up the house.

    So all of Benigno’s and Ilda’s families took out all their junk into the hallway.

    Since I live in between your units, there is no way for me to get in or out of my own apartment kasi lahat ng basura niyo nakakalat na sa hallway eh.

    So nakiusap ako please paki alis naman ang junk niyo sa hallway, I paid good money for my unit din naman we’re all paying good money for our units why don’t you just keep your junk inside your house kasi sagabal na eh…

    But to make matters worse, Benigno and Ilda took all of their junk and decided to put them right in front of the Condo outside the partking lot for all to see. Ang dami na ngayon nag complain ang baho na talaga sa buong condo, we all complained, pero falling on deaf ears kasi hetong si Benigno and Ilda continued throwing their garbage freely outside the condo.

    Questions:
    !. Do they have the right to do that?
    2.Their original motive was clear, they wanted to clean their units, but  they took out all of their junk outside of their units and in doing so affected everyone else, so what can we do?

    So to AP writers/bloggers/members why do you throw garbage outside your units for all to see? Actually, we don’t need your garbage, we have our own garbage but we dispose of them properly. THERE ARE ways to dispose of garbage properly. Actually throwing garbage outside your units without proper disposal is illegal.

    Catch my drift, critical thinkers?

    Andun na kami na gusto nating linisin ang Pilipinas, na lahat magbago ang Da Pinoy and Da Pilipinas. Kailangan niyo pa bang isabog ang tae at basura sa labas ng bahay at bakuran niyo at di niyo naisip na malaki ang epekto nito sa ating mga kapitbahay?

    Ganito kasi ang nangyayari dito eh wala na ngang naso solve na problema nagbubuhos pa kayo ng gasollina sa apoy.

    Tama ba yang ginagawa niyo? Paano na lang ang kinabukasan ng Pilipinas at mga anak at apo natin kung puros basura ng Pilipinas ang pinag didisplay niyo dito sa internet?

    Kung talagang mahal niyo ang pamilya niyo, ang condo, unit niyo, ang neighborhood niyo, ang lungsod niyo, ang bayan niyo, please lang.

    Kung di niyo iniisip ang kinabukasan ng mga sariling anak nyo at apo niyo isipin nyo naman ang mga kapwa tao niyo.

    Nakakasira na kayo talaga. Hindi na talaga tama yan.

    You’re taking freedom of speech too far. Paano ngayon ang mga potential investors na gusto sana tumulong sa pag-unlad natin, heto bang AP website ang brochure na ipapakita natin sa kanila?

    Kung gusto niyo talagang ituloy itong hangarin nyo ok lang sige kung di namin kayo talaga mapipigilan, pero isang suggestion lang naman, pakiusap lang kung puede sana gamitin ang Tagalog sa halip ng Ingles para tayo tayong Pilipino ang magtulungan na matungunan ng solusyon ang mga problema natin. Bakit kailangan pa nating ibulgar sa wikang Ingles sa mga dayuhan ang ating mga kahinaan at problema? Gusto niyo lang bang ipakita ang inyong pagkadalubhasa sa wikang Ingles na kayo ay may mas mataas na pinag-aralan at kaya niyong tapak tapakan ang kapwa niyong Pilipino na di nakapag tapos ng pag-aaral? Karamihan pa naman sa inyong pinatatamaan sa inyong mga artikulo ay ang masang Pilipino na marahil karamihan ay hindi maka intindi ng Ingles at malamang di rin nila nababasa ang inyong sinusulat dito sa mga pahinang ito.

    Kung may personal na problema ka Benigno at Ilda, isinusulat niyo ba ang lahat lahat sa Internet para mabasa ng lahat? Yan ba ang tamang paraan para malutas ang inyong problema?

    Kung matapos ko’ng isulat itong pakiusap sa niyo at pagtatawanan niyo o kaya’y babaligtarin ang aking mga pangungusap at hahanapan ng mali ang aking mensahe ay wala na talaga akong magagawa. Hangga’t natupad ko lang ang aking tungkulin bilang Pilipino.

    Sa mga nakaraang posts ko dito di ako napakinggan at sa halip ako ay pinagtutulungan, di na ako umaasa na mapakinggan dahil alam kong ika nga ni Benigno ay makitid ang aking utak inaamin ko na mas matatalino kayong lahat kaysa sa akin, pero kung meron pa kayong natitirang konsyensya at kung mayroon sa inyo ang sumasang-ayon, sana pagpalain kayo.

    Nakikiusap,

    Mga kapwa niyo Pilipino

    • BongV says:

      simplesimon:

      i’ll keep it simple –

      keep your eyes open – you live in a junkyard.
      doesn’t matter who takes the junk out of the hall – y’all still live in a junkyard.

      ***

      number two – you don’t own the Internet – you didn’t pay for it –

      ***

      number three – even if investors wanted to invest – they don’t want to be minority shareholders when they pay 100% of the capital – your constitution that stipulates the 60/40 is JUNK –

      if you really wanna do the Filipinos a service and get rid of your junkyard of a house – I say join AP in campaigning for charter change

      ***

      number four – you live in a junkyard and you complain about people and their junk – it does not make sense.

      ****
      develop your critical thinking… who really is spewing junk?

      the one who elects stupid people – or the one who made the observation that someone elected a stupid candidate

      the one who elected Aquino – or the one who made the observation that electing Aquino is stupid?
      what can you say about Aquino and – wangwang, the botched hostage handling, Hacienda Luisita – genius?

      who really is the antipinoy? 😉

    • ilda says:

      @simplesimon

      First of all, your analogy is wrong. It’s not our unit we are trying to clean up. It’s your unit we are trying to clean up. We want you to get rid of all the misguided thoughts you have about being a Filipino because your idea of what being a Filipino is hasn’t been working for decades now and you need to adopt a new way of thinking in order to improve.

      You might ask what is it to us if your house is not clean? It would be easy for us to just leave you alone but when your house is not clean, other people get affected. When your house is not clean and things are chaotic, nothing gets done properly. When your house is not clean, your health and well-being gets affected. Because you can’t think straight, the people around you gets affected and then you also act like a victim. You act like a victim and try to come up with all kinds of excuses why you can’t clean up your house. Then when an Ondoy happens, other nations will have to come to everyone else’s rescue – mas nakakahiya. All the junk you were trying to hide inside your house ay mabubulatlat din.

      When you said:

      Andun na kami na gusto nating linisin ang Pilipinas, na lahat magbago ang Da Pinoy and Da Pilipinas

      Your statement is not exactly true. Not every Filipino agrees that the Philippines is a mess. Most even think that the Philippines and the Filipino people are the greatest.

      There are a majority of Filipinos who think that the only ones to blame for our sorry situation are the corrupt public officials. That’s not right too. Who voted them into office in the first place?

      It’s one thing to vote someone popular and unqualified but it’s another to not care about how the country is being run. Just look at what is happening now. Pagkatapos iboto si P-Noy, pinapabayaan na lang nila magkalat yung tao. Dios na lang daw ang bahala. Anong klase ang pag-iisip na yan? Sana mag lang, they monitor closely how P-Noy is doing and if they see that he is doing badly, demand that he shape up or ask him to step down because he is just wasting everyone’s time.

      We are not taking our freedom of speech too far. You are underestimating the international media. Don’t you realise that even if we don’t write about the ills of the nation, they will find out eventually when another tragedy occurs? Other nations are affected too when they have to help with the man-made disasters that happen inside our backyard. It is also their business to keep their region safe from any dirt spilling over from ours like refugees and etc.

      We write because we want other nations to know that despite all the embarrassing behaviour of some of our compatriots, there are still Filipinos like us who can think rationally and who are also fed up with our public servant’s incompetence and mga kababawan of other Pinoys who demand for apologies because they are too insecure and sensitive.

      You don’t seem to understand that the only way for Filipinos to shape up is for other people from the international community to intervene. Most Filipinos prefer to bask in their perceived glory and pretend there is nothing wrong. If you don’t believe me, then just think about the conditions Hillary Clinton asked the Philippine government before giving us a grant. Other nations can’t continue to keep giving us aid if things aren’t improving anyway.

      What you want is for us to hide the truth from the international community. Even if we do that, the truth will catch up on us. It is better for them to know that there are Filipinos who can still think rationally, which can give this sad situation a glimmer of hope.

      We cannot pretend. We as a people have been pretending for too long now. It’s everyone’s business to know the truth as well before it’s really too late.

      • NotMasochisticFilipino says:

        “First of all, your analogy is wrong. It’s not our unit we are trying to clean up. It’s your unit we are trying to clean up. We want you to get rid of all the misguided thoughts you have about being a Filipino because your idea of what being a Filipino is hasn’t been working for decades now and you need to adopt a new way of thinking in order to improve.”

        Hahahaha!!!!! Ano ka perpekto na walang basura?

        “We cannot pretend. We as a people have been pretending for too long now. It’s everyone’s business to know the truth as well before it’s really too late. ”

        Tapos, sasabihin mo na wag magkunwari e kayo nga dito ang nagkukunwaring malinis e.

        …………..sorry, I’m trying to lessen other commentors’ posts.

      • benign0 says:

        The truth is that there is only one underlying truth about Pinoys, and that is that:

        Filipinos are driven by hiya.

        In short (and I will Tagalogize because what you are about to read comes out a lot better in Tagalog, given that it is a non-technical/scientific concept):

        Kelangan pahiyain ang Pinoy sa buong mundo upang ang mga ito ay magkaroon ng malakas na motibasyong mag-bago.

        The solution is quite obvious: Pinoys are monumentally mortified when their sad dysfunction is broadcast to the rest of the world for everyone to gawk at.

        And that, dude, is why some of us here (including me) make it a point to write all of this stuff in English — so that the whole world can check it out and be privy too to The Truth about Da Pinoy Condition. 😀

      • ilda says:

        Alam mo NotMasochisticFilipino, we are all a work in progress. It’s just that some of us have more work to be done because some of us are in deeper mess than others. That’s why they need all the help from those who are already ahead whether it’s financially, spiritually or intellectually.

        The problem with Da Pinoy is that they are too proud. They have no problem receiving foreign aid but ironically, they think that it is an insult to them when others tell them that they need to shape up so they don’t have to rely on foreign aide too much.

        Nowhere in my response did I say I am or we are perfect. And just in case you forgot, mr simpleton was the one who initially used that analogy.

        Anyway, thanks for the concern.

    • benign0 says:

      Quite simple, Simplesimon, (and Ms Ilda, forgive me if I repeat some of what you already said):

      The basura you cite as an example physically inconveniences people. They are a mess that cannot be ignored as far as your quaint story goes.

      On the other hand, the stuff we publish here in AP is available to readers who voluntarily come to read them. In fact, you can choose to ignore them if you choose (of course understanding the peril you place yourself in by doing so 😉 ).

      It’s simple, really™ — though not for the small-minded.

  22. Maki_Alam says:

    A couple of days ago my dad caught this guy dumping his garbage in the vacant lot next to our house. Syempre sinita nya. Sabi nung guy, “E wala namang babala na nagsasabing bawal magtapon ng basura dito a.” Sabi ng dad ko, “Kailangan mo pa ba ng babala?”

    Yan ang mentality ng Pinoy. Tapos pag na-Ondoy, rerekla-reklamo.

    Kung sino-sino sinisisi, hindi na lang magkusa na ayusin muna ang sarili. Tapos pag nasita o napuna, puro palusot.

  23. simplesimon says:

    I am very much impressed, your replies to my humble pleas exposed how perfectly twisted your critical thinking is.

    @Ilda
    Since when did you start cleaning other people’s houses, is this your real profession? And when did I ask you to clean my house? How did you even get in my house without my permission? Who do you think you are?????

    @BongV
    How do you know I live in a junkyard, any proof of your claims? And no thanks for joining AP, I will never join the dark side.

    @Benigno

    You, you, you, are a classic! You are definitely the Charles Manson of AP.

    Exposing other’s people’s faults to make them change shall we? tsk tsk tsk

    Your children have failing grades in school so you put them all on the university bulletin board to FORCE them to get rid of their “hiya” and FORCE them to study harder. You even went as far as posting them on your children’s facebook so all their friends will know. Perhaps this will make them study harder? Think again.

    Your wife was caught cheating on you so you decided to spread their sex video on the internet of her and her lover, goes around the internet to make her CHANGE HER WAYS and hopefully stop cheating on you. Think again.

    Your family surprises you on your birthday with a big birthday cake while taking a video and as they open your bedroom door SURPRISE! you are caught in the act of masturbating while watching porn. So without asking your permission, they upload this video to all your friends and officemates via your facebook and spreads like wildfire on youtube, because they wanted you TO CHANGE YOUR WAYS by exposing your evil ways. Think again.

    Is this your LOGIC?

    Do you know HIYA is actually a virtue? Because if you don’t have it, you are actually WALANGHIYA and that puts you in the category of an ANIMAL, which means you can grope someone on the LRT while people around you giving you the evil look you and you ignore them because you don’t have “hiya” because for you, what you’re doing is perfectly fine because it makes you feel good. A police officer arrests you and you’re on front page of all the major newspapers. Yes, people think definitely you will never do it again. Lesson learned right? However, you do it again the next day anyway, because you have no “hiya”. You don’t care what people think of you or what you’re doing is WRONG.

    You perfectly know that the Japanese are so dedicated to their jobs, they work hard so that they can keep their HONOR and RESPECT as HONORABLE and RESPECTABLE citizens. Once they lose these very important virtues, they consider themselves as failures and some go as far as killing themselves.

    “Hiya” on its positive merit is referred to as HONOR, once you lose it, almost impossible to get it back.

    And with your comments above it is obvious you don’t have one. And your quest with AP is to convert your fellow countrymen with your twisted logic that they should not have “hiya” and that all your efforts to show the world what is wrong with the Filipino People is perfectly alright.

    Think again. 

    • BongV says:

      How do you know I live in a junkyard, any proof of your claims? And no thanks for joining AP, I will never join the dark side.

      Lemme see – West Tower condo and the FPIC pipeline – is liveable or a high priced piece of real estate junk?

      were you critically thinking about this? or were you even thinking at all?
      how do you know that ildo and benigno are puttin junk? asking people to step up is junk? what a junkie .. HAHAHAH

    • BongV says:

      exposing people faults to make them change is bad?

      really?

      what do you want to do? not expose the faults?

      my my my.. are you an ostrich?

    • benign0 says:

      False analogy, dude. You are making a quaint appeal to emotion by trying to equate my regard for society to the way I regard my personal relationships with individual people in my life.

      First of all the behaviour of entire societies is in no way the same as that of an individual. And second, you do not know me and therefore have no idea how I treat the people I relate with on an individual basis. Tough luck, and keep on guessing.

      Hey wait, that’s two fallacies you have there – false analogy AND appeal to emotion.

      That’s a real talent for flawed thinking you got there, man. 😀

  24. simplesimon says:

    @ILDA

    By the way, I don’t claim to be an expert in English but just FYI

    Aide may refer to:A person who assists another; an assistant. In military contexts; an officer who acts as assistant to a more senior one; an aide-de-camp.Aide (deity), a purported Basque deity.
    For example, METRO AIDE, but in the case of FOREIGN AID there is no “E” at the end.

    CORRECT SPELLING:
    FOREIGN AID (also known as international aid, overseas aid, or foreign aid, especially in the United States) is a voluntary transfer of resources from one country to another, given at least partly with the objective of benefiting the recipient country

    My personal policy that my father taught me is PRAISE IN PUBLIC, REPRIMAND IN PRIVATE, sorry I could have corrected your English error here privately but I have no way of writing you in private but since you are an AP writer, and as Benigno pointed out you have no “hiya” naman anyway unlike us dumb Filipinos so you don’t mind me correcting your perfect English from time to time.

    Like I said I am not perfect I have typos all the time when I try to type too fast without checking but I am sure in your case that wasn’t a typo right?

    But in no way I am saying I’m smarter than you…
    Ta-ta!

    • ilda says:

      @dr jekyll and mr hyde (aka simplesimon)

      I can see that you have switched back to your troll mode. It was too hard for you to pretend being nice, I’m sure.

      Thank you for showing us all here how shallow you are. Of all the things that I stated, you chose to concentrate on a minor detail even if you get the point anyway. It shows your inability to rise above the situation you have cornered yourself into and refusal to accept that you have no valid argument whatsoever. You just simply don’t want to stop being silly.

      I have had many people correct my typos before but none as rude as you, thank you very much.

  25. Marv IN says:

    Hi simplesimon, I’m not an AP member and actually I’ve just recently discovered the site but I think you are misinterpreting the value of journalism.

    I can’t speak for others but I agree with you that as a “personal” policy Praise in Public, Reprimand in Private is a very good policy but I hope you also understand what journalism is supposed to be truly about.

    It’s about promoting transparency and awareness in citizens. Now whether the owners of a site is completely informed or unbiased or deserving of being called critical thinkers…that’s a separate argument.

    This is why although I agree with Ilda that your analogy is flawed (she uses the word ‘wrong’ but I hope this doesn’t get misinterpreted as putting words in people’s mouths but I just prefer using flawed), I don’t agree with her reasoning on why your analogy is wrong.

    My own reason for stating that it’s flawed is due to the way the discussion has morphed. Kung talagang valid ang analogy mo dapat ng sinundan ito ng mga opponents mo it leads to understanding and not silliness based around who lives in a junkyard or whatever else. It’s a perfect evidence of a flawed premise kung lalong lumalabo lang habang hinuhukay yung usapan.

    Note that this is just my personal viewpoint. I’m only bringing this up dahil I think at this point mahirap tumalon sa usapan na ito. Kailangan talaga bumalik sa umpisang comment mo.

    Tungkol sa umpisang analogy mo, kaya flawed siya because of the difference between personal vs. public issue. Ang problem kasi sa analogy mo ehh…marami eh…pero example:

    Physical problem ang basura. Ang in-example mo rin sa unit ay composed of ilan ilang tao lang. That’s why hindi pa ito public issue.

    It’s like kung tatlo lang kayo nagtalo sa restaurant, gulo ninyo iyon.

    Pero kung yung issue ay apektado sa lahat ng mga kumakain…say… puro daga pa la sa loob ng kusina nung restaurant…that’s public kasi lahat na tayo pwedeng maapektuhan niyan from yung plano pang pumasok to yung mga dating kumakain na.

    That is where the first question is answered. Right siya kasi baka nga halimbawa akala ng turista ok sa Pinas tapos na-hostage sila. Freedom of the press na ikanga.

    “2.Their original motive was clear, they wanted to clean their units, but they took out all of their junk outside of their units and in doing so affected everyone else, so what can we do?”

    Sa second question mo…ang problema parang mali yung grammar.

    Unless I’m misunderstanding AP, hindi dapat “but” ang isinulat mo bago sa took out all their junk.

    I think dapat ganito yung isinulat mo:

    “Their original motive was clear, they wanted to clean their units, “and their chosen way of doing this is through” taking out all of their junk outside of their units and in doing so affecting everyone else.”

    Medyo magulo pa rin but I hope medyo may naklaro rin. What can we do is not the job of any written site unless you created a site/article specifically for that.

    Ang task lang talaga ng isang site ay isulat ang gusto nilang isulat sa pananaw nila. Gayundin sa pag-highlight ng basura.

    Para mas simple imagine if it wasn’t AP but say BBC or any other neutral “international” news site. Tapos they specifically created a site to alert people of all the bad things that’s happening in the Philippines and then imagine na may mga nakakabasa at nakaka-alam nito.

    Is that too much freedom of speech? No, it’s actually the opposite.

    Sobrang kulang ng freedom of speech na nagkaroon ng niche ng mga taong gustong makarining ng mga pananaw na isang tipong Anti-Pinoy kaya nagkaroon ng audience ang AP.

    If totoong sobra ang freedom of speech, hindi magkakaroon ng audience ang AP dahil kung anumang sinabi ng AP, halos alam na ng lahat ng tao kaya hindi na interesado ang mga nagbabasa nito. Para bang sa dyaryo, kung pare pareho ang mga balita dala ng freedom of speech at freedom of the press, walang audience ang bagong dyaryo o site dahil walang impormasyon ito na ihinahatid na hindi rin hinahatid ng mga sikat na dyaryo o site. (Medyo iba sa TV kasi schedule iyan pero masyado ng lumalayo sa original analogy mo.)

    Tungkol sa hiya, no offense to both sides but I don’t think it’s productive to the AP vision or your own mission of working together towards a better future for the Philippines. Also I would like to apologize if this comment comes off as preachy. It’s very hard kasi to be in the middle of two opposing sides and telling them, I disagree with both of you and this is my reason why.

    • Jay says:

      It’s about promoting transparency and awareness in citizens. Now whether the owners of a site is completely informed or unbiased or deserving of being called critical thinkers…that’s a separate argument.

      Much better than the people they are calling out, and at least those who try offer counter-arguments but base it nothing more than conversation enders or basis made of fluff. Thing is to promote transparency and awareness, you have to meet the issues head on with facts in your hand and present them. AP has at least done that. Sure they have some issues where its more warm than hot, mostly based on speculation and older theories, but for the most part the way they go through their issues are well thought out. Sadly it doesn’t necessarily create a debate, which needs two parties of opposing thoughts.

      Tungkol sa umpisang analogy mo, kaya flawed siya because of the difference between personal vs. public issue.

      First off his analogies don’t correlate to the central point AT ALL. That is what analogies are suppose to do which is take otherwise a long connection, truncate it so even if it creates the obvious connection, it is still subtle enough to build on the associating points. So the burden goes to the person trying to create the analogies to support their arguments. Anyone smart knows that if they can’t do it, they give up on trying to make that connection and do something else using literary devices like similes or vivid descriptions.

      Para mas simple imagine if it wasn’t AP but say BBC or any other neutral “international” news site. Tapos they specifically created a site to alert people of all the bad things that’s happening in the Philippines and then imagine na may mga nakakabasa at nakaka-alam nito.

      I believe this goes back to ChinoF’s article about pinoys being pleasantry addicts. They take much more easily to good news, regardless of its context. We have too many avenues in media that deal with the pleasantry portion and subjective content rather than being completely objective. AP is being clearly objective, though at times the presentation of their information does come off rather harsh, certainly to those too insensitive the real point. To make a analogy of this, Those who see the forest for the trees. They end up over analyzing (like a cosmo rag) the other details that make up the strong and simple central theme and message. Thus drag on unneeded points to try look like they have an argument. I mean I’m all up for a 3rd party that just focuses on objectivity without giving any form of slant, but I like AP because it cuts to the point more than anything.

      Also I would like to apologize if this comment comes off as preachy. It’s very hard kasi to be in the middle of two opposing sides and telling them, I disagree with both of you and this is my reason why.

      Its a hell lot easier if you can easily communicate your message without beating around the bush. Work on that.

      • Marv IN says:

        “Its a hell lot easier if you can easily communicate your message without beating around the bush. Work on that.”

        Could you point out where I beated around the bush?

  26. Simplesimon says:

    @Benigno
    See? I don’t know you and you don’t know me in fact you DON’T have a clue who these Filipinos you are attacking so why be condescending? Sino ngayon ang makitid ang utak and flawed?

    @Ilda

    I have met some rude Pinoys but not as rude as these vomit-inducing articles here on AP.

    See ang sakit ng binabato ano? So ayaw mo palang mapa”hiya” in public sa mali mong English eh why do you expect magbago ang Pinoy kung ikaw mismo di mo matanggap ang kamalian mo!!!

    Sino mas rude sa atin ha? Yung pag correct ko sa yo sa English mo or your condescending, degrading, insulting, articles against Filipinos?

    Bakit niyo pinapainom sa amin ang gamot na ayaw niyo inumin?

    • benign0 says:

      Me? Condescending? Cite examples where I come across as “condescending”, plez. 😀

    • ilda says:

      @simpleton

      I don’t recall saying “ayaw kong mapahiya.”  But you now admit that your main intention here is pahiyain lang kami. You wrote a lot of nasty but false things about us but you are the one who somehow end up being offended and not us.  You should check your ego.

      So far, you have not been able to come up with anything valid to refute our claims, unfortunately. You just keep attacking the messenger. 

      I fail to see in any of my articles where I was “condescending, degrading, insulting.”  I still have it on record that you really liked my article. Here’s a reminder of what you said:

      I must say one of the better written articles here on AP…

      and this:

      First of all; the best part of your article was — The Republic of Korea: A story with a happy ending ok na ok yun wa ako masabi — those 20- or so paragraphs were awesome we should really learn from the Koreans, I totally agree.

      😆 😆 😆

    • ChinoF says:

      If you can’t take bitter medicine, then you must really like being sick. 😛 

  27. Simplesimon says:

    Thanks MarvIN I see your point. At least you explained yourself well without insulting anyone.

    I only have a tirador against automatic rifles that these people have here on AP

    They will always have the last say of course.

    It’s futile.

    • mario taporco says:

      @ Simplesimon,

      Don’t get too hung up, with benign0 and ilda. These two individuals I like, but I do not necessarily agree with their opinions, sometimes. With benign0, he tends to enlighten me with circumlocution. With ilda, she does open your minds and gets straight to the point.

      Both have good insightful commentaries. 

      If you think these two are condescending, and they are not. You should try hacking it with Ulong Pare.

      In second thought, you should abstain or be prepared for some major “Central Scrutinizer” That’s if you’re able to decipher what his[ulong pare] trying to tell you.

    • Maki_Alam says:

      Please don’t take this the wrong way, simplesimon. I’m not trying to be a smartass or anything. I’m just really curious. If you hate AP so much, why are you still here?

      • simplesimon says:

        @Maki_Alam

        No offense taken 🙂 after my last comment I was about to leave and just mind my own business

        But quite ironic isn’t it? Actually, I stumbled on this website looking for business opportunities in the Philippines after being abroad for a long time I wanted to go home for good just waiting for the right timing now…that’s why I am quite frustrated with all these negative things I read…having second thoughts now really…

        Which brings to mind a similar question—

        This may not be a question to you but mainly to the AP writers/members and to those who complain daily about Da Pinas and Da Pinoys condition which according to you is getting worse and worse, if you hate your country’s current leader, the Penafloridases, the Pempengcos, the Pacquiaos and the Arnel Pinedas, and mainly your lazy, stupid, moronic, fellow Pinoys so much

        —-why are you still living there??????

        And why do you even call yourselves Filipinos?

      • Maki_Alam says:

        I’ll answer your question anyway. I can’t speak for the AP writers/members; this is just my own take on things. Though they’ll probably tell you the same thing.

        Why am I still living here? Because I love my country, and it breaks my heart to see how most fellow Pinoys have been treating her.

        Let’s not even talk about PNoy and PacMan and Charice and Arnel for now. Are you familiar with the show ‘Taboo’ on the National Geographic channel? Well, we were featured in one episode. It was about the illegal organ trade, Pinoys selling their kidneys to foreigners just to make ends meet. Funnily enough, that’s not even the part that stood out to me. It was the background that was caught on camera. Abject poverty and garbage as far as the eye can see. It was hideous. And here it was being broadcast on an international channel for all the world to see. I think that show paints a far more dismal picture of the Philippines than this website ever could. It has an even bigger audience, too. If I were a foreigner watching that show, I’d be horrified and would never dream of setting foot on Philippine soil (unless I’m desperate for a kidney).

        It’s kind of hard to be proud of your house when the roof is leaking, the toilets are clogged and the garbage is all over the place. And it’s especially frustrating when your housemates refuse to help you clean up. If they truly love the house as much as they claim, they certainly have a very strange way of showing it. Is it really that hard to throw your own waste in the proper trash can? Trust me, the neighbors will know about your living conditions soon enough, even without the aid of a website pointing it out.

        Anyway, I just can’t help but be upset when I compare what I see here to orderly places like Singapore–a relatively new city-state over which we had a pretty good headstart. And I’d like to pose a question of my own, from one patriot to another: Why have we Pinoys allowed this to happen to our own Motherland?

      • ilda says:

        @simplesimon

        You are imagining things. We never said we hate the “the Penafloridases, the Pempengcos, the Pacquiaos and the Arnel Pinedas.”

        Check out the title of rafterman’s blog:

        Those Who Keep Saying “I am Proud to be a Filipino” When Manny Pacquiao Wins are Morons”

        And check out what I said here in my latest blog:

        It’s not that there is anything wrong with being happy for someone who achieves international recognition, it’s just that Filipinos tend to take it to the extreme and only idolize those who appear on TV and films due to their fame rather than those who work hard to excel in science and technology – those who can actually help elevate the status of the nation.

        Our message here is crystal clear . I don’t understand why you keep missing the point, really.

        And the answer to your question: Nobody has the authority to ask us why we call ourselves Filipino.

        P.S

        As an investor, you should thank AP then for giving you a realistic picture of the environment you are going to experience once you invest in the Philippines. At least you will be prepared. Of course you should also do your own research and use your own critical analysis before you commit to anything lest you blame us for a missed opportunity.

        There really is money to be made in a country with a population of 90 million. After all, the population is big on consumerism and small on caring for the environment. You just have to learn to accept that red tape, bribery and mediocre performance are part of the package 🙂

      • simplesimon says:

        Good thing I’m not a big deal, but the Philippines just lost one small investor right here.
        Well good work guys, keep it up. There’s a lot more people to scare out there.

        Good luck!

      • ilda says:

        @simpleton

        Once again you fail to see the big picture. You really do live up to your name.

        If the Philippine government is discerning enough, they should see the loss as a signal to start the badly needed cultural and economic reforms to attract more foreign investors in.

        You fail to realize that the whole exercise is to put pressure on the government and the people to change so we can attract more investors with our genuine abilities. The problem with you is, you want to deceive the investors into investing in the country and then “surprise” them with all the mediocrity once they are here.

      • Jay says:

        And why do you even call yourselves Filipinos?

        So you are implying you start speaking out against Filipinos that makes you less of one? What an idiot! Then again, that statement is coming from a guy who believes you can be proud of your genetic accident to be born into an ethnic background, among false analogies and more belief in hearsay and opinions.

        And you wonder why you are claiming you are being insulted when clearly, AP is the mirror that is telling you straight up you don’ t know what you are talking about.

        Invest all you want but there is a reason why they go somewhere else instead. If you think that isn’t vital, then find those who squandered money away and packed up to go somewhere else.

      • simplesimon says:

        NO you’re the ones who don’t get it.

        I failed i failed i failed, I’m a stupid Filipino and you’re smart that’s all you ever say…

        But just because I don’t agree with you, IT DOESN’T MEAN YOU’RE RIGHT, get it??

        So just keep painting all those ugly pictures of your own country to “show your love” then let’s see if your country nor anyone for that matter, loves you back…

        ADIOS!

      • ilda says:

        @simpleton

        You fail again to convince anyone here why you think we are wrong.

        You have said nothing of substance up to the very end. Good luck with your life because it seems that you have a problem with reality.

        😆

      • Jay says:

        But just because I don’t agree with you, IT DOESN’T MEAN YOU’RE RIGHT, get it??

        Learn your facts and opinions. Just because you trust opinions doesn’t mean it disproves something that is FACTUAL. Stop being asspained and having a victim complex with your self-pity. Its rather annoying.

        No one is painting an ugly picture hombre. You just can’t see the rust bucket for what it is. Paint rust any color and it is still rust. If anything, you don’t love the country because you are fine for what it is, even if it gets poisoned from selfish ignoramuses like you.

        Stay classy.

  28. simplesimon says:

    @Benigno, not condescending huh? Your Pacquaio and PNoy icons are beyond annoying just citing a couple of examples. Are you making fun of these 2 people? They may not be perfect but they got to where they wanted to be, probably where you wanted to be too but FAILED!!!
    I have more respect for them than 100 of all of you here combined. Ikaw Benigno saan mo ba gusto makarating ha?

    @ALL

    You didn’t get the basura analogy? Fine

    You didn’t get the Ilda selling her house without a real estate agent analogy? Fine

    You didn’t get the Benigno’s dirty secrets out in public analogy? That’s fine with me.

    I have no idea what kind of jobs you have, but just in case you’re not selling fishball on the street and you worked/working in a corporate environment well let me ask you this—

    Have you ever heard of INTERNAL and EXTERNAL EMAIL? That’s self-explanatory, hey Jay ping me if you don’t understand, we have a seminar on that specifically for the mentally retarded.

    Now, have you ever heard of EXTRANET AND INTRANET? Of course you know what INTERNET is but how about Extra and Intra?

    If you are an ignoramus like mumbling Jay here who is probably picking on his big nostrils right now, let me explain. 

    An EXTRANET is a computer network that allows controlled access from the outside, for specific business or educational purposes. An extranet can be viewed as an extension of a company’s intranet that is extended to users outside the company, usually partners, vendors, and suppliers. It has also been described as a “state of mind” in which the Internet is perceived as a way to do business with a selected set of other companies (business-to-business, B2B), in isolation from all other Internet users. In contrast, business-to-consumer (B2C) models involve known servers of one or more companies, communicating with previously unknown consumer users. An intranet is like a DMZ in that it provides access to needed services for channel partners, without granting access to an organization’s entire network.

    An INTRANET is a private computer network that uses Internet Protocol technologies to securely share any part of an organization’s information or network operating system within that organization. The term is used in contrast to internet, a network between organizations, and instead refers to a network within an organization. Sometimes the term refers only to the organization’s internal website, but may be a more extensive part of the organization’s information technology infrastructure. It may host multiple private websites and constitute an important component and focal point of internal communication and collaboration.

    Will just give you some examples—

    Example 
    Apple’s CEO Steve Jobs will not post on their APPLE.COM website for all the world to see an internal email addressed only to his staff of programmers and hardware techies about a very serious technical problem within APPLE that should be solved WITHIN APPLE before they launch a new product say iPhone G4, or Macbook Air, once these problems or bugs aren’t fixed before launching the product and it gets leaked out on the WORLD WIDE WEB, that will be a failure on Apple’s part and will affect sales of their products or even worse affect the value of their stock and may cause it to plunge to the depths of the ocean and may sink their company.

    INTRANET is basically internet just for corporate information to be disseminated within the company such as internal hiring,  profits and losses, and all very confidential matters that only employees can access and within INTRANET, there are also extra information that only board members or stockholders can access. Now EXTRANET is for the company’s various suppliers who are granted access to information meant for those involved in the manufacturing of a certain product.

    That illustrates basically INTERNAL/EXTERNAL mail, INTRANET/EXTRANET in a nutshell.

    NOW AS FOR YOU ANTI-PINOY SUCCESSFUL WANNABES—-

    By broadcasting to the world all these “national issues” you raise to an “international audience” you guys are doing MORE DAMAGE than good.

    This is not responsible journalism, you are plainly encouraging sensationalism. Sa Abante na lang kayo magsulat puede pa!

    So go back to selling kamote-Q on your street corner if you don’t get it! 

    Jay tawag ka na ng nanay mo asan na daw yung pinabibili nyang suka!!

    • benign0 says:

      Tsk tsk. You make it sound like becoming a boxing champ or President of the Philippines are the only worthwhile aspirations. That’s just sad. To be fair to Pacquiao, you need a bit of brain and discipline to be a world-class boxer. Can’t say the same about being a Pinoy politician. That is why lots of actors want to get into politics. It’s the only profession that does not require any real qualifications. 😀

    • dumb-oh says:

      namersonal na. Wala na ‘to. anong gusto mo? Pagtakpan ang basura? Eh malalaman din ng ibang lahi yan pagpunta nila dito. Tapos ikukuwento nila. Malalalaman ng pinoy. Tapos persona non grata agad. Lol.

    • ilda says:

      @Complicatedsimon

      The only difference we have with the conventional activists who go on foot is that we don’t have to suffer the heat, humidity and pollution on the streets of Manila.

      However, what we have in common with the conventional activists is that we both have something to say and we want people to pay attention to what we are saying. So therefore, it does not make any sense for us to keep our views among ourselves. Comprende’?

      Sobrang ganda na ng sagot sayo ni Maki_Alam atsaka si Jay hinde pa ka din natauhan? Ano ba yan!

      • simplesimon says:

        Even if you rally out on the streets with a huge banner that says ANTI-PINOY
        Who will listen to you? Comprende?

      • ilda says:

        Ang dami na ngang nakikinig eh. Just check out how many times this article has been shared on FB and reTweeted. So far the only person who objected to it is simplesimon

        😆

      • simplesimon says:

        Dream on Ilda, Do you know how many members of FB? 500million plus, retweet man nila at i-post sa fb mas marami nag-oobject duon try it, go and take a look—you know why nag-iisa ako mag-object sa opinions niyo rito? They’re all afraid to get in here and comment kasi what’s the point, like helpless sheep, AP will pounce on them like hungry wolves before they can even say a word, and that’s what you guys are notorious for NAME-CALLING, you have the vilest mouths on the internet next to youtube commentators.

        In the meantime, heto stats ng AP:

        24 visitors online now20 guests, 2 bots, 2 membersMax visitors today: 33 at 02:43 am ESTThis month: 76 at 11-23-2010 07:21 am ESTThis year: 351 at 07-26-2010 07:02 am EDTAll time: 351 at 07-26-2010 07:02 am EDT
        351 visitors in a YEAR! Cool! 

        You’ll all be dead by the time you reach 90 million Filipinos to listen

        And even if Lady Gaga has 23 million fans, it doesn’t mean her music doesn’t suck! 

        But that’s a different topic….

      • ilda says:

        @simonsays

        Thanks for the laughs. I really appreciate it first thing in the morning.

        Thanks also for pasting info that’s readily accessible to everyone. I’m pretty sure you know that the stats fluctuate from time to time. I believe you are just trying to act all ignorant for your own convenience.

        Guess what? FB’s 500 million members are not all Filipino. Why would they bother to share our articles?!? And try and be more realistic because it’s too ridiculous of you to even think that all Filipino members of FB will become fans of AP. Gees!

        And the 90 million Filipinos you are talking about are not all old enough to walk or talk let alone log on to a computer.

        Here’s another thing you don’t realize: while we appreciate our loyal readers here, we do target the movers and shakers of our society – those who have access to media and lawmakers; in other words, those who can make a difference in reaching out to the masses. And I’m sorry to say that we are starting to get attention from them. In fact, Carmen Pedrosa who writes for Philstar wrote about AntiPinoy.com. Read it and weep:

        When it is right to be anti-Pinoy

      • Jay says:

        @simpletonsimon

        You didn’t get that you need to improve on your ability to make better analogies, which even a neutral poster Marv IN commented on? I’m surprised at your intelligence, since you are doing your best to continue maintaining it the way it is.

        BTW, I WAS picking my nose and nearly went up my nasal when I was forced to read a wall of text that you call an analogy. Ping you later? How about you never get to any career in teaching considering you are incapable of explaining basic I.T. concepts in one paragraph. Then you follow it up with a stinker of a line:

        By broadcasting to the world all these “national issues” you raise to an “international audience” you guys are doing MORE DAMAGE than good.

        As if the national audience has not caught on? See who the ignoramus is now. Yes, the guy who keeps blabbing away about how his points make more sense when it doesn’t even read the well developed articles in the site, some with points of views of events in the country from the international community! Should I throw a bone or deny you a hint? The Philippines aren’t too good in hiding their trash as the entire world can catch the rotten stench anyway..

        This is not responsible journalism
        Who says blogs, forums and such are deviations of official journalism? Is PDI, ABS-CBN responsible journalism? And on a lesser deviation GMA-7 and Philstar? Or even those wonderful editorial minds like De Quiros, or that fellow who broke out with an apologist sounding article regarding the events in aug 23 about pinoys being the first to be critical about themselves? Those are official Philippine journalist outlets but they are even worst than notorious biased journalist firms (which are biased to begin with at some point anyway) like Faux News Network.

        you are plainly encouraging sensationalism
        So says the guy who is SPREADING sensationalism but won’t admit the hearsay and opinions about a positive Philippines isn’t one, since they are pretty much embellishments of what want to believe.

        Even if you rally out on the streets with a huge banner that says ANTI-PINOY
        Who will listen to you? Comprende?

        Hence why the effort to help change the point of views. If you don’t want in, like I’ve said fine. You can wine and dine with the whiners with their cheese in pro-pinoy sites you seem to admire for their journalistic integrity. And hey, nobody listened and look what is in store for the next six years. Change doesn’t happen because we wait for it like you want to believe. There has to be initiative and not like the stupid save pasig river by running idiocy. Tu no comprendes porque tu no sabes nada, burro!

    • blueredicedtea says:

      @simplesimon

      “By broadcasting to the world all these “national issues” you raise to an “international audience” you guys are doing MORE DAMAGE than good.”

      sounds like ap authors is using the force to destroy the philippines. HOLY S-HIT!
      anyways simon….bel..i mean simplesimon
      which is doing more harm to our country?
      the authors of this site?
      or the flips who will not say the truth about our sad state of our country?
      and you’re resorting to emotion leading to a senseless crusades such as this.

  29. Maki_Alam says:

    Well, I guess it’s pretty obvious neither side is going to budge. Why don’t we just agree to disagree and do what each believes is best for the good of the country? We have that in common, at least. A shared concern for the Philippines, that is. Bickering amongst ourselves certainly won’t solve anything.

    • Jay says:

      Actually, certain individuals need to change their form of discourse from bickering. Most of AP are willing to contribute, share ideas and such. Then again, the piece presented doesn’t really add much to the discussion to what is already established about the subject at hand.

      • ilda says:

        It is pretty obvious that simpleton here has scraped the bottom of his barrel since the 21st of Nov and is now just throwing mud around.

        He is all about the numbers. God knows that changing the mindset of Filipinos is a long-drawn-out-battle. We are not going to win it overnight but if I could change at least one person’s point of view every time I write an article, that is good enough for me.

      • simplesimon says:

        Do you know how I see you AP? And why I keep coming back here even though I should be enjoying my weekend right now and it’s a pretty nice sunny autumn Saturday out there. Just getting ready now to see friends will enjoy conversations and some snacks in the park.

        Ok back to the answer to my question

        This is how I see you, I see you as PESTS. And I see myself as some sort of a PEST EXTERMINATOR. Although it may seem I’m alone, but actually whoever disagrees with AP are automatically yanked out of the site for BAD BEHAVIOR.

        This is how it is, believe it or not—

        We, millions of Filipinos, work our collective asses off abroad to send much needed hard currency Dollar, Yen, Euro what have you, to send to the Philippines for our future homes and livelihood with our families, children and future grandchildren. We don’t live luxuriously abroad  because we can’t afford it and because we would rather enjoy our lives later when we get back home ONE DAY.

        At the same time, there are millions of other HARD-WORKING Filipinos in the Philippines as well, so we are all helping build the Philippines and make it a better country and a better place to live in.

        There are a gazillions of problems yes, and we all know that. Pinoys know that, Foreigners all know that. But we can try coming up with solutions and not ADD MORE PROBLEMS which obviously are all over your front page, not very encouraging putting the Philippines in a very bad light.

        So while we are all working, you AP are like TERMITES, with all your bad mouthing your fellow Pinoys, you are eating away at the very foundation of the house we are trying to BUILD. 

        By the time we get home, the house we are trying to build will have collapsed thanks to you all.

        I myself in my own little way is actively trying to encourage my foreign co-workers and superiors to invest into setting up small franchisable stores at SM because foreign currency is at an ALL-TIME HIGH right now and anything we can pump into the economy will surely help.

        So just like what MAKI_ALAM said, why can’t we just get along and WORK TOGETHER and stop all these promotion of NEGATIVITY? For starters, the name ANTI-PINOY will never catch on, it’s oh-so-negative from the git-go. You sound and write your articles here like Nazis trying to exterminate the Jews.

        And I believe you people here are some of the smartest Pinoys I’ve seen online and I am totally with you in trying to solve the Philippines’ problems but I don’t think this BLACK PROPAGANDA is gonna work.
         
        You keep saying my analogies are flawed, but I think your whole AP concept is terribly FLAWED.

      • benign0 says:

        Good luck exterminating us “pests”. You either deal with our existence or continue going around stomping your feet the way you are doing right now. See if you will get any results that way. 😀

      • ilda says:

        simonsays

        I myself in my own little way is actively trying to encourage my foreign co-workers and superiors to invest into setting up small franchisable stores at SM because foreign currency is at an ALL-TIME HIGH right now and anything we can pump into the economy will surely help.”

        Ilda says

        We’re not stopping you from doing what you want to do. In fact, I don’t understand why you would not proceed with your plans considering you don’t believe us anyway.

        simonsays

        So while we are all working, you AP are like TERMITES, with all your bad mouthing your fellow Pinoys, you are eating away at the very foundation of the house we are trying to BUILD.

        Ilda says

        This has been addressed so many times. We are not badmouthing the country. We are just stating the problem and our opinion on how to solve it . Even if we don’t highlight the problem, bad news will still reach the international media when another crisis happens or as Maki_Alam said, when another documentary about the Philippines is made and shown to another country. Kindly read the above comments relating to this again because I’m starting to sound like a broken record.

        simonsays

        So just like what MAKI_ALAM said, why can’t we just get along and WORK TOGETHER and stop all these promotion of NEGATIVITY?

        Ilda says

        Why don’t you follow the advice and stop badmouthing AP? You are the one who is on our turf. You are just a guest here so behave like a gracious guest. I tried in vain to talk some sense into you in the beginning but it’s clear that I just wasted my time because you’ve already confirmed that your primary purpose is just to wreak havoc in this site.

        simonsays

        And I believe you people here are some of the smartest Pinoys I’ve seen online and I am totally with you in trying to solve the Philippines’ problems but I don’t think this BLACK PROPAGANDA is gonna work.

        Ilda says

        Where is the black propaganda you are talking about? You could not even refute anything about the article. Face it man. When your arguments are weak, it only means it’s time to let go of your misconceptions about what we do. Alam mo pa lang palpak ang Pilipinas why aren’t you even interested in finding out the reason why it is so? AP is just troubleshooting. Here is the meaning of the word troubleshooting for you from the Net:

        In general, troubleshooting is the identification of, or diagnosis of “trouble” in the management flow of a corporation or a system caused by a failure of some kind. The problem is initially described as symptoms of malfunction, and troubleshooting is the process of determining and remedying to the causes of these symptoms.

        Troubleshooting is a form of problem solving, often applied to repair failed products or processes. It is a logical, systematic search for the source of a problem so that it can be solved, and so the product or process can be made operational again. Troubleshooting is needed to develop and maintain complex systems where the symptoms of a problem can have many possible causes.

        Troubleshooting requires identification of the malfunction(s) or symptoms within a system. Then, experience is commonly used to generate possible causes of the symptoms. Determining which cause is most likely is often a process of elimination – eliminating potential causes of a problem. Finally, troubleshooting requires confirmation that the solution restores the product or process to its working state.

        There is only one reason why there are only a few people who dare contradict AP: It’s really hard to find valid arguments against the truth.

      • ilda says:

        @simonsimple

        Here’s an article for you from the mainstream media:

        Asian rights group calls PHL ‘broken and lawless nation’

        http://ph.news.yahoo.com/gma/20101127/tph-asian-rights-group-calls-phl-broken-d6cd5cf.html

        Enjoy reading the bad news. At least it’s not from AP. 😆

  30. simplesimon says:

    @Benigno 
    So you do admit you’re nothing but a termite, a pest…not here to build but to destroy, finally there goes the truth ladies and gentlemen…

    @Ilda
    Queen of denials, pang showbiz ka talaga, bumalik ka na lang kaya sa dati mong trabaho sa YES! magazine—-

    I don’t know what dictionary you use but here are some of “you’re not bad-mouthing” articles here on AP, if that’s not what you call bad-mouthing I don’t know what it is

    Andal Ampatuan Jr: No different from the average Filipino schmoe

    It is hard to change our view that the Filipino is a stupid creature. Like the driver in the taxi, Filipinos just keep on doing the stupidest things without….

    Wow Kulelat Philippines and the Uncertainty Principle

    “Beautiful Philippines”: a case of false advertising

    What kills a skunk is the publicity it gives itself. ———-Abraham Lincoln———– 

    • benign0 says:

      Guess again, dude. More like me proving that you’d lap up any scraps thrown at you and latch on to these as some kind of “truth” to which you then make yourself beholden to. 😀

      By the way, here is a graphic that I used on my site back in the old days. I just thought I’d share it with you and see if you might take a fancy to it.

    • ilda says:

      @simplengayawmagpatalongsimon

      So? What’s your problem with the titles? 😉

      They are all based on what is happening in the country and the perception created by the Phil media.

      Why did you ignore that article I provided for you? It’s the same thing and it’s from the mainstream media. It’s online too, which means everyone can read it including the people overseas. Check it out again:

      Asian rights group calls PHL ‘broken and lawless nation’

      http://ph.news.yahoo.com/gma/20101127/tph-asian-rights-group-calls-phl-broken-d6cd5cf.html

      And here is another article from Philstar with a bitter title:

      Pilipinas, kay pangit!

      http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=633825&publicationSubCategoryId=64

      Wag ka na magtampo. There is no denying that the Phils is becoming the wild, wild west. The problem will just get worse if you continue to pretend there is nothing wrong.

      • Aegis-Judex says:

        Well, to be fair to the Wild West, there was less crime in those times primarily because practically everyone packed heat. God help you if you were a miscreant during that era, because if the cops do not give you your just penalty (it might not be worth the paperwork to the average policeman), an ordinary citizen would most likely do it him/herself (no bureaucratic hurdles to clear–just shoot).

      • ilda says:

        no bureaucratic hurdles to clear–just shoot

        That’s what’s happening now in Mindanao with some members of the PNP being hired as goons.

      • Aegis-Judex says:

        But if one could replicate that sort of scenario, perhaps even the goons would think twice…

  31. blueredicedtea says:

    “Why don’t you follow the advice and stop badmouthing AP? You are the one who is on our turf. You are just a guest here so behave like a gracious guest. I tried in vain to talk some sense into you in the beginning but it’s clear that I just wasted my time because you’ve already confirmed that your primary purpose is just to wreak havoc in this site.”

    @ilda my lady,(or is it lord? lolz 😀 im just kidding there) jay and others

    ignore that troll
    he/she thinks that raising awareness of the problems in our country is a senseless crusade

    final post to this troll
    @simplesimon

    “This is how I see you, I see you as PESTS. And I see myself as some sort of a PEST EXTERMINATOR. Although it may seem I’m alone, but actually whoever disagrees with AP are automatically yanked out of the site for BAD BEHAVIOR.”

    last time i checked bongV hadn’t banned anybody………not even moderated your posts.

    “And I believe you people here are some of the smartest Pinoys I’ve seen online and I am totally with you in trying to solve the Philippines’ problems but I don’t think this (BLACK PROPAGANDA) is gonna work.”

    You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. –Inigo Montoya

    granted, they already have the facts there posted. you just have to lurk moar of this site.
    and besides suppressing the truth about our sorry state is just plain unpatriotic.

    “So just like what MAKI_ALAM said, why can’t we just get along and WORK TOGETHER and stop all these promotion of NEGATIVITY? For starters, the name ANTI-PINOY will never catch on, it’s oh-so-negative from the git-go. You sound and write your articles here like Nazis trying to exterminate the Jews.”

    uhh…..ap had a lot of articles about the problems and possible solutions in our country. is it promotion of negativity to you? learn2readandunderstandmoar
    and who is really the antipinoy? the authors of this site who raises awareness of our problems in our country?  or the flips who still upholding their s-hitty culture?
    and the nazi analogy?……..you sound like godwin. LOL

     

    • simplesimon says:

      Oooops I believe I took a wrong turn on the information highway and ended up here in the AP ghetto, excuse me while i make a U-Turn and get back to my normal life…

      In the meantime, while you’re loathing in self-pity on your “pathetic lives” as so-called Pinoys or Anti-Pinoys or whatever you wanna call yourselves asking for help and charity from the world so you can afford your Korean neighbors’ Hyundai, Japanese neighbors’ PS3, German neighbors’ Benz and your American neighbors Apple TV…perhaps you will start counting your blessings and be glad you even have a roof over your head, food on your table or even a country who lets you live in its’ land while you’re daily spitting at its face…

      Maybe you should start looking at the glass half full instead of half-empty…watch these films and if you don’t start feeling good about yourself it’s time to see a psychiatrist 🙂

      The Counterfeiters
      Dark Blue World
      Schindler’s List
      The Pianist
      Hotel Rwanda
      Letters from Iwo Jima
      Platoon
      Apocalypse Now
      City of God
      Fahrenheit 9/11

      • Maki_Alam says:

        No doctor in his right mind would look at an injured person and say, “Oh, let’s just cover you up and hope nobody notices, and take these painkillers in the meantime. You won’t get well, but they’ll make you feel good.” A competent doctor will probe and inspect every wound, ask questions and decide how best to treat the patient. That’s what we’re doing here, and it’s the farthest thing from self-pity and spitting in the patient’s face. I know you don’t believe it, simplesimon, but despite what you may think, we do love our country and we will keep on probing and inspecting every wound, no matter how much it hurts. The road to recovery is long and painful, but the first step toward that is always an accurate diagnosis.

        I understand where you’re coming from. Really, I do. And I respect your point of view. Going back to the medical analogy, you don’t want to hear the worst that the doctor has to say regarding your loved one’s condition. That’s completely understandable. But please bear in mind that we do this not because we get some kind of sick pleasure out of telling people what they don’t want to hear. We do this because we are genuinely concerned, and it is in the patient’s best interest to identify and deal with the problem. Because if we don’t talk about the problem, we’ll never find a cure.

        I hope this helps you understand where we are coming from as well. I’m not going to argue. Say what you will about us, but please do not doubt for one second that we love our country and would want nothing more than to see her well again.

      • simplesimon says:

        Of all the people in here, Maki_Alam I totally respect you.

        God bless.

      • ilda says:

        @Mr paulit-ulit simon

        As I said in my latest blog, which is dedicated to you, the more applicable proverbial expression for Filipinos is :

        “The glass is not half-full if it isn’t half-empty.” We can’t always pretend not to see the dark side of any given situation. Having an incompetent leader like President Noynoy Aquino for example, is a situation that has more dark side than bright side. If Filipinos continue to refuse to prepare for the worst case scenario, they might just get a rude shock one day upon realizing that they are already stuck between a rock and a hard place. Not that we are not yet stuck in a difficult situation; we already are, except some of us just don’t realize it yet or refuse to accept it and, worse, are not prepared for it.

        The films you saw were supposed to help you be more sympathetic to the cause of the oppressed not be apathetic. It seems that you have missed the point even after watching them.

        Here’s a better suggestion: read more books. It will give you insight and will help open your mind a little bit. You can start with this book:

        A little History of The World by E.H. Gombrich

      • Jay says:

        Oh Simpleton wants the last word. Allow me to fully deny it and boy I’ve been saving it up.

        Whose wallowing in self pity? The guy looking at the Philippines with every little bit of embellished detail of what is good of the country or the people who know it can be even better but happen to exercise common sense that is dialed to the tune of REALITY CHECK? Unless people start thinking of real progress and ways to get to it, there won’t be REAL PROGRESS. You want me to dish out something positive that you couldn’t even asspull?

        RESOURCES! The Philippines have abundant resources that are untapped, unwarranted and unavailable for its proper utilization due to government red tape, useless laws and such other things. You keep dreaming about OFW’s working hard to send their hard earned money back home for a more comfortable life. Korea has LONG BEEN PAST THAT! That is the reason why they can afford Japanese PS3, German engineered automobiles and American inspired tech that was mostly manufactured in China! Without foresight and involvement on a real national level in issues that really matter, all there is are individual things one can count on like a pension or social security.

        Oh and the things you take for granted, could technically be covered for most Pinoy if it weren’t for idiots like you who think its hard to come by due to the system. NOT EVEN THE FARMERS OWN THEIR LANDS! Maybe you should look at the rice you eat next time and see the long trip it made, either from the fields of breadbasket of the country or even better, from an even farther breadbasket originating in Vietnam or China. Or that head of cabbage you bought for 100 pesos, which has long been robbed its value due to the crappy logistic system of the food transportation and storage. The simple things that factor in to why food is so expensive yet Pinoys load up on the white rice.

        Save your films for those who jerk tears for sympathy or intro to Psychology 101. Even Sicko was a much more satisfying watch from Moore.

    • ilda says:

      @blueredicedtea

      He doesn’t know the meaning of the expression “quit while you’re ahead” or even the saying “leave the party while you are still having fun.”

      Like a typical Pinoy, he does not have an exit strategy due to lack of foresight.

      • simplesimon says:

        Someday you will regret all this Ilda and the rest of you who take pleasure in attacking your own culture and lineage.
         
        You have no idea of the magnitude of damage you are doing here. 

        Maki_Alam has suggested we all work together and I totally agree, he gave the finest analogy in his latest message and I totally agree. I respect him because he shows respect to the people he wants to serve and help.

        But you on the other hand, as long as you play your holier, smarter and better than thou attitude toward your fellow Pinoys, you will be nothing but a quack doctor who will keep guessing what medicine to give an ailing Filipino.

        You’re burning down your own house just to kill a rat.

        Such a pity.

      • ilda says:

        Ugh…please tell me exactly when I am going to regret this because I actually regret not writing all of this sooner.

        You might have missed the part where Maki_Alam said:

        But please bear in mind that we do this not because we get some kind of sick pleasure out of telling people what they don’t want to hear. We do this because we are genuinely concerned, and it is in the patient’s best interest to identify and deal with the problem. Because if we don’t talk about the problem, we’ll never find a cure.

        Try not to be a point misser again.

      • Jay says:

        You know, people rather misinterpret love when they do things out for concern. But it is better that way than to be ignorant and assume that love is always there for the best.

        you will be nothing but a quack doctor who will keep guessing what medicine to give an ailing Filipino.

        And the ailing Filipino will die due to stubbornness. End of story. Looks like the doctors DO KNOW what they are talking about but the patient, instead of following ways to become healthy follows the Pinoy way of death by taxes, pulutan, diabetes, second hand smoke, other genetic diseases that are never followed up to due to a strong, misplaced sense of pride and lack of acknowledgment for the facts.

        Besides, what got the Filipino ailing to begin with? They could have been healthy, if they had done what was needed to maintain great health then.

      • Jay says:


        You have no idea of the magnitude of damage you are doing here.

        Neither did Cory and her perversion of People Power as the greatest voice of democracy, Marcos and his overstepping boundaries to enforce his political will, Quezon for choosing to live in Hell governed by Pinoys that never changed their way of thinking, the Lopez’s and other Oligarchs for choosing to run the economy like a mule in favor of old laws and holding monopoly on vital industries, among other things that you feel was integral by the key political movers of the country.

        You think is all just some elaborate ruse? This was all set up then and NO ONE TALKED ABOUT IT, only to leave it as part of history to rinse and repeat itself due to nobody paying attention, especially the likes of YOU!

  32. An American says:

    “In other words, it took a while for them to shake off the idea of full submission to a single authority figure.” I think this is the fact that they were a Spanish colony for a while, whereas America declared independence early on. I don’t think this is Confucianism vs. Christianity, as Christianity believes in equality. You only have authority because God gave it to you, not because you are superior or anything.
    “This might explain why Filipinos still think that their duty as a citizen ends after voting during the election.”
    Here in America, many Americans don’t vote at all.
    “I don’t recall Kazakhstan asking for an apology from Sacha Baron Cohen (Borat) when he dedicated an entire film to depicting a caricature of its people. Suffice to say Cohen’s depiction of Kazakhstan’s citizens wasn’t very flattering.”
    Actually, Kazakhstan did whine about it.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borat#Criticism_by_Kazakhstan
    Iran complained about the 300. The Philippines is not the only country that complained about such portrayals. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/300_%28film%29#Depictions_of_Persians_and_Iran.27s_reaction
    In America, people sue about practically anything.
    “The hardworking mentality is obviously another legacy of being ruled under an iron fist for several decades. Second to being hardworking, after decades of fearing their neighbor, Koreans worked on their national psyche and embraced globalization. They recognized that they needed to adjust their attitude towards race, the concept of citizenship based on blood, the underlying fear and intolerance of outsiders because ‘it was the greatest single weakness in their culture’ according to Greg Sheridan.”
    I think Philippines has a colonial mentality instead. Anyway, I think a lot of Filipinos are hardworking, at least the ones that make it here to America. But I do think the blame game is a problem in the Philippines, as it is in America.

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